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Old 02-20-2007, 07:27 AM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
304 posts, read 1,303,635 times
Reputation: 151

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Quote:
Originally Posted by youyou View Post
Although it's not very close to the Lakes, can anyone advise me about Pittsburgh? I've visited there several times and it seems very friendly, affordable, and not too big. Any thoughts?

I really appreciate all of your advice. Thanks again!
I hope it's not too late to chime in about Pittsburgh. My husband is from there and he loves the city. I've visited it before and was very impressed. It's definitely in one of my top two cities I would consider if I would move again (Kansas City is my other). Pittsburgh has a lot of great & distinct neighborhoods. There are some great colleges in the area. I'm not sure if this is important to you right now, but the metro area has several really good school systems as well. The crime rate is relatively low and housing is affordable. I think one of the complaints about Pittsburgh would be that the property taxes are on the high end, at least in Allegheny County. They don't seem so bad to me, but I have heard others complain. Check out the Pittsburgh board on here if you haven't already. I think that Pittsburgh had a downturn in its economy back in the 80s and a lot of people left the area, but the economy is gradually improving. Anyway, I think Pittsburgh is definitely worth some consideration.


On another note, Missouri might not be close to the Great Lakes, but the state does have plenty of beautiful lakes and rivers all over the place. The winters are definitely shorter than in some other areas you are considering (not sure if that would be a plus to you). I grew up in KC and as I mentioned it before, I would definitely go back again if I get a chance.

Good luck with your decision!
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Old 02-20-2007, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Utopia
1,999 posts, read 9,452,606 times
Reputation: 1482
Minneapolis area is supposedly one of the highest qualities of life in the entire nation.
Chicago has jobs always, but the cost of living ain't cheap. Keep that in mind. Lived there 3 years ago. Always something to do, great eats and architecture. But it's not only the high rent, but it is so costly on everything from parking to boarding your dog. It's the little misc. things that eat your money. But a great city where I always did well moneywise.
Ann Arbor is recommended on many sites as a wonderful place to live.
Pittsburgh is revitalizing, pretty but understand that the natives are distant and unfriendly. Not good if you are alone.
Check into Kansas City, Mo. I have been there and can vouch for it's livablity insofar as beauty. I was impressed. There are more fountains (the big horses, gods and all like you see in Rome and Florence) in KC than in any city in America. Do not know about the job situation there or the natives.
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Old 02-20-2007, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Metro Milwaukee, WI
3,198 posts, read 11,342,266 times
Reputation: 2168
Quote:
Originally Posted by youyou View Post
Milwaukee intrigues me
There hasn't been a huge surge of Milwaukee info thus far in this post...and I do not know if the original poster is still reading this thread anymore, but I think Milwaukee is a GREAT Midwestern city.

Personally - and this is just me - I would live in Milwaukee instead of Chicago in a heartbeat. (I lived in Milwaukee for 26 years). Milwaukee has similar weather to Chicago, but it smaller and much, much less congested. Quality of life in Milwaukee - in my opinion - is great in comparison to Chicago, because you have far less congestion and traffic, and it is far, far more affordable.

Milwaukee is big enough to have "big city" ammeneties like pro sports, college sports, theater, restaurants, etc. But if you need the "huge city" ammeneties like Chicago offers, Chicago is then only 70 miles away from Milwaukee.

Milwaukee is right on Lake Michigan - a very scenic location on the lake - and it has similar weather to Cleveland (slightly colder than Cleveland, which is bad, but generally less snow than Cleveland, which is good).

Colleges like Marquette and UW-Milwaukee abound.

Check Milwaukee out! I think with its beer-and-brats somewhat stodgy national reputation, it is one of the most underrated cities in the country.

I would return to living there in a heartbeat if we could add two months of spring in place of two months of winter there!
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Old 02-23-2007, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis
47 posts, read 280,811 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by youyou View Post
Hi,

I'm from Cleveland, have been living overseas for almost 2 years, and am preparing to return to the US. I like the Midwest (Great Lakes Region)and want to return. I'd appreciate advice/opinions on other Midwest cities, as I'm not limiting myself to just Cleveland.

Here's what I'm looking for:

Reasonable housing prices--I will rent, but prefer to rent a small free-standing house, rather than an appartment or duplex.

