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Old 04-26-2007, 05:31 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,912,876 times
Reputation: 660

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I have to apologize I was not aware that the starter of this thread was looking for a place along the Great Lakes. But still, if you're looking for a community that is similar to Cleveland, St. Louis in my opinion is the most similar city in the Midwest to Cleveland at least as far as the size and businesses go. Clayton, Missouri, the county seat of St. Louis County is to me kind of similar to Akron as Cleveland's second downtown. Both cities are heavily dependent upon lakes/rivers for commerce, and both are relatively close in proximity to many many cities. Now I understand that there are some obvious differences between them. Cleveland is a Great Lakes city, and has vastly different weather from St. Louis. St. Louis' weather is fairly resemblant to cincinnati, Kansas City, Indianapolis and Columbus, so luckily we don't get bombed with ****loads of snow. the climate is continental. I kind of agree that it's a little strange to call Pittsburgh a Northeastern city..its not all that different from Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, and St. Louis. Erie is like a much smaller Cleveland. Chicago is pretty much like any Great Lakes city except it is much larger and I've always felt therefore vastly different from Cleveland and Detroit. I'd say the closest city in the Midwest to Chicago would have to Minneapolis and Saint Paul. If you want a city in the Upper Midwest like Cleveland and you don't want to look any further south than that I'd have to recommend maybe Milwaukee or Detroit. Columbus I've always felt has more in common with Cincinnati, although the political climate is certainly more liberal. Cincinnati pretty much is an anomaly in the midwest politically. They are conservative. St. Louis and Kansas City are much more liberal and more politically in tune with the Midwest. You actually won't get much of a political change in Missouri overall from that of Ohio...we're slightly more conservative, but we have a history of being a swing state like Ohio and the rural areas are more conservative versus the big cities which are liberal.
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Old 04-26-2007, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 9,002,567 times
Reputation: 2364
On my way home from Chicago, I had to pass through St. Louis. After driving through Illinois for 3-4 hours I was not expecting St. Louis to greet me with ugliness after seeing Chicago. That is still the biggest contrast I've ever seen in my life. I didn't know St. Louis is that ugly. I thought St. Louis would actually have some (at least 1) shiny skyscrapers but all I saw was an arch and old low buildings in the downtown behind it. It looked like it was abandoned and everyone moved to Chicago or out of the Midwest.
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Old 04-27-2007, 05:28 PM
 
26 posts, read 90,942 times
Reputation: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I am not from Pittsburgh, but I visited there for the first time 2 years ago. First of all, it's in PA, not in the midwest.

The city is beautiful. The steel mills are long gone. Downtown is vibrant, with lots of architectural charm, there are great ethnic neighborhoods all over town, there are beautiful old neighborhoods right in the city. Publci transportation seemed good, with a rail system connecting the southern burbs. There are several colleges and universities in town. Some publication (can't remember which) recomended it as the best big city for retirement (belive it or not) in the US, due to low cost of living, excellent transportation, relatively low crime rate and access to top notch health care services.

I was very impressed with "the burgh", as they called it!


I'm sure the mountains and river are very beautiful, I've just heard alot about it being gritty dirty and rude (But I'm not one to judge so I'll visit it before confirming those statements). I am also originally from PA (sad to say I've never been to Pittsburgh) and I love PA's countryside (I also love cities of course) and i've never been past Harrisburg, when it's not absolutely barren, the PA countryside is so pretty, pleasent and frendly.

