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Old 06-03-2015, 11:58 AM
 
Location: California → Tennessee → Ohio
1,400 posts, read 2,285,723 times
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Irvine, California

Irvine's Asian population booms, boosting the local real estate market | 89.3 KPCC
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Old 07-01-2015, 10:40 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,824 times
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My parents immigrated from Korea, I was born in Knoxville but grew up mostly in a (farther out, like 35 minute drive) suburb of Boston. I live in the Bay Area now, but spent time in the close-in suburbs of Boston (Somerville, Arlington, Cambridge...). Boston's a good college town, so when you're around those areas people don't pull the corners of their eyes up or down when they see you, but you can get a muttered "damn *****" if you bump into someone wrong in other more sketchy parts. It's also one of the smaller cities, is walkable, good public transportation, good nightlife (although waiting in lines for clubs in winter? Never got that).
Generally people will express interest in you (single you out) if they don't really know many Asian Americans, in a good way, but also remember it's Boston, so it will often have an edge to it. I like to think Boston is the more avuncular version of New York, where they'll rib you and give you a hard time, but in fun. By the time I left in 2006 I was definitely noticing more and more Asian faces on the streets of Boston proper, especially compared to 1996. And there are enclaves where some people barely speak English, vis a vis Chinatown, because they don't need to.
Major Asian markets are pretty well established by this point, but you may have to drive a bit to get to one. I've heard that Quincy is the new Chinatown. Didn't get the sense that the food thing was that important to you, though. Or church? A handful of majority 2nd generation Asian American (mixed ethnicities) churches in the area.
The suburb suburbs are definitely nothing like California, though. I was once asked when I was going to start dating the only other Korean American girl in my high school class. Compare that to my wife's experience growing up in the Bay Area where she had fewer white friends than Asian, and people knew the difference between Taiwanese and Chinese.
As for the other places I've lived, don't go to Buffalo (even if the college population drives up the Asian percentage) or Reno. They are not what you are looking for. I found this post because my wife and I would dream of moving somewhere less crowded but still has enough Asians that my daughter won't have to grow up with an experience similar to mine and we can still get fresh, relatively inexpensive Asian groceries. Unfortunately we also have other limitations such as my wife's (in)tolerance for certain climates as a California girl. Hawaii too expensive, don't want to go to Canada mostly because it's too cold, Seattle risky for similar reason.. East coast like Fairfax would be a major move, and not sure how much my wife would like to be surrounded by Koreans though (she's Taiwanese American). It's interesting looking at the census report on Asian American demographics in the U.S. because they track single vs mixed ethnicity percentages. A few places you wouldn't really expect like Utah, IIRC.
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Old 07-02-2015, 07:34 AM
 
56,618 posts, read 80,930,134 times
Reputation: 12508
Quote:
Originally Posted by yeabirfday View Post
My parents immigrated from Korea, I was born in Knoxville but grew up mostly in a (farther out, like 35 minute drive) suburb of Boston. I live in the Bay Area now, but spent time in the close-in suburbs of Boston (Somerville, Arlington, Cambridge...). Boston's a good college town, so when you're around those areas people don't pull the corners of their eyes up or down when they see you, but you can get a muttered "damn *****" if you bump into someone wrong in other more sketchy parts. It's also one of the smaller cities, is walkable, good public transportation, good nightlife (although waiting in lines for clubs in winter? Never got that).
Generally people will express interest in you (single you out) if they don't really know many Asian Americans, in a good way, but also remember it's Boston, so it will often have an edge to it. I like to think Boston is the more avuncular version of New York, where they'll rib you and give you a hard time, but in fun. By the time I left in 2006 I was definitely noticing more and more Asian faces on the streets of Boston proper, especially compared to 1996. And there are enclaves where some people barely speak English, vis a vis Chinatown, because they don't need to.
Major Asian markets are pretty well established by this point, but you may have to drive a bit to get to one. I've heard that Quincy is the new Chinatown. Didn't get the sense that the food thing was that important to you, though. Or church? A handful of majority 2nd generation Asian American (mixed ethnicities) churches in the area.
The suburb suburbs are definitely nothing like California, though. I was once asked when I was going to start dating the only other Korean American girl in my high school class. Compare that to my wife's experience growing up in the Bay Area where she had fewer white friends than Asian, and people knew the difference between Taiwanese and Chinese.
As for the other places I've lived, don't go to Buffalo (even if the college population drives up the Asian percentage) or Reno. They are not what you are looking for. I found this post because my wife and I would dream of moving somewhere less crowded but still has enough Asians that my daughter won't have to grow up with an experience similar to mine and we can still get fresh, relatively inexpensive Asian groceries. Unfortunately we also have other limitations such as my wife's (in)tolerance for certain climates as a California girl. Hawaii too expensive, don't want to go to Canada mostly because it's too cold, Seattle risky for similar reason.. East coast like Fairfax would be a major move, and not sure how much my wife would like to be surrounded by Koreans though (she's Taiwanese American). It's interesting looking at the census report on Asian American demographics in the U.S. because they track single vs mixed ethnicity percentages. A few places you wouldn't really expect like Utah, IIRC.
What about areas of Southern metros like Raleigh or Atlanta, which have communities with high Asian percentage?
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Old 07-02-2015, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,317,013 times
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Originally Posted by caliguy92832 View Post
Are we considering greater metropolitan LA to be a mid-sized city now?
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Old 07-02-2015, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,316 posts, read 6,972,968 times
Reputation: 3503
Quote:
Originally Posted by yeabirfday View Post
I found this post because my wife and I would dream of moving somewhere less crowded but still has enough Asians that my daughter won't have to grow up with an experience similar to mine and we can still get fresh, relatively inexpensive Asian groceries. Unfortunately we also have other limitations such as my wife's (in)tolerance for certain climates as a California girl. Hawaii too expensive, don't want to go to Canada mostly because it's too cold, Seattle risky for similar reason.. East coast like Fairfax would be a major move, and not sure how much my wife would like to be surrounded by Koreans though (she's Taiwanese American). It's interesting looking at the census report on Asian American demographics in the U.S. because they track single vs mixed ethnicity percentages. A few places you wouldn't really expect like Utah, IIRC.
Hmm, not going all the way across the country you might consider Dallas and Houston. Dallas is a bit more Korean leaning. Houston would have more of the Taiwanese but might even be too hot. Both have their best ethnic offerings out in the burbs so unfortunately not walkable or close to good mass transit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yeabirfday View Post
It's interesting looking at the census report on Asian American demographics in the U.S. because they track single vs mixed ethnicity percentages. A few places you wouldn't really expect like Utah, IIRC.
Can you share a link? Thanks.
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Old 07-03-2015, 01:49 AM
 
