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Old 06-28-2015, 08:51 AM
 
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The people are similar, although I think Canadians are generally nicer/more polite across the board...that's GENERALLY, just in case someone doesn't understand. There are Canadian *******s just like American ones, and there are Americans that are just as nice or nicer/more polite than the nicest Canadians. But I have generally found Canadians to be more similar to the British with their courtesy and politeness. Lots of Americans are that way too, but lots aren't.

 
Old 06-29-2015, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
The people are similar, although I think Canadians are generally nicer/more polite across the board...that's GENERALLY, just in case someone doesn't understand. There are Canadian *******s just like American ones, and there are Americans that are just as nice or nicer/more polite than the nicest Canadians. But I have generally found Canadians to be more similar to the British with their courtesy and politeness. Lots of Americans are that way too, but lots aren't.
I agree with some of this. Canadians do tend to be more polite, more reserved than do US residents. Actually people in the Upper Midwest of the US are like this to some extent as well. Canadians are very friendly and so are Americans IMO. International visitors to North America almost always say that about both the US and Canada. They also see far more similarities between us than we do, as we American or Canadian are looking for the differences for some reason. What Americans do tend to be is more laid back and open than Canadians, but again that depends on what part of the US you are in and what part of Canada you are in. Some parts of the US would be indistinguishable with Canada to people from outside North America. Anyone who has ever been to Minnesota, Michigan or parts of Ontario knows this is true.
 
Old 06-29-2015, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Montreal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Minnesota accents sound Canadian-ish, and I'm sure Maine is very similar to Nova Scotia or Quebec. There are some connections between Toronto and Buffalo, and I'm sure there are also connections between Vancouver and Seattle. The majority of Canada's population lives within 100 miles or so of the US border, they're not very different from us.
And Vermont too... both Maine and Vermont high schools regularly feature French as a second language in high school. NH however is more conservative than VT or ME (and QC/NS, despite QC becoming more fiscally conservative).

Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Some parts of the US would be indistinguishable with Canada to people from outside North America. Anyone who has ever been to Minnesota, Michigan or parts of Ontario knows this is true.
And perhaps it is a little abusive but if I was to market Minnesota's physics PhD program, I would say that the transition to Minnesota from a Canadian undergrad is likely to be easier than transitioning from a Canadian undergrad to almost any other US PhD program (in cultural and weather terms, assuming that the student found the right supervisor-project combination) as a selling point.
 
Old 06-30-2015, 01:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Yvanung View Post
And Vermont too... both Maine and Vermont high schools regularly feature French as a second language in high school. NH however is more conservative than VT or ME (and QC/NS, despite QC becoming more fiscally conservative).
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That's unfortunate. They are eating the libertarian poison too?
 
Old 06-30-2015, 07:40 PM
 
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I've often wondered if Canadians get upset when people mistake them for Americans, because I'm sure that happens all the time.
 
Old 06-30-2015, 09:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
I've often wondered if Canadians get upset when people mistake them for Americans, because I'm sure that happens all the time.
I taught in London for a year with a group of about 40 teachers, some of them Canadians. They really bristled when we were called the "American teachers" and always were careful to distinguish themselves as Canadian. I'm not sure it they were offended by their inclusion with the Americans but they definitely made sure to correct anyone who mistook them as such. But they were always very polite in doing so.
 
Old 07-01-2015, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Montreal
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In fairness many Americans living in Southern states will get a culture shock coming to Alberta, let alone Quebec, whereas the culture shock is likely not to be as intense for those living in more northern states (assuming, in all cases, that one moves from and to neighborhoods with similar resident socioeconomic status)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
That's unfortunate. They are eating the libertarian poison too?
Left-right in Quebec politics is framed primarily in terms of economic issues at present.

Socially it's still a rather liberal place.
 
Old 07-01-2015, 07:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yvanung View Post
In fairness many Americans living in Southern states will get a culture shock coming to Alberta, let alone Quebec, whereas the culture shock is likely not to be as intense for those living in more northern states (assuming, in all cases, that one moves from and to neighborhoods with similar resident socioeconomic status)



Left-right in Quebec politics is framed primarily in terms of economic issues at present.

Socially it's still a rather liberal place.
Going from one large city to another is not that shocking, whether it's in Canada or Northeastern US. It's not as different as you might think, even for us southerners. We get out too now and then.
 
Old 07-02-2015, 09:16 AM
 
Location: The South
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
I've often wondered if Canadians get upset when people mistake them for Americans, because I'm sure that happens all the time.
I did a cruise that had a fair number of Canadians on board. They were very easy to pick out, each one had a tee shirt loudly proclaiming "I AM CANADIAN". So yes, I suspect they get upset.
 
Old 07-02-2015, 07:07 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,948,587 times
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Canada has rednecks too. People just call them "hosers" up there.
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