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Old 06-05-2015, 11:22 AM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,474 posts, read 14,316,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Ok, but across the country gulls are thick (and thickest) on beach areas. They can be found elsewhere, but if you're along Lake Michigan or the Atlantic shore regions, for example, they will be far more omnipresent than anywhere in the country inland. Many more people do in fact associate gulls, called "sea" gulls because of this fact, with beaches than "sand pipers."
Yes, I get that. I probably grew up across the lake from you, lol. I just associate pipers with beaches because of the fact that gulls can be found in sooo many other places. It's funny to see them fighting over scraps in a fast food parking lot in places that are basically landlocked with the exception of a nearby small lake or river.
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Old 07-02-2015, 05:10 PM
 
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Default Invasive species

My grandmother told me the gulls invaded the Great Lakes when the St. Lawrence seaway was opened. Which is worse, zebra mussels, Asian carp, or seagulls? I guess the native americans would answer 'the Europeans' ?
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Old 07-02-2015, 06:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Well, it's not. For one, the oceans are saltwater and the Great Lakes are freshwater. This changes the type of wildlife you find at each.

Interesting that there are seagulls at the Lakes. I've never thought of that possibility before. We generally have two types of seagulls at our beaches (from what I can tell/what I see), white and gray ones and these kind of brownish and white speckled ones. I admit I know next to nothing about birds. I'm sure different species of seagulls live in different parts of the country and at different types of bodies of water. Did a quick search of seagulls, wiki brought up MANY different types.
Have you ever been to a lake....Great Lake or not?
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Old 07-02-2015, 06:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lancelot linkdad View Post
My grandmother told me the gulls invaded the Great Lakes when the St. Lawrence seaway was opened. Which is worse, zebra mussels, Asian carp, or seagulls? I guess the native americans would answer 'the Europeans' ?
Your grandmother's memory is faulty....to say the least. The seagulls were here long before 1959...by centuries.

I grew up on an island in Lake Erie......there are pictures of my great-grand parents in the 1920s with seagulls in them. The Native tribes that lived here had a name for seagulls as well. (It was probably close to 'rat with wings'....but we digress.)

The Asian carp and Gobi are going to be the worst for the Lakes.
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Old 07-02-2015, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Austell, Georgia
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Not to derail this thread but there all over Salt Lake City as well. I was surprised since the lake doesn't have any living fish, just a small almost microscopic shrimp species.
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Old 07-02-2015, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Always been curious to see how far inland those birds might travel. Do you see them in Michigan and Wisconsin for example, near the lakes?
Most gull species aren't principally coastal birds; they can be found essentially anywhere on Earth near water.

You see gulls everywhere in Minnesota, especially in urban areas where they mill around parking lots and even harass picnickers or people just taking a walk.
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Old 07-03-2015, 01:17 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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I can't speak for other gulls but ring-billed gulls are inland. My town in Tennessee gets them at the lake from early December to the first week of March.

"These are the gulls you're most likely to see far away from coastal areasóin fact, most Ring-billed Gulls nest in the interior of the continent, near freshwater. A black band encircling the yellow bill helps distinguish adults from other gullsóbut look closely, as some other species have black or red spots on the bill."

Ring-billed Gull, Life History, All About Birds - Cornell Lab of Ornithology
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Old 07-03-2015, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
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Not only are there gulls in the Great Lakes, there are also many Cormorants as well.
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Old 07-03-2015, 08:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Not only are there gulls in the Great Lakes, there are also many Cormorants as well.
Also Herons and Bald Eagles. There are even a few pairs of nesting swans where my mother lives....they most certainly are escapees that went wild.
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Old 07-03-2015, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,397,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScarletG View Post
Have you ever been to a lake....Great Lake or not?
I think the answer is pretty obvious.

Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Not only are there gulls in the Great Lakes, there are also many Cormorants as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScarletG View Post
Also Herons and Bald Eagles. There are even a few pairs of nesting swans where my mother lives....they most certainly are escapees that went wild.
Yup, and pelicans and every (?) other sea bird. I've always seen swans, so I'm pretty sure they're native as well. Side note: if you want to talk big "exotic" birds, sandhill cranes are basically everywhere in Wisconsin now, and they look like dinosaurs out in the fields.
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