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Old 06-18-2015, 02:49 PM
 
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I feel like this thread should have had a poll...

 
Old 06-18-2015, 03:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cnd33 View Post
I feel like this thread should have had a poll...
Note the original question is in the present tense. I can't imagine that the U.K. wouldn't overwhelmingly win any poll, as the two cultures are much more similar today, especially given the common language. Consider how many Brits are common cultural icons in the U.S. They even host American television late night programs!

In fact, I'm surprised anybody even raised this issue.

My posts about Germanic cultural influences in the U.S. were primarily to reflect the great cultural contributions made by Germany to the American culture.

A better question might be about the culture of the U.S. relative to Germany, France, Italy, China, Canada, etc. I'm not certain how many of us could answer that question or would have opinions.

This thread has made me think about what a profound impact that Germany has had on the U.S. With the assimilation of German-speakers into our English-speaking culture, we sometimes forget about the major contributions of Germans to our cultural melting pot.
 
Old 06-19-2015, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
What does that even mean? I can see people saying that certain parts of the Boston or New York metro areas have an "Irish" feel given IRA support and continued immigration from Ireland. I can't recall too many articles about a German-American lobby trying to get Congress to "legalize the Germans."


http://c1.thejournal.ie/media/2013/0...rt-390x285.jpg

Even with its large Irish population, I wouldn't say Boston feels anything like Dublin.
Just a few, from when I grew up (NE WI):

1. German language is spoken, and fairly commonly. Some places spoke German for 5 generations: The Wisconsin Town That Didn't Learn English for Five Generations | Mental Floss
2. There are polka bands. Everywhere. They dress in old Euro garb sometimes. They sing with German and Polish phrases. They do old German numbers. There is a polka TV show every Sunday broadcast from Green Bay that was there when I was a little kid (40 years ago) that is still on the air every week. Some people wear German clothes.
3. As a kid, when I went to church and people were in their Sunday best, many men (including all my older relatives) wore this type of German hat during cold weather:


4. Barbeque in (especially) eastern Wisconsin means one thing - bratwurst. On a hard roll with sauerkraut. With German potato salad.
5. The whole beermaking tradition. Milwaukee was once the beer capital of the world: Milwaukee: Beer Capital of the World. All the Oktoberfests around the state.
6. The whole German socialist political tradition. Wisconsin elected the first socialist member to US Congress via the German socialist party (see link at end of #6). Milwaukee is the only major US city to elect a socialist mayor, which they did several times. "Milwaukee was, among other things, an enclave of German-American radicalism, with some 24% of the city German born in 1895. It was there that the American Socialist movement sank deep roots." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social...y_of_Wisconsin
7. Fritz. Hans.
8. The architecture that still remains today. Here is an article about German churches: Milwaukee Architecture: The Cream City
9. The names of places or references - Germantown. Etc.
10. Here is a quick German-influenced history and how much remains in the Upper Midwest, as a summary (nearly half the people in Wisconsin report German ancestry, the highest in the country): Germans in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and the Upper Midwest

This is just a quick list. You keep mentioning this crap, and I keep having to tell you about where I grew up, because you never listen and have zero experience in this region despite what other people tell you. It's quite frustrating. Maybe this time you'll actually listen? Doubtful, but I gave it a shot.
 
Old 06-19-2015, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Nashville TN
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English by far and away I would say American culture is more like Canada than any other country in the world thou
 
Old 06-19-2015, 10:33 AM
 
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Maybe a few areas of Wisconsin and Minnesota happen to be more German-influenced, but there's no point arguing that German influence overpowers British influence for the whole nation overall.
 
Old 06-19-2015, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,304 posts, read 26,300,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
This is just a quick list. You keep mentioning this crap, and I keep having to tell you about where I grew up, because you never listen and have zero experience in this region despite what other people tell you. It's quite frustrating. Maybe this time you'll actually listen? Doubtful, but I gave it a shot.
I keep mentioning what crap? The last time I wrote something in a thread about German-Americans, it was about their ethnic consciousness (or lack thereof) compared to other European ethnic groups (Italians, Jews, Irish, etc.). The issue here is different. Nobody questions that Wisconsin has German cultural influences (as does Pennsylvania). My question is how anywhere in America has been more influenced by Germany than England when we've all essentially assimilated into a dominant, Anglo cultural paradigm.

