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Old 06-23-2015, 09:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
No seriously, someone from where the mountains are say 20,000 feet like Tibet, can look at 10,000 feet mountains in the western United States and say "that is flat"! New Mexico is flat! And you would realize how silly that it is.
The Tibetan Plateau is an average of 14,800 ft. The elevation span between regions in the Himalayas and mountains in the Western US isn't that different.
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Old 06-23-2015, 09:41 PM
 
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
MEAN elevation in the west is higher than in the east, many of the "taller" mountains out there are of comparable rise from base to summit to any mountain in the east.
This is true. Those 10,000 foot mountains directly east of SLC are about 4,000-5,000 feet base to peak. There are mountains in NH that are about 4,000 feet base to peak. Mt Evans in Colorado is only a couple thousand feet base to peak. In Yosemite, base to peak is only a couple thousand feet and I believe its largest mountain is 3,000-4,000 feet base to peak.
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Old 06-23-2015, 09:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
This is true. Those 10,000 foot mountains directly east of SLC are about 4,000-5,000 feet base to peak. There are mountains in NH that are about 4,000 feet base to peak. Mt Evans in Colorado is only a couple thousand feet base to peak. In Yosemite, base to peak is only a couple thousand feet and I believe its largest mountain is 3,000-4,000 feet base to peak.
Half Dome rises 4,800 ft out of the valley. There are only 10 mountains in all of New England which have a higher elevation than this, not rise. 9 of which are in New Hampshire, which only makes up 13% of the area of New England. It just isn't even close.
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Old 06-23-2015, 09:59 PM
 
Location: New England
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Originally Posted by Iaskwhy View Post
I really don't think you understand what an adjective is. 60 grit sand paper is rougher than 120 grit, it doesn't mean that 120 grit isn't rough, it means it is smoother than 60 grit though. You are being comically defensive over a trivial issue.
You said it wouldn't be unreasonable to call the NH mountains flat if you're coming from the west. I said they're not flat, because by definition, a mountain is not flat. And both 60 grit and 120 grit sandpaper are not smooth.
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Old 06-23-2015, 10:05 PM
 
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iaskwhy View Post
Half Dome rises 4,800 ft out of the valley. There are only 10 mountains in all of New England which have a higher elevation than this, not rise. It just isn't even close.
Half Dome is one mountain. Eagle Peak is 3,500. Yosemite Point is 2,800. North Dome is 3,200. There are multiple mountains in NH with comparable and higher rises.
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Old 06-23-2015, 10:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
You said it wouldn't be unreasonable to call the NH mountains flat if you're coming from the west. I said they're not flat, because by definition, a mountain is not flat. And both 60 grit and 120 grit sandpaper are not smooth.
Please go back to elementary school and learn how to use adjectives.
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Old 06-23-2015, 10:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
Half Dome is one mountain. Eagle Peak is 3,500. Yosemite Point is 2,800. North Dome is 3,200. There are multiple mountains in NH with comparable and higher rises.
You are comparing one National Park to an entire region of the US. Plus you are comparing nearly vertical granite walls to rounded mountains.

There are 128 ultra-prominant peaks in the US. 126 are in the West and 1 is in New England.
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Old 06-23-2015, 10:41 PM
 
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iaskwhy View Post
You are comparing one National Park to an entire region of the US. Plus you are comparing nearly vertical granite walls to rounded mountains.

There are 128 ultra-prominant peaks in the US. 126 are in the West and 1 is in New England.
I also compared mountains directly east of SLC and west of Denver, mountains nobody ever questions being mountains, to peaks in NH, which are questioned.

None of that is the point. I lived in Alaska and NH's mountains are not "flat" in any way whatsoever. They are less rugged and generally smaller, but they are not flat compared to anything.
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Old 06-23-2015, 11:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
I also compared mountains directly east of SLC and west of Denver, mountains nobody ever questions being mountains, to peaks in NH, which are questioned.

None of that is the point. I lived in Alaska and NH's mountains are not "flat" in any way whatsoever. They are less rugged and generally smaller, but they are not flat compared to anything.
First, this is a discussion of New England as a whole, not a couple of mountains in New Hampshire.

Second, I never said that New England was flat. I said compared to the West, New England is flat.

Third, I never questioned the mountain status of mountains in New England.


I am 6 feet tall. Compared to someone 5 feet tall, I am tall. Compared to someone 7 feet tall, I am short. Why is this concept so hard for you to understand. Adjectives are relatively meaningless when there isn't a reference point. I am old compared to the lifespan of a muon and I am young compared to the age of the universe. I am heavy compared to an ant and light compared to an elephant. Are you starting to understand this?

Compared to what I am accustomed to, I do not find New England particularly impressive in terms of natural beauty.
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Old 06-24-2015, 01:30 AM
 
Location: In the hot spot!
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New England Maps | Discover New England Whew! I nearly forgot the OP's original question! New England has lots of beautiful places to see and enjoy. Check out the link for more info.
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