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Old 06-04-2015, 05:10 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
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I've always seen Atlanta as the Upper South. It's never been a place that was "deeply" southern.
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Old 06-04-2015, 07:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by mega man View Post
I've always seen Atlanta as the Upper South. It's never been a place that was "deeply" southern.
Most people see the entire state of Georgia as "Deep South" but I see your point a little. Atlanta is more similar to Charlotte or Nashville as opposed to Montgomery. It'd make better sense to call it "New South" over including it in the Upper South.
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Old 06-04-2015, 07:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Most people see the entire state of Georgia as "Deep South" but I see your point a little. Atlanta is more similar to Charlotte or Nashville as opposed to Montgomery. It'd make better sense to call it "New South" over including it in the Upper South.
"New South" isn't really a geographic region and is itself subject to some interpretation. For instance, after Atlanta, Birmingham epitomized the "New South" but people tend to think of it as "Old South" or "Deep South" these days (despite the fact that it was founded after the Civil War and never had slavery or a big agricultural economy).
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
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Originally Posted by fezzador View Post
Pretty much. While the "southern-ness" of Atlanta is somewhat diluted due to transplants and immigrants, it's still very much a Southern city at the end of the day. And why does he feel the need to leave Georgia? After Mississippi and possibly South Carolina, outstate Georgia is as Southern as it gets. There's plenty of smallish and mid-sized cities in Georgia that retain the majority of their Southern character.

Outside of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina.
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
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Originally Posted by Danny Buckhead View Post
It's geographically southern of course, and outside of Metro Atlanta most of GA is the same as Mississippi but the culture of Atlanta is no longer southern. I am a native and I remember when everyone had a desk accent as a kid and most folks were native southerners. That's gone. That's what I meant by southern. More southern culture, values, accents etc. I don't want "country" I'm a city boy. Contrary to popular belief not every man from Dixie is a "country boy" and you don't have to be a Yankee to be a city slicker. Ya see?
Care to provide some actual facts for this Mississippi claim? If anything, outside of GA would resemble SC. Also, certain parts of Atlanta are still southern.
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
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Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Most people see the entire state of Georgia as "Deep South" but I see your point a little. Atlanta is more similar to Charlotte or Nashville as opposed to Montgomery. It'd make better sense to call it "New South" over including it in the Upper South.
Charlotte and Nashville are both more southern than Atlanta. Atlanta is obviously geographically more southern. The only "New South" city that may have more transplants is Raleigh.
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:25 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cdw1084 View Post
Charlotte and Nashville are both more southern than Atlanta. Atlanta is obviously geographically more southern. The only "New South" city that may have more transplants is Raleigh.
Possibly. If I'm not mistaken, Atlanta was already a decent-sized city when the wave of transplants hit. Raleigh was tiny, the RTP boom started bringing in transplants during the 1960's which hasn't slowed down much. In this case, I feel like Raleigh is even more "northern influenced." Raleigh has never been the most southern of cities either, we're not Charleston or Montgomery (we'd probably be in the same neighborhood as Richmond, Northern Virginia, Nashville, etc).
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:28 AM
 
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I still don't understand how places in the South become considered less southern or even not in the South anymore when people from other regions move in, but when the same thing happens in other parts of the country, they retain there northern l or western status.

But, to the original question, I don't think the OP is going to find a place in the South with no non-Southern transplants, but the non-Southern influence may not be as strong. It sounds like you are looking for the latter. in that case, maybe central or northern Mississippi (away from Memphis) is what you are looking for.
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Calera, AL
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Originally Posted by cdw1084 View Post
Outside of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina.
There are pockets of Deep Southern culture in Alabama (i.e. around Montgomery), but overall, Mississippi's pure Southern-ness blows Alabama's out of the water. The northern half or so of the state is more of a mix of Southern and Appalachian culture, like much of Tennessee and Kentucky.
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Originally Posted by mega man View Post
I've always seen Atlanta as the Upper South. It's never been a place that was "deeply" southern.
What? The "Gone With The Wind" city has never been deeply Southern?

Georgia has always been seen as the Deep South IMO...although maybe Atlanta is the exception?
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