Location: Suwanee, GA
116 posts, read 130,183 times
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I was in the same boat as the OP a year ago. I also have my own business and work from home, so I can live anywhere within the U.S. I ended up moving from a college town (Ann Arbor, MI) to northern Atlanta suburb. The town I live in, Suwanee, has about 20% Asian population, and that number is steadily increasing. It is very much a suburban lifestyle, but I enjoy it.

Frankly, Austin would have been my first suggestion had you not said you live there right now. You probably know better than anyone that Austin is much more than a college town. It's one of the fastest growing cities in the country, and there are plenty of white-collar Asians flooding in for the job opportunities. I am a first-generation immigrant from China, but personally I hardly ever feel out-of-place in all the various social situations I encounter. I've found out over the years that if I am less self-conscious about my race or my accent (thankfully it's mostly gone by now), others somehow seem more inclusive. Much of the change we seek can be found within ourselves.

Now if you were looking to move out of Austin for other reasons - the terrible Texas summer, bad breakup, too many baby mamas - that's another story. But from what you've mentioned so far, I would say give Austin another try with a more open mind before you make the decision to move. And if you really do decide to move, I'd say Duluth/Suwanee area is a top contender.
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Old 07-03-2015, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
3,300 posts, read 1,654,626 times
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Have you looked into Evanston, IL? It's a very cool suburban town, right on Lake Michigan. Even though the university is there, it's much more than a college town. It's super diverse, and there is a very sizable Asian population (a lot of non-immigrants). Plus you are so close to Chicago. Also you are right next to Skokie, a suburb which has a large established Asian (mostly Chinese I think) population. There are lots of professional Asian Americans in the Chicagoland area (mostly Filipinos and Chinese). Many of the Chicago suburbs have a 'mid size' city feel to them, but they are close to the city if you want more nightlife/ entertainment. The city has some cool Asian enclaves (Chinatown, argyle/Vietnamese area, Devon/ little India).

The only downside is the weather, and the state's overall economy is not great and the taxes are terrible, so from a business standpoint you'd have to make sure it would work for you. From a social standpoint, it would be a good fit for what you're looking for.
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Old 07-03-2015, 01:12 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,824 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
Can you share a link? Thanks.
http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/b...c2010br-11.pdf

Googled "asian americans census report", second link. The first says "DO NOT USE", I'm guessing bc it links to 2000 stuff. I think I originally found it through the third link, actually, from the CDC: CDC - Asian - Asian American - Populations - Racial - Ethnic - Minorities - Minority Health
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Old 07-06-2015, 02:19 PM
 
259 posts, read 325,331 times
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I know it might be surprising to people outside the area, but Columbus Ohio has a good-sized Asian population and is pretty welcoming of diversity. Due to a large research university (Ohio State), many Asian families came for school and settled in the area and continue to do so. There is also a big Japanese population due to the Honda headquarters. One suburb (Dublin) have about 20-40% Asian and South Asian population in the schools.

I would think that acceptance in your career might depend on the industry you work in, but in some fields here, diversity is really seen as a corporate asset and being Asian would not be a problem at all.

I am white but my husband, kids and inlaws are Asian.
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