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Old 05-31-2015, 09:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
In terms of the landscape and historical ties, the Midwest. In terms of the lifestyle and quality of life/economy and demeanor of the people, the West because they are both more urban and mixed-race while the Midwest and South are mostly white with some black.
Sorry, I should have quoted this post with my response to 2e1m5a's, but I failed to see your post until just now.

I actually find the Northeast to be more similar, in both landscape and history, to the South rather than the Midwest, as 2e1m5a argued in terms of history. I'm actually interested in reading why you think historical ties are strongest between the Northeast and Midwest. Even recent history shows a connection between the Northeast and Southeast - many move from NY, NJ, MA, PA, CT to FL or NC. History I find to be obvious - Original 13 were all on the Eastern Seaboard (save for PA which is close enough anyway and still considered to be and always has been Northeastern). The first areas of this country were states all along the East Coast, no further west than PA. Landscape-wise, the South and Northeast both border the Atlantic while the Midwest does not. It has the Great Lakes but these are not oceans. No part of the Midwest shares an ocean with the Northeast, while the South does. While there are impressive areas of higher elevation in the Midwest, the Northeast and South share a mountain range (the Appalachians). The Northeast and South are heavily forested, too. While the South has more suburban subdivisions than the Northeast, there are still cities, towns, and neighborhoods as old as ones in the Northeast and I find them to be very similar to one another. Old colonial architecture, tree-lined neighborhoods, lots of trees in general.

Despite cultural differences and a lot of hate shared about the other region within each of the two, I actually find the Northeast and South to be very connected.

Culturally though, IMO the answer is clearly the immediate coastal West.
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Old 06-01-2015, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Before you hit the West, cultures seem most similar north-to-south as a dividing line in the eastern US. I thought New England reminded me more of where I grew up (Door County, WI) than anywhere else in the country outside MN-WI-MI, in a multitude of ways. The Northeast and Southwest still fight a war that's been over for generations and still seem at odds culturally, to me. At least in terms of New England, it very much resembes the northwoods where I grew up, with lighthouses and beaches and cliffs and thick forests and small white picket towns.
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Old 06-01-2015, 11:06 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
How is it the Midwest? I would pick the West, specifically the more coastal areas, as most similar to the major Northeastern metros like NY and Boston (what most people think of when they hear "Northeast" and where most of the population lives anyway). So I guess my answer would be Pacific Coast. High COL (especially coastal CA compared to Northeastern major metros), very liberal, the country's two biggest and influential cities (NYC and LA), important capitals (finance - NYC, tech - SF, entertainment - LA), etc.
Not all the Northeast is like NYC and Boston, it's not even half. Landscape, demographics and historical trends the west is very different. South is very different culturally. Midwest is closer, there's no big transition as you go westward into the Midwest; both the Northeast and Midwest are old regions, and old industrial regions.
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Old 06-01-2015, 11:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Not all the Northeast is like NYC and Boston, it's not even half. Landscape, demographics and historical trends the west is very different. South is very different culturally. Midwest is closer, there's no big transition as you go westward into the Midwest; both the Northeast and Midwest are old regions, and old industrial regions.
I realize that but the majority of the Northeast's population lives in the large metros and those metros and characteristics are probably what most people first think of when they hear "Northeast."
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Old 06-01-2015, 12:38 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I realize that but the majority of the Northeast's population lives in the large metros and those metros and characteristics are probably what most people first think of when they hear "Northeast."
NYC + Boston metros are still less than half the population. Don't think that matters, what the Northeast actually is like matters more than people's stereotypes of it. I'd guess that Chicago suburbs are somewhat closer to Long Island than Bay Area suburbs.
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Old 06-01-2015, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I realize that but the majority of the Northeast's population lives in the large metros and those metros and characteristics are probably what most people first think of when they hear "Northeast."
Even then, I would still say Boston, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh or Buffalo are more similar to Cleveland or Detroit than any city in the Western U.S. The "West" can be anything from Denver to Salt Lake City to Tacoma. The Midwestern cities share many of the same characteristics as Northeastern cities; they are simply not as old and tend to be less "ethnic."
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Old 06-01-2015, 01:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
NYC + Boston metros are still less than half the population. Don't think that matters, what the Northeast actually is like matters more than people's stereotypes of it. I'd guess that Chicago suburbs are somewhat closer to Long Island than Bay Area suburbs.
What about Philly?
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Old 06-01-2015, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Maybe Southeast. History wise places like Savannah and Charleston, New Orleans, St. Augustine, Richmond share a bond with Philly, Boston, NY, Baltimore, Albany. The 13 original colonies are in the Northeast and Southeast. Florida and North Carolina are filled with Northeast transplants. There are rowhomes in Richmond, VA. Atlanta likes to call itself the "New York of the South". Weather is more similar than people realize, except in Florida and near the Gulf of course. It is the closest distance wise to the main population centers of the Northeast.
Good points. There also used to be a lot of rowhomes in Norfolk as well prior to "urban renewal". Go to the recent pages of the Maryland vs. Virginia thread on the City vs. City forum to look at the pics
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Old 06-01-2015, 01:50 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
What about Philly?
Except Philly doesn't have a high cost of living, nor is it an important capital. It seems a better fit with the Midwest than West Coast in almost every way.
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Old 06-01-2015, 01:51 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Even then, I would still say Boston, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh or Buffalo are more similar to Cleveland or Detroit than any city in the Western U.S. The "West" can be anything from Denver to Salt Lake City to Tacoma. The Midwestern cities share many of the same characteristics as Northeastern cities; they are simply not as old and tend to be less "ethnic."
They tend to be lower population density, though that somewhat is a reflection of their newer age.
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