Some culture--at least a few universities in the area, good libraries, etc.

Diversity

Reasonable crime rate--something comparable to Cleveland.

Easy access to an airport

I'm thinking about Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, Pittsburgh.

If anyone is familiar with Cleveland, I'm looking for a community similar to Cleveland Heights or Lakewood--older, inner ring suburbs, affordable, middle class, diverse communities.

Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Well, I am not too familiar with any of the cities mentioned as far as costs of living but I feel that Indianapolis should be one of the Midwestern cities that you consider. Not only do we have affordable housing, we have a vast amount of cultural activities that cater to all races, a great amount of diversity although there are some areas who have more of one race than another but they are not totally made up of just one race, so there's your diversity there. As far as the crime rate, I have to be honest; it has been on the rise since last year but I've never came into contact with any type of problems with crime as far as being robbed or anything like that and I've lived here all my life. Also, anywhere you live in the city has easy access to the airport, which is located on the Westside of the city. Hope this helps and good luck!
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Old 02-23-2007, 07:49 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,033 posts, read 102,707,476 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiefs fan View Post
I hope it's not too late to chime in about Pittsburgh. My husband is from there and he loves the city. I've visited it before and was very impressed. It's definitely in one of my top two cities I would consider if I would move again (Kansas City is my other). Pittsburgh has a lot of great & distinct neighborhoods. There are some great colleges in the area. I'm not sure if this is important to you right now, but the metro area has several really good school systems as well. The crime rate is relatively low and housing is affordable. I think one of the complaints about Pittsburgh would be that the property taxes are on the high end, at least in Allegheny County. They don't seem so bad to me, but I have heard others complain. Check out the Pittsburgh board on here if you haven't already. I think that Pittsburgh had a downturn in its economy back in the 80s and a lot of people left the area, but the economy is gradually improving. Anyway, I think Pittsburgh is definitely worth some consideration.




Good luck with your decision!
If you actually have to work for a living, Pittsburgh is probably not the best choice. It would definitely be a good idea to have a job lined up before you moved there, unless you are a health care worker of some type. Chiefs fan is correct as far as she goes, but there's more. Pittsburgh didn't just have a downturn in its economy in the 80s, the steel industry collaspsed and with it the rest of the economy as well. The area has been losing population for decades. For 25 years, civic leaders there have said it will get better. It doesn't seem as bad as it was in the very early 80s, but it has a long way to go. Unless you are very young and independently weathy, AND able to wait a long time for things to improve, this is not the place for you. They brag about their schools, but I have never seen any data that they are actually better than most. Many of the school districts are small, with small high schools that obviously can't offer as many courses as a larger school. (I am not talking about the city schools, but some of the suburban ones and the schools in "exurbs".) Apparently taxes are quite high, about $5000/yr for every $50,000 of home value. So even the lower-priced houses have a heavy tax load. I grew up there and left in the 70s, but continue to visit as I have family there.
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Old 02-24-2007, 09:41 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,033 posts, read 102,707,476 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
If you actually have to work for a living, Pittsburgh is probably not the best choice. It would definitely be a good idea to have a job lined up before you moved there, unless you are a health care worker of some type. Chiefs fan is correct as far as she goes, but there's more. Pittsburgh didn't just have a downturn in its economy in the 80s, the steel industry collaspsed and with it the rest of the economy as well. The area has been losing population for decades. For 25 years, civic leaders there have said it will get better. It doesn't seem as bad as it was in the very early 80s, but it has a long way to go. Unless you are very young and independently weathy, AND able to wait a long time for things to improve, this is not the place for you. They brag about their schools, but I have never seen any data that they are actually better than most. Many of the school districts are small, with small high schools that obviously can't offer as many courses as a larger school. (I am not talking about the city schools, but some of the suburban ones and the schools in "exurbs".) Apparently taxes are quite high, about $5000/yr for every $50,000 of home value. So even the lower-priced houses have a heavy tax load. I grew up there and left in the 70s, but continue to visit as I have family there.
I quote myself. It's acutally more like $3000/$50000 of home value. Sorry for the error. I was way tired last night when I did the math.
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Old 03-02-2007, 05:04 AM
 
Location: Michissippi
3,116 posts, read 7,164,698 times
Reputation: 2055
I guess I should chime in here.

