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Old 06-14-2015, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
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Also in South Philly alot of urban professionals priced out of Center City are moving into into neighborhoods that were once heavily Italian and black/Asian respectively like East Passyunk Crossing and Newbold North and also in the northern part of of Pennsport which was traditionally Irish. Also Fairmount which was Polish in the 1970s/80s is now upscale and the tough heavily Irish/Polish neighborhoods of Fishtown and Manayunk both have seen heavy influxes of urban professionals, hipsters and other artsy types in recent years. The toughest area in SP-Point Breeze is now seeing gentrification
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Old 06-14-2015, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
I'm getting ready to move to South Philly in the next 2 weeks, give or take, and I've noticed that the area isn't as staunchly Italian as it once was. A lot of the Italians have moved out to the NJ and PA suburbs (where I currently live). While the area is still predominantly Italian, there is now a noticeable Latino (which I am) and Asian presence.

This got me to thinking, what other areas in cities around the country traditionally associated with one ethnic group (I.e. blacks in South L.A.) have undergone significant demographic changes within the past, say, 15 years? Could be due to gentrification, immigration, etc--cause doesn't really matter...

Feel free to also discuss positive/negative ramifications of such changes, as well.
According to my understanding South LA is changing from African American to Latino in recent years.
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Old 07-24-2015, 01:53 AM
 
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Mill Basin ten years ago was mostly white in southern Brooklyn. I can safely say that the neighborhood is predominantly West Indian now.My dad who is Haitian use to tell me how back in the 80s being black and walking around avenue U in the Mill Basin area was a death wish.Now I see Haitian, Jamaican, Trinidadian flags posted on these houses now.

Bensonhurst used to be one of the most well known Italian neighborhoods in Brooklyn. Now the Chinese have officially taken over. 18th Avenue, and 86th street under the D train are literally China Towns.

Sunset Park was overwhelmingly Puerto Rican, but Is now a Mexican hood. When I use to buy clothes from 5th ave when I was a kid I strongly remember the presence the Ricans had in that neighborhood.

Western Flatbush is still predominantly Haitian, but now its diverse with new gentrification and also a rapidly growing Mexican/Hispanic population.
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Old 07-24-2015, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
And listing Brooklyn as an "ethnic enclave" is just WAY too broad, given how many neighborhoods it contains.
But most of those neighborhoods are facing rapidly changing demographics.
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Old 07-24-2015, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Crown Heights
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Constantly changing ethnic demographics have always been the way things go in New York, though the sheer diversity of different people here now does dramatize it to some degree
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Old 07-24-2015, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Crown Heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
the obvious ones are harlem, ny and brooklyn, ny.
Actually I would say that the rate of demographic change is often much faster in poorer immigrant neighborhoods (one immigrant group replacing another) than in gentrifying ones where it's the wealthy displacing the poor (altough there are exceptions e.g. the Burg and Bushwick)
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Old 07-24-2015, 08:28 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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Originally Posted by otters21 View Post
Even though Beech view has a significant Latino/Mexican Population it is big enough to maintain much of it's Caucasion population without any large scale white flight. A lot of young urbanista folks are moving in because of affordabilty.
Well those neighborhoods transition better. The only neighborhoods that become ghettos are those that experience "white flight" when blacks and Hispanics move in, because property values crash when a large number of people move out. The fact that there's no mass exodus of white people from Beechview and Brookline leads me to believe that they'll become more diverse neighborhoods without becoming ghettos. Other examples of this in Pittsburgh are Highland Park in the East End, and Brighton Heights on the North Side. Both are middle-class black and white neighborhoods.
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Old 07-24-2015, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
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Philadelphia's Kensington ( east of Front St., west of Aramingo Ave., north of Lehigh Ave. and south of the road tracks/Juniata Park neighborhood) was a very militant white/Irish neighborhood up until around 1985. Since then the area has become predominately Hispanic along with some blacks and some remaining whites. Juniata Park itself rapidly went from a Irish neighborhood to a Hispanic one since the early to mid 1990s.. Much of the Lower Northeast, once an almost a lily white bastion has seen major influxes of minorities since that dreadful decade in regards to white flight that affected the city big time , the 1990s. During that same time period the west part of Overbrook ( the east part of OP has been black since the 60s )
and almost entirely Overbrook Park , traditionally Italian and Jewish respectively changed into predominately African American as well as the lower part of Southwest Philly including Elmwood and South Philly's Gray's Ferry both which were staunchly Italian and Irish.

Last edited by otters21; 07-24-2015 at 10:32 AM..
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Old 07-24-2015, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRIOT17 View Post
Mill Basin ten years ago was mostly white in southern Brooklyn. I can safely say that the neighborhood is predominantly West Indian now.My dad who is Haitian use to tell me how back in the 80s being black and walking around avenue U in the Mill Basin area was a death wish.Now I see Haitian, Jamaican, Trinidadian flags posted on these houses now.

Bensonhurst used to be one of the most well known Italian neighborhoods in Brooklyn. Now the Chinese have officially taken over. 18th Avenue, and 86th street under the D train are literally China Towns.

Sunset Park was overwhelmingly Puerto Rican, but Is now a Mexican hood. When I use to buy clothes from 5th ave when I was a kid I strongly remember the presence the Ricans had in that neighborhood.

Western Flatbush is still predominantly Haitian, but now its diverse with new gentrification and also a rapidly growing Mexican/Hispanic population.
Sunset Park also has a very significant Chinese/Asian population.
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Old 07-24-2015, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Crown Heights
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Sunset Park is functionally two neighborhoods, with the boundary roughly along 6th Avenue. To the West is predominantly Hispanic (mostly Puerto Rican and Mexican, the latter being more recent arrivals than the former) while to the East is predominantly Chinese (mostly Fuzhounese though with many other groups as well). On the main drags of both of those areas (4th or 5th Avenue in the West and 7th or 8th in the East) you will see very little influence of the other group, Hispanics or Chinese. That being said, the Chinese do seem to be making inroads on the southern end of 5th Avenue so I could see the whole neighborhood becoming more consistently Chinese within a decade or so.
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