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Old 07-08-2015, 08:01 AM
 
29,902 posts, read 27,345,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post

Louisville and Nashville are by far the coolest cities listed but make sure you either get a local guide or ask incessant questions before exploring. You will need at least a good week in each to check them out. Both cities are developing very cool "nook and cranny" type of urban neighborhoods that could be hard to find unless you are "in the know." IMO no city on the list has a neighborhood as awesome as the Highlands of Louisville (maybe LODO in Denver but that is just so much bigger of a city), and that is why it is the winner for me. Louisville would be best to visit during a festival which are frequent. I strongly recommend Forecastle July 17-19 (coming up!). The St James Art fair the first weekend in October also gives you a sense of what the city is all about. Also, Nashville has gotten so BIG. Louisville still feels like a small town big city. It is very clean, but its urban areas also have a lot of "old school" industrial "grit." In this way, it is very much like New Orleans. The best way to explore the cities is to stay at a couple different hotels, a couple different airbnb spots in different neighborhoods, and walk and eat your way around the city. I can provide an excellent guide should you choose to check Louisville. Louisville also has several city tour buses and city taste food tour which is pretty good. Make sure you check an urban distillery out to get a feel for the direction the city is moving (bourbon and food based tourism) Louisville's only downsides for me are allergies and air quality.
You may not be as familiar with Richmond, but definitely belongs in the "coolest" category along with Louisville and Nashville IMO.
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Old 07-08-2015, 08:51 AM
 
6,552 posts, read 13,750,608 times
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You may not be as familiar with Richmond, but definitely belongs in the "coolest" category along with Louisville and Nashville IMO.
I agree. Nashville is the coolest, with Louisville a shade behind, and then Richmond is up and coming. I was surprised by the activity, vibrancy, and coolness of the Fan. I was in Richmond last year after not being there for almost 10 years and it has really really improved. Great eats too.
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Old 07-08-2015, 10:07 AM
 
29,902 posts, read 27,345,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
I agree. Nashville is the coolest, with Louisville a shade behind, and then Richmond is up and coming. I was surprised by the activity, vibrancy, and coolness of the Fan. I was in Richmond last year after not being there for almost 10 years and it has really really improved. Great eats too.
I think Richmond is at least on par with Louisville here, if not just a bit above it. Both are pretty underrated though.
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Old 07-13-2015, 09:49 AM
 
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It seems like the last few of you believe that Louisville, Richmond, and Nashville should rank in the top 3 out of the choices I mentioned. Do you have reasons as to why? Or just personal experience?
Thanks!
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Old 07-13-2015, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,655,251 times
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The OP will not be able to find a house in her price range as she is describing in her title in a Portland neighborhood. If she wants the suburbs she might be able to swing it though.
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Old 07-13-2015, 11:29 AM
 
141 posts, read 127,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by behindblueyes97 View Post
So I am looking to relocate to a medium-sized city, and the following criteria are important to me in order of most to least importance: bikeable, affordable, young professionals, tree-dense, and liberal
Medium-sized to me is population around 200,000.
Affordable to me is houses for sale between $150,000 - $250,000
Young Professionals to me are people between 25 and 35 with a college education working in a salaried field.
I'd prefer a moderate climate (like Seattle), but if nothing else, nothing as cold as Chicago. Heat is okay as long as there are trees.
Jobs aren't a big deal because I can work remotely.

I've lived and visited a fair number that meet some or all of those criteria, so here's why they didn't work out:
Eugene, OR - Perfect except very few young professionals who are permanent residents
Seattle, WA - too expensive and population dense and too hilly to bike/lack of separate bike lanes
Madison, WI - too cold
Sacramento, CA - no good parks near downtown and lacking the vibe I was looking for
Atlanta, GA area - sprawling metropolitan area makes your life car dependent for visiting friends/family/commute/etc
Athens, GA - too college-oriented
Chapel Hill, NC - not so bikeable due to hills and lack of separate bike lanes, didn't really like the vibe here either
Asheville, NC - Loved the culture, arts, and outdoors here, but too small
Charleston, SC - Loved the culture, vegan food, and bikeability here, but too small and no trees
Chattanooga, TN - too small & family oriented, not a lot going on

Thanks so much for any help!

Austin, Texas. Sounds perfect.
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Old 07-13-2015, 05:30 PM
 
6,552 posts, read 13,750,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by behindblueyes97 View Post
It seems like the last few of you believe that Louisville, Richmond, and Nashville should rank in the top 3 out of the choices I mentioned. Do you have reasons as to why? Or just personal experience?
Thanks!
Because you mentioned places you like and you loved Asheville. Louisville is like that but 3 times bigger,more culture, more museums, more world class festivals. More to do. And it still meets all your needs. Come stay at an airbnb in a walkable, urban part of Louisville and give it a whorl. I will be happy to give you a tour if you PM me. I am always driving around looking for new real estate, so it is no problem.
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Old 07-13-2015, 06:07 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,716,353 times
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Eugene is pretty cool, but it's not a good city for professionals IMO. Unless you want to set up a bead shop or something.
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Old 07-18-2015, 09:59 PM
 
1,512 posts, read 7,266,606 times
Reputation: 1122
Quote:
Originally Posted by behindblueyes97 View Post
So I am looking to relocate to a medium-sized city, and the following criteria are important to me in order of most to least importance: bikeable, affordable, young professionals, tree-dense, and liberal
Medium-sized to me is population around 200,000.
Affordable to me is houses for sale between $150,000 - $250,000
Young Professionals to me are people between 25 and 35 with a college education working in a salaried field.
I'd prefer a moderate climate (like Seattle), but if nothing else, nothing as cold as Chicago. Heat is okay as long as there are trees.
Jobs aren't a big deal because I can work remotely.

I've lived and visited a fair number that meet some or all of those criteria, so here's why they didn't work out:
Eugene, OR - Perfect except very few young professionals who are permanent residents
Seattle, WA - too expensive and population dense and too hilly to bike/lack of separate bike lanes
Madison, WI - too cold
Sacramento, CA - no good parks near downtown and lacking the vibe I was looking for
Atlanta, GA area - sprawling metropolitan area makes your life car dependent for visiting friends/family/commute/etc
Athens, GA - too college-oriented
Chapel Hill, NC - not so bikeable due to hills and lack of separate bike lanes, didn't really like the vibe here either
Asheville, NC - Loved the culture, arts, and outdoors here, but too small
Charleston, SC - Loved the culture, vegan food, and bikeability here, but too small and no trees
Chattanooga, TN - too small & family oriented, not a lot going on

Thanks so much for any help!

Have you tried Charlottesville and Richmond, Virginia?
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Old 07-19-2015, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
9,745 posts, read 14,179,292 times
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Nashville is bike friendly? It must have improved substantially in the last few years. I just moved west about four years ago and at the time I wouldn't have called it particularly bike friendly.
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