U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-31-2015, 07:11 PM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505

Advertisements

You may find this article to be interesting: States With No Income Tax: Better Or Worse To Live There? | Bankrate.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-31-2015, 08:31 PM
 
892 posts, read 1,094,701 times
Reputation: 738
I am white, but have lived around Asians enough of my life that they often appoint me to being the "diversity officer" for various Asian-American organizations. I just wanted to point out that most Midwestern states have significantly more recent immigrants from Asian countries than they do from Latin American countries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2015, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
5,662 posts, read 3,645,631 times
Reputation: 16603
If you're not interested in the suburbs, or extra-large cities, you'll pretty much have to knock the East Coast off your list. New York City (especially Queens) has a large Asian population, but the rest of the Asians in this part of the country tend to cluster in the suburbs. My own area (a suburb of Baltimore, and not far from Washington, DC) has a high concentration of Asians, primarily of Korean heritage but also a not-small contingent of Chinese-heritage folks.

BTW, I'm white. FWIW, a fair number of my friends are Asian. As far as I can tell, they are as well integrated into the community as anyone else.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2015, 08:52 PM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
If you're not interested in the suburbs, or extra-large cities, you'll pretty much have to knock the East Coast off your list. New York City (especially Queens) has a large Asian population, but the rest of the Asians in this part of the country tend to cluster in the suburbs. My own area (a suburb of Baltimore, and not far from Washington, DC) has a high concentration of Asians, primarily of Korean heritage but also a not-small contingent of Chinese-heritage folks.

BTW, I'm white. FWIW, a fair number of my friends are Asian. As far as I can tell, they are as well integrated into the community as anyone else.
You actually can find Asian communities in cities in the Interior Northeast. Neighborhoods near a major university tend to have good sized Asian populations, as do college towns. You may also have neighborhoods with a growing Asian immigrant/refugee population as well.

I also thought about a city like Ann Arbor MI, which has some urban amenities and is close enough to the Detroit metro.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2015, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10 posts, read 20,004 times
Reputation: 22
I appreciate everyone sharing their thoughts. I just wanted to make a clarification. I am not an immigrant but was born in the US and have lived here my whole life. I don't have any problem with immigrants and don't think that I am "better" than them, however, I am wary of injecting myself into an area whose Asian population is primarily new immigrants. I have done this before and when I am in such a place, I sense much more anxiety in others when I "walk into the room". I think it is because people have assumed that I am an immigrant and therefore there will be language/cultural communication issues. This anxiety doesn't go away when I start talking. For this reason, I think it is not a good idea to simply look at demographic stats and judge based on % of population Asian.

ckh, I hear you about university towns. You are basically describing Austin/UT although perhaps it may be worth my thinking about whether the change in Austin's character this century means that Austin is no longer a college town and another college town would be worth trying.

Last edited by TXDreamer; 06-01-2015 at 07:40 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2015, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
5,662 posts, read 3,645,631 times
Reputation: 16603
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXDreamer View Post
It's not necessarily that I need to have Asian friends, it's more that I want to be around people who are comfortable being around me and don't view me as "different".
I would have to assume that you would be most comfortable in an area that has a substantial population of Americans who happen to be Asian, not only because of the presence of the Asians themselves, but also because the non-Asians in the area would be used to being around Asians and (presumably) comfortable with them. Thus, I do think it makes sense to consider the Asian share of the population for whatever area you would want to consider, even if you don't want to limit yourself to only having Asian friends.

I know that in my area, we have Asians who are indistinguishable from any other Americans (aside from their physical appearance) as well as Asians who can barely string two English words together. It's normal around here to see Korean-language signage on store fronts, but its also normal to be friends with fellow Americans with names like "Steve Kim" and "Jane Choi" If you were to live in my area, you would probably not have much in common with the "Fresh off the Boat" Asians here. But you would find plenty of fellow Americans who match your general appearance, and plenty of other people for whom the sight of an Asian person is an everyday occurrence, and who would not regard you as some freak of nature because of your skin color or the shape of your eyes.

I would not automatically discount looking at college towns; but remember that life in places like that tends to revolve around the college; and it sounds like you've grown beyond that stage of your life. And while only you can decide if you would be comfortable living in a suburb, your options will definitely expand if you're willing to consider it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2015, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,312 posts, read 6,969,122 times
Reputation: 3503
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXDreamer View Post
Thanks everyone for your answers.

projectmaximus, there is really no specific cutoff point as far as population size. I have just found that larger cities tend to be a lot less friendly and safe. I also don't like crowded places, just my preference. Austin is not a bad place by any means. But either it has changed a lot, and/or my situation has changed based on my age / life situation. Most of my Asian friends from college left for bigger cities, where career opportunities are better. I have been fortunate to be able to remain here while the getting was good.

skid, while you are correct, I am not ready for suburban life yet. And as a single person I probably wouldn't fit in that well either.

LEC, California definitely seems very friendly to Asians, at least LA/OC. That was my plan but I am trying to find something in another state to avoid the CA personal income tax. You mentioned that you lived in Washington state -- can you comment on Vancouver, WA? I considered living there to avoid state income tax while being a short drive from Portland.
Hmm, if you're not interested in suburbs but don't want dense crowded areas, you've got limited options to work with. I understand there's an in between, but it's still hard to gauge what is too big for you. Why not one of the outer boroughs of New York City? Or a walkable suburb of DC? Would those work except for cost? There are quasi-urban, city-living areas in the places I mentioned before, which are all business-friendly climates (the Florida cities especially).

I'm curious about Vancouver, WA as well. Never made it up there when I was in Portland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2015, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Stapleton (Denver)
52 posts, read 60,936 times
Reputation: 68
Seattle? I'm half-Japanese and always felt very at home there: Uwajimaya, Japan town, etc.

I like my current city of Denver but there's hardly any Asian presence, just a few overpriced groceries downtown and the usual Ranch 99 type Chinese/Korean stores further in the periphery. I hardly ever see an Asian face on the street, although there is a comparatively higher concentration in my neighborhood, Stapleton.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2015, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10 posts, read 20,004 times
Reputation: 22
bus man, I am not speculating, I am speaking from experience. I wouldn't consider it an improvement from my current situation to "not be considered a freak of nature". I already have that where I am.

projectmaximus, I would possibly consider a "walkable suburb". I personally did not like NY when I lived there (I was in Manhattan, though, not Flushing). I don't know much about DC Suburbs other than Northern VA which I thought was nice if a bit boring. Financially, my focus is more on income tax than on cost of living. Downtown Austin is already more expensive than most places in the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2015, 11:54 AM
 
56,595 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
What about cities like Manchester NH or Anchorage AK?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top