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Old 06-08-2015, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,296,838 times
Reputation: 1203

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
I came across this and found it fairly accurate, or at least in line with how I feel and what I've seen with water temps in Southern CA.

SWIMMING AND WATER TEMPERATURE INDEX

Generally you see much fewer people in the water when it's below 66.
Thanks for that. It really shows that people who think of SoCal beaches as "brutally cold" are either just exaggerating the fact that they don't prefer it, or just extremely intolerant of cool temperatures.

Another thing that is really surprising me is everyone's matter of fact statement that SoCal beach air temps are too cold, saying it never gets warmer than the mid 70's. As someone who has lived within a mile from the ocean in Orange County my whole life, I can tell you that is simply not true. San Diego is cooler by the ocean than areas further north because it faces west almost perfectly, with beaches in LA and OC facing more southwest and a few that face south. These beaches are noticeably warmer during the day than west facing shores. Upper 70's to low 80's is common throughout summer and early fall right on the coast in these places.

If you need that much warmth to stay alive and be comfortable, go back to your mothers womb.
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Old 06-09-2015, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,436 posts, read 2,199,664 times
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I find it ironic people make fun of Southern Californians for complaining about being cold in the winter and bring up the fact that they have to deal with snow and whatnot, yet complain about the Southern California beaches and say things like they're "not swimmable" and are "brutally cold." If millions of Southern Californians can jump into the water of the beaches here without a swimsuit, you (complainers) can, too. Not everyone swimming in the Pacific wears a swimsuit.
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Old 06-09-2015, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,524,701 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Yes the picture was Lake Superior. It was a year ago and the lake was declared "ice free" I think on June 6. Not sure when it became ice free this year. I lived in northern Michigan for years, and have also swam in the lakes when I was younger. Even as a young person they were cold, and really its kind of a crap shoot as far as water temp on beach. To get warm nice water on the lakes you need an extended warm period with no storms or wind to churn up the water. Just 6-8 feet below the surface the water is always hypothermic, even in August. If you go swimming in the gulf of Mexico or the Carolina shore you will realize that even on a good day the great lakes water is very cold. They are swimmable yes, but only the more cold tolerant do it. Milwaukee is more southern Lake Michigan and you do a bit better for water temp there then you do further north.
Right, I think there was some ice on Lake Superior (not Lake Michigan) a couple winters ago in late May during the harshest winter of my life (followed by a long, very cold spring). It is nowhere near normal on Lake Superior, let alone Lake Michigan, which is what you initially stated. The Lakes are completely different in many ways, including water temperatures.

I grew up in northern Door County, which is the northern side of Lake Michigan, and it was actually warmer than Milwaukee water on the Bay side, and only a slight difference on the Lake side. People swam all summer. People swim at the (very nice) far-north side Lake Michigan beaches in the UP. People swim in Lake Michigan. You weren't able to hack it, but let's not apply your standards to the countless folks dotting the beaches around the Lake every summer and fall.

Southern California beaches, likewise, are perfectly pleasant on a warm day for good chunks of the year. Lake Superior though is damn cold, and I'm pretty hardy. I've been swimming, but usually that's an Aug/Sept deal on a very hot day in certain locations (usually with a nice shallow harbor).
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Old 06-09-2015, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,927 posts, read 7,798,019 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Right, I think there was some ice on Lake Superior (not Lake Michigan) a couple winters ago in late May during the harshest winter of my life (followed by a long, very cold spring). It is nowhere near normal on Lake Superior, let alone Lake Michigan, which is what you initially stated. The Lakes are completely different in many ways, including water temperatures.

I grew up in northern Door County, which is the northern side of Lake Michigan, and it was actually warmer than Milwaukee water on the Bay side, and only a slight difference on the Lake side. People swam all summer. People swim at the (very nice) far-north side Lake Michigan beaches in the UP. People swim in Lake Michigan. You weren't able to hack it, but let's not apply your standards to the countless folks dotting the beaches around the Lake every summer and fall.

Southern California beaches, likewise, are perfectly pleasant on a warm day for good chunks of the year. Lake Superior though is damn cold, and I'm pretty hardy. I've been swimming, but usually that's an Aug/Sept deal on a very hot day in certain locations (usually with a nice shallow harbor).

I lived near Lake Superior for a number of years and yes it is normal for ice chunks and flows to survive into May. June??? no that should not happen. IT made the news last year when it happened because of it being an uncommon event. The amount of snow and ice up there is double the rest of the region. It is strange to have a 70 degree day and see ice flows on the lake, but that is not uncommon near Lake Superior. The Huron and Michigan lakes clear of ice a few weeks earlier in most years than does Superior.
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Old 06-09-2015, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,414 posts, read 10,716,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Return2Paradise View Post
Tar balls washed up on gulf coast beaches after the deep water horizon oil spill too, so we're not immune to the effects of man made disasters either. Both coasts have their pros and cons. California beaches are much more beautiful in my opinion, but the water is cold. Texas beaches aren't nearly as attractive and the water isn't clear, but the water is warmer. I don't really understand the contempt for California. I think a lot of folks disagree with the State's politics and are unable to separate that from the State's beauty and diversity, so they want to berate all aspects of it.

