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Old 06-19-2015, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
Reputation: 10533

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
I've lived in the Northeast and Northwest(besides FL) and have been to almost all states. I see no substantial difference in people (so they don't bother me much (in FL)). It is what it is, America in the 21st century.
The stereotypes I have heard about Floridians (and I'm admitting they are stereotypes) is they combine the worst aspects of the Northeast and the Southeast. Most notably that Floridians tend to be extremely selfish/self-absorbed people compared to most of the rest of the country.

 
Old 06-19-2015, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Nashville TN
4,925 posts, read 4,912,763 times
Reputation: 4778
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The stereotypes I have heard about Floridians (and I'm admitting they are stereotypes) is they combine the worst aspects of the Northeast and the Southeast. Most notably that Floridians tend to be extremely selfish/self-absorbed people compared to most of the rest of the country.
Thats mostly the Miami/South Florida area thou, and it is really bad but the rest of the state is about average in terms of self absorbed superficial people. Many aspects of Northern Florida are more like the Deep South like Alabama and Southern GA and the people are nothing like the transplants and internationals that live in Miami and parts of Tampa and Orlando, Florida has a weird mix of citizens so it that way this OP is right they are unique.
 
Old 06-22-2015, 12:40 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,046,833 times
Reputation: 2543
The problem with Florida and a couple of other states, namely Arizona and Nevada, is that everyone is from someplace else originally and there’s a total absence of multi-generational roots. This lends itself to a highly transient feel with fractured communities where little to no connection, kinship or commonality exists among locals.

Then, you have to contend with the huge sociological selection-bias among “people who move to Florida” that has all sorts of broader implications. For those of us who were raised in northern US states, we’re all too familiar with the typical personality type that’s generally attracted to Florida.

Someday, someone really ought to study and qualify the whole “moving to Florida” thing. It’s always been a state that everyone treats like a rental car. Since Florida isn’t really “yours,” so to speak, a certain uncommitted emotional aloofness is very common among residents there. Of course, this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE who moves to Florida from elsewhere, but it’s definitely the prevailing mindset.

I lived in Florida for 12 years, and in that time, I qualified the different types of people who move to Florida in five, non-mutually exclusive categories:

- Depressed, angry, deviant or just plain bizarre people who are on the run from their own sad, sometimes criminal existences, including a history of violence, sexual and/or substance abuse, legal battles/disputes, conning or deceiving others in business, etc. These people eventually realize that wherever they go, their problems will follow suit and their past will catch up with them.

- Delusional people who have irrational visions of perpetual vacation. Usually, these are the folks that suffer from the "grass-is-greener" effect and have romanticized Florida internally and to others for years prior to their move after, perhaps, only a few vacations to the state. They think every day will be sunny and spent at the beach underneath a palm tree. Boy, are these folks are in for a real letdown!

- Old people who already have most of their life behind them and are moving to Florida in retirement to live out whatever “good” days they have left, often returning to wherever they hailed from in their final years to be surrounded by their families.

- Mostly working and lower-middle class people from the Northeast who move into shiny new tract homes in gated communities, thinking they’ve arrived like the second coming of the Messiah. Before long, these people think they’re “rich” and begin behaving rudely because, in their minds, “rich” people are rude, even though most folks with family and long-time wealth are quite down-to-earth. The epitome of the "moving to Florida" type, IMO.

-“Normal” people who move here for work and/or school.

Needless to say, this isn’t an ideal cocktail for planting roots and building close-knit, engaged communities with civic pride and high social capital. Florida is a state where it's common to NOT know your neighbors.

That’s not to mention this interesting mix of transplants has a strong tendency to check their “hometown values” at the state line. While living in Florida, I witnessed absolutely horrid behavior among transplants, especially those from the Tri-State area, when interacting with cashiers, servers, bartenders and other service sector employees. I never witnessed anything even remotely comparable in any of the other five states in which I’ve lived. Driving habits are, far and away, the rudest, most aggressive in the entire country as well, hence the reason why Florida metro areas tend to rank as the most dangerous metro areas in the country for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists, respectively.

A lot of this has to do with the "tough guy" persona that's all too common in Florida. "Fuhgeddaboudit" mafioso-types from the Northeast, rednecks in the smaller towns and rural communities throughout the state, "ghetto" blacks and African-Americans, "macho" Hispanics, etc. Everyone in Florida seems to go out of their way to be "tough"--AKA rude, argumentative, combative, shrewd, ghetto or have some other variant of a "get-outta-my-way" attitude/mindset.

Try going to California, Georgia or Texas (other states in which I've lived) and telling locals, "This is how we do it where I'm from!" You wouldn't dare because, whether native or not, they're most likely going to put your sour attitude in check by telling you to go back to wherever the Hell you came from.