The English language is merely the most obvious example (and I'm sure there are more English than German speakers in NE Wisconsin). There's also the English influence on our ideas about politics, education, etc. Sure, there are fundamental differences in the way Americans and Brits look at these things today, but our entire cultural underpinning can be directly traced to people from the British Isles during the 17th and 18th Centuries.

The one place that has a good argument for saying that this isn't the case would be much of Louisiana.
 
Old 06-19-2015, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I keep mentioning what crap? The last time I wrote something in a thread about German-Americans, it was about their ethnic consciousness (or lack thereof) compared to other European ethnic groups (Italians, Jews, Irish, etc.). The issue here is different. Nobody questions that Wisconsin has German cultural influences (as does Pennsylvania). My question is how anywhere in America has been more influenced by Germany than England when we've all essentially assimilated into a dominant, Anglo cultural paradigm.

The English language is merely the most obvious example (and I'm sure there are more English than German speakers in NE Wisconsin). There's also the English influence on our ideas about politics, education, etc. Sure, there are fundamental differences in the way Americans and Brits look at these things today, but our entire cultural underpinning can be directly traced to people from the British Isles during the 17th and 18th Centuries.

The one place that has a good argument for saying that this isn't the case would be much of Louisiana.
Nah, you responded to this post (with quote):

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
English for the large majority of the USA but because we have such a large population of German heritage, there are many areas which has a Germanic feel in the community.
With this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
What does that even mean? I can see people saying that certain parts of the Boston or New York metro areas have an "Irish" feel given IRA support and continued immigration from Ireland. I can't recall too many articles about a German-American lobby trying to get Congress to "legalize the Germans."


http://c1.thejournal.ie/media/2013/05/hillary-clinton-legalise-the-irish-t-shirt-390x285.jpg

Even with its large Irish population, I wouldn't say Boston feels anything like Dublin.
You've used the "boston/dublin" "arguement" several times already in different posts, by the way. Anyway, that's why I gave you a quick list of 10 things that "Germanic feel in the community" "means." Get it now?
 
Old 06-19-2015, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,304 posts, read 26,300,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
You've used the "boston/dublin" "arguement" several times already in different posts, by the way. Anyway, that's why I gave you a quick list of 10 things that "Germanic feel in the community" "means." Get it now?
I don't ever recall making the "boston/dublin" argument ever. And to me, there is a difference between saying that there are cultural influences (pizza, tacos, bagels, accents, etc.) and saying that a place has a Germanic/Italian/Jewish feel. New York City is chock full of people with European ethnic backgrounds, but I wouldn't say the city has a "European" feel.

The only reason I brought up Boston is because the immigrants there (some of whom are here illegally) are actually real Irish.

Last edited by BajanYankee; 06-19-2015 at 11:59 AM..
 
Old 06-19-2015, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,304 posts, read 26,300,037 times
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If there's anywhere in America that a "feel" of any country in Europe, I would say it's here.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK1bSdHgcTo

Even still, a lot of them have become Americanized (the entire framework for which dervives from English colonists).
 
Old 06-19-2015, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,406,945 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I don't ever recall making the "boston/dublin" argument ever. And to me, there is a difference between saying that there are cultural influences (pizza, tacos, bagels, accents, etc.) and saying that a place has a Germanic/Italian/Jewish feel. New York City is chock full of people with European ethnic backgrounds, but I wouldn't say the city has a "European" feel.

The only reason I brought up Boston is because the immigrants there (some of whom are here illegally) are actually real Irish.
You said the EXACT SAME THING in a similar discussion regarding German influence, and I gave you a similar explanation to no avail. Seems like you just argue your points to argue them, without considering other viewpoints, so you keep making the same circular arguments. I don't know why I can remember the specifics of what you posted (this isn't the first time I mentioned this tendency of yours) and you cannot, but it might have something to do with those regular $5,000 trips to Vegas "to find girls" and drink all night?
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