And that is where the Med blows away all US beaches. Beautiful climate with clear blue warm water. Plus a great culture and food to go along with the beaches. US beaches can't hold a candle to the Med in Europe. Sure the US has a few nice beaches scattered around FL, but the Med in Europe is a huge area chock full of beautiful beaches all around.
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Old 06-10-2015, 12:33 AM
 
3,218 posts, read 2,270,858 times
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Most people in the U.S. traditionally think of "the peak of summer" as June and July while here in Southern California, we have our peak of summer (meaning warmest avrage temperatures of the year) from mid August through early October. Our SST in Orange County are usually in the low 70s and we do get our fair share of heat waves with air temperatures in the 90s in the afternoon. Swimming at Laguna Beach feels just fine during the warm time of the year.

Growing up, humid heat was quite rare here but over the past 3 years, we've been having a few humid spells in late summer where it stayed warm and balmy into the late night hours.

It is early June and we are already having one of those "humid spells" as it's still in the 80s at 10:30PM after a cloudy but warm, rare muggy day here (High was 92 and the peak dewpoint was 71). I'm thinking if we're already having this type of weather in June, we will probably have a much warmer than normal summer and our SST might reach into the mid 70s again in late summer (like they did last year).

Although I grew up in Southern California, I have vacationed in tropical climates and enjoy them a great deal. I am looking forward to the upcoming warmth this summer.

I appreciate both the beauty of our rugged California coastline and our surf as well as the white sand and the clear, calm, and warm waters of the tropics.

I do admit anything in California north of Santa Barbara is unswimmable without a wet suit though.
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Old 06-10-2015, 01:17 AM
 
12,870 posts, read 10,962,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theraven24 View Post
I find it ironic people make fun of Southern Californians for complaining about being cold in the winter and bring up the fact that they have to deal with snow and whatnot, yet complain about the Southern California beaches and say things like they're "not swimmable" and are "brutally cold." If millions of Southern Californians can jump into the water of the beaches here without a swimsuit, you (complainers) can, too. Not everyone swimming in the Pacific wears a swimsuit.
IMHO cold water is more unbearable than cold air. When immersed in cold water you can start to go numb and feel truly chilled to the bone. I would know - I've been to Maine quite a few times where water temps are similar to Southern CA temps. Sometimes, especially if the air is chilly, it's hard to get in the water and enjoy it. Sometimes, it just takes a little time to get used to it. It depends. Moving around in the water usually helps.

At least in cold air/snow, you can bundle up and feel warm. When you're immersed in cold water wearing just a bathing suit, it's harder to feel warm. Cold water feels like a shock to the system.

Also to tom77falcons, I've been to Italy in late July (Amalfi Coast) and was surprised to find the water quite cold. Nice and clear though.
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Old 06-10-2015, 01:40 AM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,593,356 times
Reputation: 3543
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
IMHO cold water is more unbearable than cold air. When immersed in cold water you can start to go numb and feel truly chilled to the bone. I would know - I've been to Maine quite a few times where water temps are similar to Southern CA temps. Sometimes, especially if the air is chilly, it's hard to get in the water and enjoy it. Sometimes, it just takes a little time to get used to it. It depends. Moving around in the water usually helps.

At least in cold air/snow, you can bundle up and feel warm. When you're immersed in cold water wearing just a bathing suit, it's harder to feel warm. Cold water feels like a shock to the system.

Also to tom77falcons, I've been to Italy in late July (Amalfi Coast) and was surprised to find the water quite cold. Nice and clear though.
How is bundling up any different than putting on a springsuit? Other than the fact you need to bundle up each day for months on end just to perform ordinary tasks?
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Old 06-10-2015, 02:06 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,591 posts, read 26,009,115 times
Reputation: 9086
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
IMHO cold water is more unbearable than cold air. When immersed in cold water you can start to go numb and feel truly chilled to the bone. I would know - I've been to Maine quite a few times where water temps are similar to Southern CA temps.
How are they similar? According to NOAA waters off Maine are at least 5+ degrees colder in summer.
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Old 06-10-2015, 02:09 AM
 
12,870 posts, read 10,962,349 times
Reputation: 18091
Quote:
Originally Posted by nslander View Post
How is bundling up any different than putting on a springsuit? Other than the fact you need to bundle up each day for months on end just to perform ordinary tasks?
The poster I responded to I believe said that people commonly swim in the Pacific even without wetsuits, and that's what I was gearing my post towards.

You don't need to "bundle up" each day to perform tasks. I usually walk outside in the winter wearing just a Northface fleece, normal jeans or leggings, and boots or other wintery shoes like fur-lined moccasins or something. I usually don't even wear gloves, a hat, or scarf. I really only wear a snow jacket in the snow, when snow is literally falling from the sky and I have to be outside in it while it's falling, same with a hat. If I'm outside for a while when it's not snowing, then I'll wear gloves. And when you "perform tasks" like shoveling snow or playing a sport like hockey or skiing, even going for a walk, you actually get hot and want to take off layers.
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