Thing is, Florida natives have long been outnumbered by transplants, and the few Florida natives that do exist tend to be shallow-rooted, as their parents were often born elsewhere themselves. That, plus many seem to move on to cities/states with more robust, diversified economies in adulthood, often returning to the state in retirement. FWIW, I’ve met far more Florida natives out West than I ever did in Florida.

However, I think this only scratches the surface as to why so much bizarre and “unique” news is generated from Florida. Unfortunately, there's a lot more to it.
 
Old 06-23-2015, 02:09 AM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,747,327 times
Reputation: 4208
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
The problem with Florida and a couple of other states, namely Arizona and Nevada, is that everyone is from someplace else originally and there’s a total absence of multi-generational roots. This lends itself to a highly transient feel with fractured communities where little to no connection, kinship or commonality exists among locals.

Then, you have to contend with the huge sociological selection-bias among “people who move to Florida” that has all sorts of broader implications. For those of us who were raised in northern US states, we’re all too familiar with the typical personality type that’s generally attracted to Florida.

Someday, someone really ought to study and qualify the whole “moving to Florida” thing. It’s always been a state that everyone treats like a rental car. Since Florida isn’t really “yours,” so to speak, a certain uncommitted emotional aloofness is very common among residents there. Of course, this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE who moves to Florida from elsewhere, but it’s definitely the prevailing mindset.

I lived in Florida for 12 years, and in that time, I qualified the different types of people who move to Florida in five, non-mutually exclusive categories:

- Depressed, angry, deviant or just plain bizarre people who are on the run from their own sad, sometimes criminal existences, including a history of violence, sexual and/or substance abuse, legal battles/disputes, conning or deceiving others in business, etc. These people eventually realize that wherever they go, their problems will follow suit and their past will catch up with them.

- Delusional people who have irrational visions of perpetual vacation. Usually, these are the folks that suffer from the "grass-is-greener" effect and have romanticized Florida internally and to others for years prior to their move after, perhaps, only a few vacations to the state. They think every day will be sunny and spent at the beach underneath a palm tree. Boy, are these folks are in for a real letdown!

- Old people who already have most of their life behind them and are moving to Florida in retirement to live out whatever “good” days they have left, often returning to wherever they hailed from in their final years to be surrounded by their families.

- Mostly working and lower-middle class people from the Northeast who move into shiny new tract homes in gated communities, thinking they’ve arrived like the second coming of the Messiah. Before long, these people think they’re “rich” and begin behaving rudely because, in their minds, “rich” people are rude, even though most folks with family and long-time wealth are quite down-to-earth. The epitome of the "moving to Florida" type, IMO.

-“Normal” people who move here for work and/or school.

Needless to say, this isn’t an ideal cocktail for planting roots and building close-knit, engaged communities with civic pride and high social capital. Florida is a state where it's common to NOT know your neighbors.

That’s not to mention this interesting mix of transplants has a strong tendency to check their “hometown values” at the state line. While living in Florida, I witnessed absolutely horrid behavior among transplants, especially those from the Tri-State area, when interacting with cashiers, servers, bartenders and other service sector employees. I never witnessed anything even remotely comparable in any of the other five states in which I’ve lived. Driving habits are, far and away, the rudest, most aggressive in the entire country as well, hence the reason why Florida metro areas tend to rank as the most dangerous metro areas in the country for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists, respectively.

A lot of this has to do with the "tough guy" persona that's all too common in Florida. "Fuhgeddaboudit" mafioso-types from the Northeast, rednecks in the smaller towns and rural communities throughout the state, "ghetto" blacks and African-Americans, "macho" Hispanics, etc. Everyone in Florida seems to go out of their way to be "tough"--AKA rude, argumentative, combative, shrewd, ghetto or have some other variant of a "get-outta-my-way" attitude/mindset.

Try going to California, Georgia or Texas (other states in which I've lived) and telling locals, "This is how we do it where I'm from!" You wouldn't dare because, whether native or not, they're most likely going to put your sour attitude in check by telling you to go back to wherever the Hell you came from.

Thing is, Florida natives have long been outnumbered by transplants, and the few Florida natives that do exist tend to be shallow-rooted, as their parents were often born elsewhere themselves. That, plus many seem to move on to cities/states with more robust, diversified economies in adulthood, often returning to the state in retirement. FWIW, I’ve met far more Florida natives out West than I ever did in Florida.

However, I think this only scratches the surface as to why so much bizarre and “unique” news is generated from Florida. Unfortunately, there's a lot more to it.
And what might that more, be? If all of Floridas personality issues can be narrowed down to the invading outsiders, than why do TRUE Floridians get the lionshare of disdain from the rest of the country?
 
Old 06-23-2015, 02:31 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
1,235 posts, read 1,357,453 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Living there is a different story. The heat/humidity is absolute hell.
I thought you moved back to Florida and "re-adjusted" ...?
 
