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Old 06-03-2015, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Always been curious to see how far inland those birds might travel. Do you see them in Michigan and Wisconsin for example, near the lakes?
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Old 06-03-2015, 06:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Always been curious to see how far inland those birds might travel. Do you see them in Michigan and Wisconsin for example, near the lakes?
Yes they are friggen everywhere on the lakeshores
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Old 06-03-2015, 07:06 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Always been curious to see how far inland those birds might travel. Do you see them in Michigan and Wisconsin for example, near the lakes?
Absolutely. Tons of seagulls along the Great Lakes. Too many if you ask me. But of course, they aren't real seagulls the way they are on the East Coast, since a Great Lake isn't the same as the ocean.
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Old 06-03-2015, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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To be specific, the Ring-billed gull are permanent residents of the lower Great Lakes (basically Erie, Ontario, and the southern half of Lake Michigan).

It's very common to call these seagulls, but there's actually no one species of gulls that are are actually named seagulls. But the one thing that all the species have in common is that they pretty much congregate where ever there is a large body of water and plenty of fish. The only real difference between species is usually appearance and behavior.
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Old 06-03-2015, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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I see them every morning on my run.
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Old 06-03-2015, 09:15 PM
 
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They are in Wisconsin, not just on Lakes Michigan and Superior. You can find them on Lake Winnebago, and on parking lots that have flooded with rain...they are a nuisance.
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Old 06-03-2015, 09:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
Absolutely. Tons of seagulls along the Great Lakes. Too many if you ask me. But of course, they aren't real seagulls the way they are on the East Coast, since a Great Lake isn't the same as the ocean.
Well, it's not. For one, the oceans are saltwater and the Great Lakes are freshwater. This changes the type of wildlife you find at each.

Interesting that there are seagulls at the Lakes. I've never thought of that possibility before. We generally have two types of seagulls at our beaches (from what I can tell/what I see), white and gray ones and these kind of brownish and white speckled ones. I admit I know next to nothing about birds. I'm sure different species of seagulls live in different parts of the country and at different types of bodies of water. Did a quick search of seagulls, wiki brought up MANY different types.
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Old 06-03-2015, 10:00 PM
 
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Seagulls' Habitats | Animals - mom.me

Seagulls don't discriminate between salt water and fresh water. The only kind I've seen in WI, are the gray and white ones.
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Old 06-04-2015, 03:52 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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Minneapolis and St Paul have tons of sea-gulls and can constantly be found around the many inland seas around here such as White Bear Sea, Sea Minnetonka and the Mississippi Sea as well as among hundreds of thousands of parking lot seas.

If we don't have seas, are those lakegulls? - StarTribune.com

we also got oysters and tiny lobsters too

Last edited by Ghengis; 06-04-2015 at 04:01 AM..
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Old 06-04-2015, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Half of those states are covered in sea gull droppings. There are too many of them up there. I don't like sea gulls whether I see them in Florida, over at Myrtle Beach or up in Michigan. They are nasty birds wherever they are found.
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