LOL, people from philly would get so pissed when Pittsburghers pretend to be east coasters The Allegheny river is the continental divide due to waterflow (away from the atlantic) so Yes it is actually in the midwest if you want to get scientific (or appalaichan) I absolutely refuse to put most parts of PA into 'the Northeast' aside from the eastern part of the state. so much of it is culturally nothing like the rest of the northeast. PA is a northeast wannabe state lol.. nobody says 'Yinz' or 'pop' in the northeast.
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Old 04-28-2007, 11:22 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,020 posts, read 102,689,903 times
Reputation: 33083
Unless you are interested in a college town tour, I'd pick one or two and then bag the rest. Bloomington, Ind, is a college town; so are Bloomington and Champaign, IL in central Illinois. Believe me, Champaign is nothing to waste your time on unless you have friends there to visit. Des Moines? I dunno. I've never been very impressed.
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Old 04-28-2007, 10:04 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,912,876 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
On my way home from Chicago, I had to pass through St. Louis. After driving through Illinois for 3-4 hours I was not expecting St. Louis to greet me with ugliness after seeing Chicago. That is still the biggest contrast I've ever seen in my life. I didn't know St. Louis is that ugly. I thought St. Louis would actually have some (at least 1) shiny skyscrapers but all I saw was an arch and old low buildings in the downtown behind it. It looked like it was abandoned and everyone moved to Chicago or out of the Midwest.
Yea well we don't have skyscrapers like Chicago's because there is a rule that no downtown building can surpass the Arch in height. We have three that are almost as tall or nearly as tall and they look shorter because they are several miles behind it. LMAO you're there is no downtown? We are as big as downtown Cleveland minimum. And there is more to ST. Louis than just the downtown area. I never compared it to Chicago ok? You have to look beyond just Downtown St. Louis to get a real idea of what the city is like. And how is it ugly? *********. How dare you put down the great St. Louis! East Saint Louis is not St. Louis!!! OK!!! WE DON'T ASSOCIATE WITH ANYTHING IN ILLINOIS!!! Also, our skyline extends beyond downtown...it extends all the way to Clayton. You could technically argue that the St. Louis Skyline continues 8 miles west from the Mississippi to Clayton. Drive west on I-64 from the Poplar Street Bridge and you will know what I'm talking about. You honestly expect every city to be just like Chicago or measure up to it?

Last edited by ajf131; 04-28-2007 at 10:16 PM..
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Old 04-29-2007, 01:47 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,912,876 times
Reputation: 660
I agree with Central Illinois. As a resident of St. Louis, Springfield is practically a suburb of our's so I visit there quite often. It's a growing community and is close to Chicago, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Des Moines, Indianapolis, etc. Central Illinois is a great place to live and it is growing like hell.
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Old 04-29-2007, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,449,604 times
Reputation: 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Yea well we don't have skyscrapers like Chicago's because there is a rule that no downtown building can surpass the Arch in height. We have three that are almost as tall or nearly as tall and they look shorter because they are several miles behind it. LMAO you're there is no downtown? We are as big as downtown Cleveland minimum. And there is more to ST. Louis than just the downtown area. I never compared it to Chicago ok? You have to look beyond just Downtown St. Louis to get a real idea of what the city is like. And how is it ugly? *********. How dare you put down the great St. Louis! East Saint Louis is not St. Louis!!! OK!!! WE DON'T ASSOCIATE WITH ANYTHING IN ILLINOIS!!! Also, our skyline extends beyond downtown...it extends all the way to Clayton. You could technically argue that the St. Louis Skyline continues 8 miles west from the Mississippi to Clayton. Drive west on I-64 from the Poplar Street Bridge and you will know what I'm talking about. You honestly expect every city to be just like Chicago or measure up to it?
Woah, ease up there Nelly. We all have our opinions, Im sure she didnt mean any harm. Even though St. Louis is doing a little more with its downtown, its the surrounding areas that are very blighted and ugly.
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Old 04-29-2007, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Deep In The Heat Of Texas
2,639 posts, read 2,464,052 times
Reputation: 700
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
On my way home from Chicago, I had to pass through St. Louis. After driving through Illinois for 3-4 hours I was not expecting St. Louis to greet me with ugliness after seeing Chicago. That is still the biggest contrast I've ever seen in my life. I didn't know St. Louis is that ugly. I thought St. Louis would actually have some (at least 1) shiny skyscrapers but all I saw was an arch and old low buildings in the downtown behind it. It looked like it was abandoned and everyone moved to Chicago or out of the Midwest.

Another bad note for St. Louis is that in 2006, it was rated the city with the highest violent crime and highest property crime rates in the nation. I wouldn't have thought that of St. Louis.
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Old 04-29-2007, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Lakewood, CO
353 posts, read 378,941 times
Reputation: 50
Does Denver count as a midwestern city? If so you might like it. It's not terribly diverse or cultured--but it's a helluva town.
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Old 04-29-2007, 02:20 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,912,876 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by KewGee View Post

Another bad note for St. Louis is that in 2006, it was rated the city with the highest violent crime and highest property crime rates in the nation. I wouldn't have thought that of St. Louis.
Hold on buddy. This is just for St. Louis city. The whole metro area itself makes Detroit look extremely dangerous. St. Louis city itself is very small. The whole metro area makes that crime thingy look small. The suburbs are really quite safe.
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