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Old 06-18-2015, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,436 posts, read 2,122,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Right. Except for its laws and a language spoken by the majority of its residents.
I already said that.

 
Old 06-18-2015, 12:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
There's so much English influence around us that we don't think about it. It goes beyond the language. Where do you think common law came from?
Common law is an excellent point.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 12:49 PM
 
350 posts, read 607,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdave01 View Post
Most of the Midwest is more German, but other than that it is definitely English.
Used to be German is more appropriate in my opinion. Other than the large percentage of German ancestry and some cultural things. I think even most Americans of German ancestry are closer to the UK than Germany nowadays.

Some people really think the Midwest is closer to German culture than Anglo American culture?
 
Old 06-18-2015, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Washington State
18,465 posts, read 9,561,235 times
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English for the large majority of the USA but because we have such a large population of German heritage, there are many areas which has a Germanic feel in the community.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,257 posts, read 26,226,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
English for the large majority of the USA but because we have such a large population of German heritage, there are many areas which has a Germanic feel in the community.
What does that even mean? I can see people saying that certain parts of the Boston or New York metro areas have an "Irish" feel given IRA support and continued immigration from Ireland. I can't recall too many articles about a German-American lobby trying to get Congress to "legalize the Germans."


http://c1.thejournal.ie/media/2013/0...rt-390x285.jpg

Even with its large Irish population, I wouldn't say Boston feels anything like Dublin.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 01:05 PM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,294,870 times
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There have been German influences….

However, the British established a template that others would assimilate towards. The English language would be the most obvious example. A legal system based on British Common Law. The electoral system known as First Past The Post, also known as Single Member Plurality (the one with the most votes wins all).

In a general way, a society that is (or until recently was) Protestant majority.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 01:11 PM
 
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American music has been heavily shaped and influenced by German-Austrian traditions. Consider that even Handel was German.

John Philip Sousa was trained in this tradition.

I think we emphasize the British influence partly because we generally speak English.

Consider, however, if were as English as the Canadians, our political system, culture and history, would be much different than it is today.

Most Americans don't even realize that Queen Elizabeth II is the monarch of Canada, because the concept is so foreign to us and we consider the Canadians to be more like us than the British!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchy_of_Canada

Toronto IMO feels much more like London than does an American city, despite Canadian accents, the presence of MLB baseball, NBA basketball, and American-like football. After all, Canada is an imperial remnant, with a French-speaking province.

In many ways, the U.S. and Great Britain have evolved together, and the "special relationship" is very real. The amount of social interchange between the U.K. and the U.S. would have stunned the Brits of the Revolutionary War period. Who would have imagined that the greatest British prime minister, Winston Churchill, would be half American.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Relationship

However, Churchill, unlike most Americans, was a committed imperialist.

Otto Van Bismarck, the great German statesman, famously remarked that "the most important fact of the modern world is that Britain and America speak the same language." This observation certainly proved prophetic, perhaps because the common language increased the British understanding of America. This superior grasp of American politics compared to the Germans was evidenced by the Zimmerman Telegram, which helped precipitate the entry of the strongly isolationist U.S. into WWI, over the heated objection of most of the many German-Americans. German-American opposition to WWI was so pointed that farmers were exempted from the draft, to pacify the great numbers of German-American farmers.

https://news.google.com/newspapers?n...,4644099&hl=en

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zimmermann_Telegram

Personally, I think the U.S. "Friendly Invasion" of the U.K. influenced British culture significantly. As the Atlantic Ocean soon after became "the pond" with jet travel, our cultures merged to such a degree that we assume the modern American culture was shaped by the British, never considering that the opposite likely is more true. After all, the Beatles were as much as a creation of American culture as U.S. culture.

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-20160819

An interesting question today is how, apart from out different political and legal systems, how did British and American cultures differ? Our entertainment industries and even our news media have largely merged. That would have been a more shocking question prior to WWII, or prior to the advent of cable or the internet. Certainly, the common language is the great highway that facilitates that interaction.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...lies-WWII.html

Last edited by WRnative; 06-18-2015 at 02:16 PM..
 
Old 06-18-2015, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,257 posts, read 26,226,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WRnative View Post
American music has been heavily shaped and influenced by German-Austrian traditions. Consider that even Handel was German.
And Broadway musicals were heavily shaped and influenced by Jewish Americans...

Mainstream popular music today is heavily shaped and influenced by African Americans...

And on...and on...
 
Old 06-18-2015, 02:18 PM
 
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Default Largest self-reported ancestry group in the U.S.

I didn't know that German-Americans were the largest self-reported ancestry group in the U.S. I haven't read this article, but it appears excellent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=German_American
 
Old 06-18-2015, 02:43 PM
 
7,906 posts, read 4,868,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
And Broadway musicals were heavily shaped and influenced by Jewish Americans...

Mainstream popular music today is heavily shaped and influenced by African Americans...

And on...and on...
Many of the Jewish-American composers, such as Copland, Richard Rodgers, and the Gershwins, were trained in the German-Austrian traditions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubin_Goldmark

https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Rich..._and_education

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Damrosch

I said that America is a great melting pot of cultures.

However, when it comes to music, the German-Austrian tradition trumps that of the U.K. by a significant margin. The German-Austrian tradition is integral to American music.

Of course, we have the likes of Irving Berlin, who just knew how to spin a great tune but couldn't write music, and George M. Cohan with little formal musical training.

In Cleveland, the German-American Hruby family was instrumental in making possible the city's musical mecca in University Circle.

Video: The Cleveland Orchestra Residency; The Hruby Family | Watch Applause Online | WVIZ/PBS ideastream Video

Music was so centric to the German-Austrian culture that it's certainly one of the great Germanic cultural contributions to America.
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