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Old 06-20-2015, 11:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
27% of Arizona is forested.

Here's an old thread you may be interested in: Forest Cover by Percent, US States
I wonder if that is including sparse woodland, though. It most likely is.
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Old 06-20-2015, 11:20 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,355,847 times
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I think that's impressive, and I think it has so very much to do with the fact that the rest of the country (the part that seems to have the most trees now, ironically) absolutely DESTROYED its native forests and we as a country decided to keep a lot of what remains in the Wild West. Thank God!!
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Old 06-20-2015, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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I thought Oregon would look to be more forested tbh.
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Old 06-21-2015, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
27% of Arizona is forested.

Here's an old thread you may be interested in: Forest Cover by Percent, US States
Yes Arizona most definitely got short changed on that map
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Old 06-21-2015, 09:04 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,171 posts, read 9,963,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Yes Arizona most definitely got short changed on that map
I think the OPs map shows areas of dense forest.

I was looking at satellite views of Arizona. There are areas of dense forest in Arizona to be sure. They look like pine forests to me. But there are also large areas of "light forest". By light forest, I mean trees that are separated from each by gaps of say 50, 100, 200 feet or more. You can see large areas of open ground, something you do not see as often in dense forests in say the Ozarks, the Upper Midwest or the Appalachians.
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Old 06-21-2015, 09:23 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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I suspect Piñon-Juniper woodlands are considered part of the total for Arizona's forest land whereas the aforementioned map may only reflect denser, canopied forest.
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Old 06-22-2015, 03:01 PM
 
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I'll take the West's varied landscape over everything else. Love it out here. You get a mix of many things.

Things don't have to green to be appreciated. Check out Monument Valley. One of the most beautiful places I have seen.
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Old 06-22-2015, 07:29 PM
 
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Depends on what you mean by forest and trees, AZ has forests of Palo Verdes and various desert trees. You should check out Tonto or the regions around the Santa Catalina's! Different kind of forest.

Then like NM it has large bands on Pine Forets (Piñon, Ponderosa, Aspen) then also forests of Elk, Oak and Douglas Firr
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Old 06-24-2015, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I thought Oregon would look to be more forested tbh.
Most of Oregon is east of the Cascades, so we experience a lot of rain-shadow effect immediately on the other side of the Cascades. Most, if not all, of Eastern Oregon is mostly arid desert with spotty forest coverage, except up towards Pendleton, Baker City, and La Grande, like the map shows. A friend of mine that lives in New Jersey thought the same thing when she saw pictures of Central Oregon. She had a vision in her head of expansive green forests covering the entire state, which isn't true. Probably contributes why so many people move to the PNW!

Unfortunately, we can't all have the dense, green forests that surround Portland and Eugene
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Old 06-25-2015, 10:32 AM
 
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Most of the region is what's called the Great Basin desert, so yes, it will lack tree cover.
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