U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-24-2015, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,400,713 times
Reputation: 2896

Advertisements

The TITLE and central theme of this thread: Cities that aren't surrounded by tons of suburban sprawl

Denver is not dense and is surrounded by all kinds of sprawl. It doesn't qualify for the central question. You keep posting about a corollary offshoot ("within nature 30 miles outside the city") which is true for all but a handful of cities in the entire US. What's the point?

Have we discovered a city greater than 100,000 in the United States yet? I don't believe so. But we've been bombarded with pictures of Denver, which again is on the other side of the spectrum from the OP, for what reason exactly?

I was actually interested in the central question here, but it's been derailed to the point of comedy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-24-2015, 02:26 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
The TITLE and central theme of this thread: Cities that aren't surrounded by tons of suburban sprawl

Denver is not dense and is surrounded by all kinds of sprawl. It doesn't qualify for the central question. You keep posting about a corollary offshoot ("within nature 30 miles outside the city") which is true for all but a handful of cities in the entire US. What's the point?

Have we discovered a city greater than 100,000 in the United States yet? I don't believe so. But we've been bombarded with pictures of Denver, which again is on the other side of the spectrum from the OP, for what reason exactly?

I was actually interested in the central question here, but it's been derailed to the point of comedy.
Bombarded? 4 pictures is bombardment? I got the idea from what someone posted regarding Chicago. We had those nice pictures of nei's of northern CA, but really SF? An MSA of about 6 miilion, of whom about 10% live in the city?

The title does not match the OP. I quoted the entire OP.

You are not required to participate in the thread, you know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2015, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,775 posts, read 1,773,768 times
Reputation: 3484
Salt Lake City, absolutely.

It's a metro area of over 1 million (2 million if you count Ogden and Provo), and it's about 15 minutes from the middle of the mountains, going east, maybe 30 minutes going west (to the desert), and.. well.. about 100 miles of suburban sprawl going north and south..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2015, 02:48 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,723,856 times
Reputation: 9029
Denver and other Western Cities would be perfect actually, their suburbs don't sprawl as much as Midwestern suburbs.

Of course you can still have a lot of sprawl and be close to nature, the Twin Cities have a lot of sprawl, but just not a lot of sprawl in the East.

You could be in Downtown Saint Paul and be here (Willow river state park; Hudson,WI) in a half hour.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2015, 02:53 PM
 
483 posts, read 423,143 times
Reputation: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Bombarded? 4 pictures is bombardment? I got the idea from what someone posted regarding Chicago. We had those nice pictures of nei's of northern CA, but really SF? An MSA of about 6 miilion, of whom about 10% live in the city?

The title does not match the OP. I quoted the entire OP.

You are not required to participate in the thread, you know.
Both Denver and San Francisco have lots of suburban sprawl, but SF is a lot less sprawling because of geography and protected open space in the Bay Area. Your statement that 10% of the Bay Area lives in the city is wrong and misleading, as I pointed out before. SF, Oakland, and San Jose are all cities and make up way more than 10% of the Bay Area. Much of the rest of the population lives in other urbanized areas (e.g. Berkeley, Hayward, Vallejo) or small towns surrounded by open space (much of Marin, the Peninsula, Lamorinda, etc.). The Bay Area has a smaller percentage of its population in traditional suburbs than the vast majority of metro areas, including Denver.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2015, 02:53 PM
 
2,639 posts, read 5,219,898 times
Reputation: 2352
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
I'm talking about cities where you can drive out of downtown and be in rural areas within 20-30 miles or so. Only cities with more than 100,000 residents, though. Does this exist?
You have identified a contradiction.

- You want a bunch of people who have decided to cram into an urban core.
- You want rural areas that are untouched.

Why the population requirement? It doesn't make any sense. Either you want rural America or you don't; or you want a high population or you don't. If you have to compromise one, pick.

Now, if you're open to the idea that it doesn't have to be one city, the Tri Cities of Washington collectively have over 100,000 residents, but it doesn't take anywhere near 20-30 miles to hit rural.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2015, 03:13 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by smashystyle View Post
Both Denver and San Francisco have lots of suburban sprawl, but SF is a lot less sprawling because of geography and protected open space in the Bay Area. Your statement that 10% of the Bay Area lives in the city is wrong and misleading, as I pointed out before. SF, Oakland, and San Jose are all cities and make up way more than 10% of the Bay Area. Much of the rest of the population lives in other urbanized areas (e.g. Berkeley, Hayward, Vallejo) or small towns surrounded by open space (much of Marin, the Peninsula, Lamorinda, etc.). The Bay Area has a smaller percentage of its population in traditional suburbs than the vast majority of metro areas, including Denver.
Denver, Boulder, Boulder County and Jefferson County Colorado have significant amounts of mountain land/open space. Much of the Denver metro population lives in other urbanized areas, e.g. Aurora, Lakewood (the MSA is called Denver/Aurora/Lakewood; Aurora has 300,000 people, Lakewood 150K); Arvada (109,000), Boulder (100K) with a major university), Centennial (103K) Thornton (124K), Westminster (109K). Metro cities at >50K include Broomfield (58K), and Castle Rock (51K). Littleton is 43K. Then there is the population living in small towns surrounded by open space such as Brighton, Erie, Louisville, Lafayette, Superior,, Golden (in 3 directions). Golden also has a major university.

Cities in bold are county seats, those in blue are "non-traditional" suburbs, e.g. have a downtown. Aurora doesn't have a "real" downtown, but it has many city-like attributes including a university campus.

Mountain Parks | Denver Parks and Recreation
https://jeffco.us/open-space/parks/
https://bouldercolorado.gov/osmp
Parks & Open Space
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2015, 06:42 PM
 
1,110 posts, read 909,893 times
Reputation: 1201
New Orleans is probably the best answer here
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2015, 06:51 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,917 posts, read 2,020,323 times
Reputation: 5880
One good predictor of this is the expense or availability of water supplies to service large lot residential properties. In arid regions of the Western US, water supply is even more of a factor than the wet eastern US, where it's been the norm to be able to carve out 1-5 acre Gentleman's farm lots with private wells/septic in the suburbs/exurbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2015, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,565 posts, read 10,280,522 times
Reputation: 9827
Anyone who thinks that Denver is sprawly has never been to Dallas-Fort Worth. The Metroplex is the epitome of sprawl.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top