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Old 06-01-2015, 02:57 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,714,703 times
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I don't see how it could affect things like accents. It's not like watching YouTube is going to change the way you talk, unless you're absolutely obsessed with it. I think the Internet has been Americanizing the spelling of other English-speaking countries due to spell check, but that's not really relevant within the United States. Any decline of accents I think has more to do with cultural cringe and a desire to sound "neutral" or Californian than to the Internet, which is still mostly text based.

Aside from the fact you can learn about new fads faster and buy just about anything online, I don't see how it's contributing to a homogenous culture. I think TV and radio were a bit better at that since during their heyday they made it so everyone in the country was watching the same shows, listening to the same songs, etc. Nowadays there is more choice and I think this might actually boost regional preferences.

Taking music as an example I'd actually argue this country has become more Balkanized over the past 25 years. In the 80s there wasn't a huge difference between "Black" and "white" or "urban" and "country" music and people generally listened to similar music regardless of their ethnic heritage or how urban their environment was. Heartland rock was a lot more subtly different from glam metal than today's country music is from indie rock, and today's rap and R&B music is much more specifically catered to the black community than black artists in the 80s like Prince, Lionel Richie and Michael Jackson.

It seems like if anything that digital capitalism has become more adept at catering to regional niches.
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Old 06-01-2015, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10 posts, read 19,966 times
Reputation: 22
Edit: Sorry -- I posted this on the wrong thread
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Old 06-01-2015, 03:54 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,714,703 times
Reputation: 3526
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXDreamer View Post
I think this feeling is natural for a foreigner and is a result of the Outgroup Homogeneity Effect

Out-group homogeneity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ah yes, a bit like the Parallax effect, of things seeming closer when they are both far away, such as stars in a constellation.
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Old 06-01-2015, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,655 posts, read 4,597,333 times
Reputation: 2566
Different styles such as clothes, slang words, music, dances, ect that start off as a local thing quickly gets stolen by other regions because of the internet.
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Old 06-01-2015, 11:38 PM
 
5,835 posts, read 10,778,440 times
Reputation: 4427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
I don't see how it could affect things like accents. It's not like watching YouTube is going to change the way you talk, unless you're absolutely obsessed with it. I think the Internet has been Americanizing the spelling of other English-speaking countries due to spell check, but that's not really relevant within the United States. Any decline of accents I think has more to do with cultural cringe and a desire to sound "neutral" or Californian than to the Internet, which is still mostly text based.

Aside from the fact you can learn about new fads faster and buy just about anything online, I don't see how it's contributing to a homogenous culture. I think TV and radio were a bit better at that since during their heyday they made it so everyone in the country was watching the same shows, listening to the same songs, etc. Nowadays there is more choice and I think this might actually boost regional preferences.

Taking music as an example I'd actually argue this country has become more Balkanized over the past 25 years. In the 80s there wasn't a huge difference between "Black" and "white" or "urban" and "country" music and people generally listened to similar music regardless of their ethnic heritage or how urban their environment was. Heartland rock was a lot more subtly different from glam metal than today's country music is from indie rock, and today's rap and R&B music is much more specifically catered to the black community than black artists in the 80s like Prince, Lionel Richie and Michael Jackson.

It seems like if anything that digital capitalism has become more adept at catering to regional niches.
I would agree with this.
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