Old 06-23-2015, 03:18 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
1,235 posts, read 1,357,453 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
I agree, CA is indeed unique too because they elected an i*iot actor for governor. Definitely unique..

Btw, the thread was about FL.. not CA.
I did not vote for Arnold but come on now Rick Scott...? He is a hayseed who founded a healthcare company that got its hands in that very popular Florida pastime: Medicare fraud. Pretty innovative stuff.

As for the this thread, the OP made a bold claim about Florida's so called "uniqueness" compared to the contiguous 48 states.

Yes, Florida has a beautiful coastline and that is about it. Maine's coastline is pretty as are many others. As was already mentioned, California has the highest point and lowest point in the continental USA and as the crow flies these are only about 100/150 miles apart.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post

The first Europeans arrived and explored FL first. Narvaez, De Soto, Ponce De Leon etc.. then you have the space program and its historical events.

FL was not uninhabited. Native Americans were established in these areas for 10000 or more years (with no A/C). Do some research.
Native Americans settled in all the other 48 states as well. And there is no Mesa Verde or anything of that scale in Fla's history.

Ok, so some European explorers came through Florida and most promptly left. Because it was hell on earth in those days. That is why there is not much human settlement from those days. It was considered uninhabitable swampland before the railroads and the widespread use of air conditioning.

St. Augustine is nice but we are talking about a city of less than 15,000 people in the nation's third most populous state. If Florida had more St. Augustine's it would be more interesting...but it is more Mickey Mouse than it is historical Spanish colonial settlement.
 
Old 06-23-2015, 05:13 AM
PDF
 
11,386 posts, read 10,510,871 times
Reputation: 6606
Quote:
Originally Posted by StreetLegal View Post
I thought you moved back to Florida and "re-adjusted" ...?
Yeah, not anymore. I re-adjusted for a little bit, and then fell right back off.
 
Old 06-23-2015, 08:09 AM
 
1,750 posts, read 1,630,158 times
Reputation: 1067
Quote:
Originally Posted by StreetLegal View Post
I did not vote for Arnold but come on now Rick Scott...? He is a hayseed who founded a healthcare company that got its hands in that very popular Florida pastime: Medicare fraud. Pretty innovative stuff.

As for the this thread, the OP made a bold claim about Florida's so called "uniqueness" compared to the contiguous 48 states.

Yes, Florida has a beautiful coastline and that is about it. Maine's coastline is pretty as are many others. As was already mentioned, California has the highest point and lowest point in the continental USA and as the crow flies these are only about 100/150 miles apart.




Native Americans settled in all the other 48 states as well. And there is no Mesa Verde or anything of that scale in Fla's history.

Ok, so some European explorers came through Florida and most promptly left. Because it was hell on earth in those days. That is why there is not much human settlement from those days. It was considered uninhabitable swampland before the railroads and the widespread use of air conditioning.

St. Augustine is nice but we are talking about a city of less than 15,000 people in the nation's third most populous state. If Florida had more St. Augustine's it would be more interesting...but it is more Mickey Mouse than it is historical Spanish colonial settlement.
FL has the most unique flora and fauna in the lower 48(land and sea combined).

There's 30000 lakes, springs, caves, rivers, reefs etc.. I pointed this out before: just because a place is of lower elevation, does not mean it's inferior to a place with mountains. There's a lot more than the coastline.

http://static.visitgulf.com/contents...p/760/1280/624

Mesa Verde? That's not in CA, is it? No comment about the gov or any governor. In my book they are all the same, just saying though, CA takes the case when it comes to voting for an id*ot.

FL was not uninhabitable. There were many Native American tribes throughout the "swamp-lands". Btw, the first waves of Spanish explorers all perished in the end. Of course, in the end, most Native Americans died due to diseases introduced by the European explorers.
 
Old 06-23-2015, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,318 posts, read 21,872,221 times
Reputation: 33476
gazing out onto the ocean or gulf is OK but Florida possesses the most boring and uninviting land mass in all of the US.

oh...and you've killed your reef and everglades long ago too, have a nice python infested swamp instead.
 
Old 06-23-2015, 09:06 AM
 
1,750 posts, read 1,630,158 times
Reputation: 1067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
gazing out onto the ocean or gulf is OK but Florida possesses the most boring and uninviting land mass in all of the US.

oh...and you've killed your reef and everglades long ago too, have a nice python infested swamp instead.

The Reef is alive and kicking, but how would you know from your CD screen?

Rare corals discovered in abundance of South Florida coast - Sun Sentinel


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xE5UhHvqadg

Stupidest comment I've seen lately.. "you've killed your reef" hehe..

Even the Everglades, despite invasive species are in good shape. Better worry about the tar balls washing up in CA.
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