I lived in the Twin Cities (Minneapolis-St. Paul) for two years about 11 years ago and it's a great place. The metropolitain population is not too huge and it is very well spread out 360 degrees around the central city area (you won't feel crowded in like a sardine). The quality of life is good, violent crime is probably lower than in most cities, the ghettos are tame in comparison to what you might find in Detroit and Chicago, and the cost of living is relatively low for a city of its size. Also, if you're an outdoorsman, you'll probably love it. Also, there are outdoor activities in Minneapolis itself, which is home to a chain of lakes and a park and walking path that surrounds them.

You might also look into Columbus, Cincinatti, and Indianapolis. I don't know much about them but I've driven through Columbus a couple times and it looks like a nice place.

As for Milwaukee, doesn't Milwaukee have racial problems and a significant amount of urban poor? I ask because my impression of the town has always been that it was poor and decrepit and that the metro area didn't have much to offer, but perhaps I'm wrong.

Chicago is a wonderful city, but you'll need a high-paying job to really enjoy it. Personally, the metro area itself seems a little too crowded for me. However, I do adore Chicago's downtown; if it doesn't trump New York's downtown then it's second to it.

The Detroit area would otherwise be a nice place to live, but because the state's economy is collapsing, you should avoid it. People are not moving into Michigan; they are desperately trying to run away. (States like Wyoming come to Michigan and host job fairs.) The City of Detroit itself is the most pathetic city that I have ever seen for a city with a metropolitain area of its size. It has only a small handful of modern skyscrapers. However, the metropolitian area is quite nice and the cost of living is very low for a city of its size. In fact, Oakland Country (north and northwest of the city) is (or at least used to be) one of the wealthiest counties in the nation and it's still a nice place to live (if you have a good job). Ann Arbor, which is a college town and home to the University of Michigan, is a nice place to live, howerver, because it is in Michigan and because it is essentially a suburb of the Detroit area, the region's job woes will spill over to it.

I don't think there's much hope for Michigan's economy. I predict that GM and Ford are going to suffer more losses, especially when the price of gas increases, and Michigan's politicians are imbeciles. The governor believes that the solution to the state's economic woes is better education. (Why?--Educated people can easily leave the state.) Education is nice, but it isn't a substitute for sound economic policy and an attractive business climate.
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Old 03-27-2007, 05:23 AM
 
3 posts, read 12,971 times
Reputation: 10
Default Best midwest cities for tourists?

Hi everybody,

I'm a graduating student from NC and have never been to the midwest. I'm visiting a buddy in Chicago and am thinking of seeing another few places within the remaining 7-day window I have.

So far, it seems that Madison is a nice place to visit. Are the recommended cities posted previously ie. Columbus, Indianapolis, St. Paul, Ann Arbor, Cleveland still "valid" for a tourist like me? Besides Chicago, which 3 other midwest cities should not be missed?

I'll be in town for about 2 days' each and enjoy culture, architecture, alfreco dining, scenery of lakes/mountains. This is going to be a road trip.

Thanks!

Larry
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Old 03-27-2007, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,285,888 times
Reputation: 464
From Chicago, you should check out Madison, Ann Arbor, Cleveland, and Indianapolis. Make it a circle tour. Or, you could just drive around the lakes in Michigan and Wisconsin.
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Old 03-27-2007, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,455,711 times
Reputation: 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by lauta View Post
Hi everybody,

I'm a graduating student from NC and have never been to the midwest. I'm visiting a buddy in Chicago and am thinking of seeing another few places within the remaining 7-day window I have.

So far, it seems that Madison is a nice place to visit. Are the recommended cities posted previously ie. Columbus, Indianapolis, St. Paul, Ann Arbor, Cleveland still "valid" for a tourist like me? Besides Chicago, which 3 other midwest cities should not be missed?

I'll be in town for about 2 days' each and enjoy culture, architecture, alfreco dining, scenery of lakes/mountains. This is going to be a road trip.

Thanks!

Larry
When are you coming out? In summer Id recommend checking out the quaint villages of Door County, WI and Michigans UP. If in the UP, check out all the waterfalls and scenery. The Porcupine Mountains are beautiful as is Mackinac Island. For cities, Madison is quite nice, as is Minneapolis and areas of Milwaukee. Louisville has some charm as well as Cincinnati.
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