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Old 07-21-2015, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,522 posts, read 7,468,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
It's mostly due to the UP - Wisconsin would be by far the most wooded state in the Midwest if you plucked the UP from MI, but throwing in a giant chunk of almost all-forested land tips the scales. Minnesota is a large state that's mostly prairie and plains. The northwoods, although a good-sized area, is only a small % of its total landmass, vs WI/MI at least.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States
At least half of lower Michigan is heavily forested as well, As far south as the Saginaw bay. The agricultural areas start south of that point. I do remember a lot of prairie in Minnesota, especially in the western half. Some of it looks a lot like the Dakotas.
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Old 07-21-2015, 07:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
It's mostly due to the UP - Wisconsin would be by far the most wooded state in the Midwest if you plucked the UP from MI, but throwing in a giant chunk of almost all-forested land tips the scales. Minnesota is a large state that's mostly prairie and plains. The northwoods, although a good-sized area, is only a small % of its total landmass, vs WI/MI at least.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States
Wisconsin is definitely more forested than the LP, about 90% of Michigan's population lives within 130 miles of the southern border. That leaves a good 160-200 miles of mostly forested area which is pretty substantial. If the perception is that the lower peninsula is mostly prarie it's just not the case.
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Old 07-21-2015, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,379 posts, read 1,196,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
It's mostly due to the UP - Wisconsin would be by far the most wooded state in the Midwest if you plucked the UP from MI, but throwing in a giant chunk of almost all-forested land tips the scales. Minnesota is a large state that's mostly prairie and plains. The northwoods, although a good-sized area, is only a small % of its total landmass, vs WI/MI at least.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States
Roughly 1/3rd of Minnesota is densely forested, another 1/3rd makes up a diagonal strip of land across the state which consists of broken woodland interspersed with farmland (what was once the Big Woods, marshland, and oak/aspen/birch savannah), and then the rest of the state (far western and southern) is tallgrass prairie.

If you look at the map in the link you provided, you'll see that about 2/3rds of the state has light to moderate tree cover. Except for extreme western and southwestern Minnesota, there really isn't any wide-open, treeless prairie like what you see in the Dakotas.

Just to give you an example of the kind of landscapes you see in the areas near the Twin Cities, here are some Google Street Views from the quasi-rural exurban area my parents live in the northern suburbs, which is a former farming area. In an effort not to cherry pick, I've found both grassy and wooded areas, very typical of the region:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ra...b4afcf!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.2644...8i1664!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.2803...8i1664!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.2873...8i1664!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.3115...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ra...b4afcf!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.2852...8i1664!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.2719...8i6656!6m1!1e1

In contrast, this is what extreme Western/Southwestern Minnesota looks like, which fits more of my definition of prairie:

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.2531...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@48.3159...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ra...b4afcf!6m1!1e1
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Old 07-22-2015, 09:46 AM
 
2,199 posts, read 2,321,739 times
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The future of the right-wing states is pretty bleak. In most of them, the present is pretty bleak, as well.
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Old 07-22-2015, 09:58 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,911,493 times
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It looks to me when looking at the satellite view of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, that the LP is more heavily forested then some people said. In fact, there are two large National Forests on the LP, Huron and Manistee.
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Old 07-22-2015, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
It looks to me when looking at the satellite view of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, that the LP is more heavily forested then some people said. In fact, there are two large National Forests on the LP, Huron and Manistee.
.

It's much less forested than Wisconsin - the UP bumps the average up. There are definitely forests there, though - very nice in the western and northern areas of the LP. It's not part of the Canadian Shield like areas MN/WI and the UP, but it has nice lakes and hills and woods, for sure Wisconsin's average also goes up considering it's not just the top 1/3 (northwoods) that are nearly all forest, but the Driftless, a farming area, is also half-forested due to all the steep bluffs and hills and valleys. 85% of the Driftless is in Wisconsin - MN has a small chunk. Add in the central WI forests (Waupaca through Black River State Forest), and it "makes up" for the vast tracks of farms in the rest of the state.

-----

And jennifat - links links links who cares? Michigan is over half forested, Wisconsin is nearly half forested, and Minnesota is just over a quarter forested, tied with Ohio and just under Delaware and Missouri: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States

I was pretty clear above that while Minnesota has a nice-sized northwoods, the majority of the large state is unforested, especially compared with Michigan and Wisconsin.
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Old 07-22-2015, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,379 posts, read 1,196,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
And jennifat - links links links who cares?
My point being is to illustrate with real images of environments that unforested doesn't necessarily mean "prairie". Basically all of central and east central (Twin Cities) Minnesota has scattered forest and woodlands that fall under that "unforested" portion of the state. It's somewhat misleading to discount that.
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Old 07-22-2015, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,399,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
My point being is to illustrate with real images of environments that unforested doesn't necessarily mean "prairie". Basically all of central and east central (Twin Cities) Minnesota has scattered forest and woodlands that fall under that "unforested" portion of the state. It's somewhat misleading to discount that.
Got it - not all the flat, mostly-treeless areas of Minnesota are technically prairie environs. I retract that motion.
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Old 07-22-2015, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,379 posts, read 1,196,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Got it - not all the flat, mostly-treeless areas of Minnesota are technically prairie environs. I retract that motion.
Those areas I described aren't mostly treeless. Obviously.
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Old 07-22-2015, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Raccoon City
814 posts, read 1,072,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
???

Here are the top food-producing states in the country: Total Agricultural Receipts Ranked by State from StuffAboutStates.com

Several of the top 9 border or are in the same exact region as Michigan:

1. California
2. Texas
3. Iowa
4. Nebraska
5. Minnesota
6. Illinois

7. Kansas
8. North Carolina
9. Wisconsin

Over half the top food-producing states in the country are in the "Michigan region." The Great Lakes region doesn't need Arizona's food (#29 on the list), but Arizona likely will need water, and quite possibly very soon, if the growth trend continues.
Kansas should be bolded as well, right? I mean if your talking about the Midwest. So that means 6 of the top 9 are in the Midwest. Not bad.
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