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Old 06-18-2015, 10:30 AM
 
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The U.S. educational system, to the great benefit of the U.S., was more German than English.

The use of Leibniz calculus as opposed to Newtonian calculus, I once read, gave U.S. engineers and scientists an advantage over their peers in the U.K.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prussi...ion_system#USA

http://ugrad-conf.fitchburgstate.edu...ath-Poster.pdf

In this respect, German culture greatly influenced the U.S. and put it on a different trajectory than the U.K.

In fact, the U.S. may owe its independence to Prussia in a little-known way. Baron von Steuben taught the Continental Army to fire its muskets in a faster method than used by the British, discarded the elitism of British officers, and taught the Continentals to use the bayonet effectively. After Valley Forge, I don't think Continental regulars ever lost a major battle to the British, especially when they were the primarily combatants (e.g., especially Monmouth Court House, the last major battle in the northern theater, and the Cowpens, a small but very decisive battle that led to Yorktown and where the Maryland Continental line mauled the 71st Highlanders).

Baron von Steuben

The Steuben Society of America

American history often says that the Continentals defeated the most powerful army in the world. This is highly fallacious. It's doubtful that the British Army would have defeated the top European armies, especially the Prussians. What made the British the most powerful military force in the world was its dominant navy.

The infant American nation was blessed to have a clear-minded Prussian shape its army into an effective weapon able to wrench independence from the British crown.

Apart from the language, it would be interesting to ask what part of the British culture was retained by the U.S. Representative democracy certainly is one very important British concept integral to American culture. Yet the U.S. with its Bill of Rights, still unique in the world, and an elected head of state, transcended the British concept. Arguably, the scientific method is a British idea, and extremely important to the development of the U.S.

The American language and culture is very much a melting pot of many nations, a competitive stew in which the best of many cultures was rapidly assimilated.

Last edited by WRnative; 06-18-2015 at 10:49 AM..

 
Old 06-18-2015, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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If I had to pick one, it would be English, but it also depends on the region. Besides speaking English, there's pretty much no trace of significant English influence in California.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theraven24 View Post
If I had to pick one, it would be English, but it also depends on the region. Besides speaking English, there's pretty much no trace of significant English influence in California.
There's so much English influence around us that we don't think about it. It goes beyond the language. Where do you think common law came from? English influence is all around us in plain sight but is ironically not so obvious to most people.

Then there's this matter.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AprzF5_6hGs


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6nwidAdH4A
 
Old 06-18-2015, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,510,898 times
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For the enlightenment of anyone upset about bi-lingual or multi-lingual societies who happens to turn up here, it might be noted that the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania required many official documents to be printed in German, as well as English, until some time in the 1850's. So adding an additional language in order to facilitate, rather than impede communication and commerce, is nothing new.

All other factors being equal, a diverse. but balanced team of individual will, outperform a "skewed" team of the same background any day -- no shared quirks, hang-ups, and prejudices getting in the way.

Americans of mostly-German extraction operate under a unique set of rules and circumstances; the English and German cultures are close enough that some of the difference aren't even noticeable. But many German-Americans came here to avoid persecution and stagnation, and at a relatively late date in historical context (most of mine came here after the wasted bloodshed of the Napoleanic Wars and the failed revolution of 1848). And the Germany they left behind continued to deteriorate.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 11:26 AM
 
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English of course. There can be German influence in some area but the Anglo/English heritage is too deep and spread everywhere. It's basically mainstream American culture.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 11:32 AM
 
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The East Coast is definitely more influenced by Britain, just look at the names of cities/counties in areas like Massachusetts, Virginia, and the Carolina's. The NYC area is very much influenced by Italians and Irish, but look at names of the boroughs and different areas. Kew Gardens in Queens might be the best example, very British.

Germany influenced areas like Pennsylvania and the Midwest, but I really can't see how Germany had a stronger influence over Britain when we look at the whole nation. Not even along the East Coast or the South, many folks in states like Utah, California, and Washington claim British ancestry.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,436 posts, read 2,124,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
There's so much English influence around us that we don't think about it. It goes beyond the language. Where do you think common law came from? English influence is all around us in plain sight but is ironically not so obvious to most people.

Then there's this matter.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AprzF5_6hGs


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6nwidAdH4A
I stand by my statement that for the most part, California is not influenced by English customs.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA
1,196 posts, read 4,341,328 times
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Most of the Midwest is more German, but other than that it is definitely English.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 11:55 AM
 
4,995 posts, read 7,313,860 times
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Neither.

British and German culture are becoming more like the US.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theraven24 View Post
I stand by my statement that for the most part, California is not influenced by English customs.
Right. Except for its laws and a language spoken by the majority of its residents.
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