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Old 06-24-2015, 02:24 PM
 
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Does this exist? Walkable, single family homes, architecturally different, shops, library, grocery within a mile or less. 10 miles or less from city core. Under 200k. Not the ghetto.

I enjoy driving, just not having to drive for everything. Like the idea of public transit, able to take the bus or train into the city for museums or whatever.

FYI: from Chicago originally, so I am spoiled regarding architecture, which I love! Love to drive around and check out old houses and neighborhoods.

Thanks!
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Old 06-24-2015, 02:33 PM
 
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Check out Lakewood OH, a border suburb on Cleveland's west side. It has two Cleveland MTA rail stations, a dense walkable core with plenty of shopping/services and nice architectural styles within attractive neighborhoods.
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Old 06-24-2015, 03:18 PM
 
Location: DC
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In terms of major US cities, it largely does not exist. You may be able to find a large town like Asheville, NC or Montpelier, VT, but not necessarily a major city. Most cities are not really very walkable. And in many major cities, price usually comes at the cost of safety.

You may be able to find something in one of the streetcar suburbs of Philly though. No garuntees though.
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Old 06-24-2015, 03:29 PM
 
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What do you consider to be major? Syracuse has had the most affordable major housing market in relation to family income according to NAHB the past 2 quarters. In the area, I'd say that villages such as Liverpool, Manlius and perhaps Fayetteville(hilly), Baldwinsville, North Syracuse, along with maybe a few others. There are city neighborhoods that could work, if that is what you wanted.

Syracuse named most affordable major housing market - LocalSYR.com powered by NewsChannel 9 WSYR Syracuse

Syracuse area named most affordable major housing market - LocalSYR.com powered by NewsChannel 9 WSYR Syracuse
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Old 06-24-2015, 03:33 PM
 
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I like the NKY towns across from Cincinnati. While Newport and Covington have the best transit connections, Bellevue might seem a bit safer. It's very pretty.
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Old 06-24-2015, 04:45 PM
 
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Thanks for the replies!

As I sat in my car in yet another almost torrential downpour here it Atlanta a few moments ago, I wondered is there anyplace that fits my criteria that doesn't have "take cover" type " severe weather center" weather???!! And all for under 200k lol
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Old 06-24-2015, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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They absolutely exist in Pittsburgh, although such neighborhoods are getting rarer.

Here's some charming, affordable houses which aren't in the ghetto. I find them charming anyway, and I'm real anal about interiors not being "updated" (I hate when gorgeous woodwork is painted). Your milage may vary. Walkability varies considerably however.

One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven

Edit. Two more just a bit over $200,000 here and here.

Last edited by eschaton; 06-24-2015 at 08:30 PM..
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Old 06-25-2015, 08:33 AM
 
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You are describing a typical summer weather pattern for most of the eastern half of the country. But in hydrology there is an intensity duration curve that demonstrates that very intense storm don't last very long. IMO that's not enough of a reason to avoid an area. In the south you just stay inside or pull over until it has passed. Maybe not a good idea in ATL traffic though.
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Old 06-25-2015, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Nashville, TN but walkable is probably 10ish+ years off for most neighborhoods. Even where I live in midtown/west end Nashville, there is lots of traffic and because the neighborhood is expensive, it tends to be entitled traffic which hurts walkability in my mind. I can walk to the grocery store but I usually have to get out of the way of a car gassing it as hard as they can as soon as they turn or as soon as they can go after they stop. It's walkable in the sense that I can get to a limited grocery store, the bank, and several food options, as well as the park but not so walkable in that traffic seems to disrupt the sense of connectedness that other walkable neighborhoods in other cities have. I guess what I'm getting at is that it seems like Nashville's urban environment is so concentrated but the rest of the city is so car-reliant, that this sort of stalemate exists.
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Old 06-25-2015, 10:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
You are describing a typical summer weather pattern for most of the eastern half of the country. But in hydrology there is an intensity duration curve that demonstrates that very intense storm don't last very long. IMO that's not enough of a reason to avoid an area. In the south you just stay inside or pull over until it has passed. Maybe not a good idea in ATL traffic though.
Thanks, you are right of course, it IS a typical SE weather pattern. Though I researched before we moved, I underestimated the effect that all of the "severe weather" warnings would have for me. True, they do not last long but there is something very unsettling about having to take cover and go into an inner wall safe area multiple times per year. One of those times, as I huddled with my son in our downstairs closet and my husband was out of town - I heard the proverbial freight train roar and when we went outside the ground was covered in hail and almost the entire subdivision needed new roofs.

And another time, my husband also happened to be out of town the storm was so bad parts of the fence were knocked out, large tree limbs were down, etc. I had never experienced these types of storms in the midwest or west though I know that rough weather can happen anywhere. I always liked the rain and don't want to have to be on high alert when it does rain.
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