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Old 10-01-2015, 04:41 PM
 
56,660 posts, read 80,973,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
Buffalo NY and Memphis TN come to mind. Tulsa seems to be growing very slowly (urban core).
I don't think Buffalo fits, given that the state invested a billion dollars into the city/area.
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Old 10-01-2015, 10:10 PM
 
414 posts, read 1,589,568 times
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The bubble will burst.
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Old 10-02-2015, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,321,280 times
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Great question by the OP, and based on the answers I've seen so far, it sounds like the answer is "no". However, "major revitalization" is a relative term, so cities like Cleveland or Detroit that are experiencing a "renaissance" right now are growing MUCH more slowly than the "it" cities on the coasts and in the Sun Belt, but relative to where these cities were for the past 40 years, the growth is probably MORE robust than almost any of the aforementioned cities.

So, in short, it seems like there are no major cities that are not experiencing a major revitalization, when relativity is factored in.
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Old 10-02-2015, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,321,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ComfortablyNumb View Post
The bubble will burst.
for whom? Or did you mean in general (for everyone)? Are you worried about another recession (I know I am)?
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Old 10-02-2015, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,937,287 times
Reputation: 10542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Great question by the OP, and based on the answers I've seen so far, it sounds like the answer is "no". However, "major revitalization" is a relative term, so cities like Cleveland or Detroit that are experiencing a "renaissance" right now are growing MUCH more slowly than the "it" cities on the coasts and in the Sun Belt, but relative to where these cities were for the past 40 years, the growth is probably MORE robust than almost any of the aforementioned cities.

So, in short, it seems like there are no major cities that are not experiencing a major revitalization, when relativity is factored in.
I'd argue that cities like Detroit and Cleveland, although experiencing a revitalization, are not experiencing a major one, insofar as redevelopment of Downtown to include more residential elements and gentrification of the inner ring of neighborhoods is not yet enough to offset the decline in population in outer neighborhoods.

Of course, population growth/decline isn't the be all end all of revitalization. Individual neighborhoods can grow in desirability while declining in population if low-income families are displaced by single high earners. In theory the same process can happen on a city-wide basis, but it seldom does because cities as a whole tend to have old under-utilized industrial properties where overall population density can increase. More notably, cities can see a population increase without any gentrification to speak of if they are in an area which captures a lot of immigrants, there is a high birth rate, or if they are still annexing suburban land. Hartford and Stockton, for example, are both growing cities, but no one would say they have more than a whiff of gentrification.
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Old 10-02-2015, 04:02 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,969,169 times
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Las Vegas and Hartford are the only major metropolitan areas with downtowns that are poorer now than 20 years ago.
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Old 04-17-2019, 12:37 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,553 posts, read 717,117 times
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I didn't perceive any kind of revitalization in San Antonio or Albuquerque when I was there a couple years back. They weren't dying by any means, but it seemed like the growth was happening at the fringes.
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Old 04-17-2019, 01:16 AM
Status: "You picked the wrong fool, fool." (set 12 days ago)
 
537 posts, read 142,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTheWayToMemphis View Post
Which major cities are not experiencing a major revitalization right now? Let's define major as >~1 million MSA (can give or take a bit).

All over the nation the younger millennial generation is moving back into urban areas and making them vibrant and fashionable again -- even areas like Detroit and Pittsburgh that people thought would never come back.

What major cities are not seeing this major change? I don't necessarily mean just the cities that are continuing to decline (although they would apply too, but also those that are just not seeing a ton of growth and an influx of young white professionals and families.
Pittsburgh and Detroit have young, urban loving millennials moving into them, but I wouldn't say they're experiencing major revitalization. That may actually be an acceptable term relative to the decades-long stagnation they've experienced but both cities aren't even growing in population yet. Philly's experiencing more growth I think but I wouldn't even call that anything major.
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Old 04-17-2019, 01:37 AM
 
205 posts, read 161,371 times
Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Great question by the OP, and based on the answers I've seen so far, it sounds like the answer is "no". However, "major revitalization" is a relative term, so cities like Cleveland or Detroit that are experiencing a "renaissance" right now are growing MUCH more slowly than the "it" cities on the coasts and in the Sun Belt, but relative to where these cities were for the past 40 years, the growth is probably MORE robust than almost any of the aforementioned cities.

So, in short, it seems like there are no major cities that are not experiencing a major revitalization, when relativity is factored in.
I see this is a four-year-old thread that got kicked back up, but this still remains the best answer. Every major city is seeing revitalization, some are doing it in a different way.

For Cleveland (and Detroit), it may not be 4-5 crains in the sky (though I believe both cities do have at least one ... know Cleveland had two a couple months ago) because those cities already had an inventory of massive old buildings that went empty and are now are being redeveloped, or have already been redeveloped.

Take 925 Euclid in Cleveland, for example. It's one of the most immaculate buildings in the USA (at the time it was originally built, it was either the largest, or at least top 5 largest, buildings in the world at something like 1.2 million square feet ... "only" 20 stories but on a massive footprint). That's essentially the same square footage of the 947-foot Key Tower (also in Cleveland). You won't see a tower crain 900 feet in the air, so there isn't much visual evidence of what is being done there.

https://www.loopnet.com/Listing/925-...d-OH/14405329/

And Cleveland, like Detroit, has had dozens of other older buildings that have also been redeveloped that hasn't added anything new to the skyline, but has done just as much as new construction in terms of vibrancy.

Plus, in terms of new construction, Cleveland has pretty much had at least one tower crane at all times for a 300-plus foot building at all times since 2010 when the Ernst and Young building started; then the 320-foot downtown Hilton; then the 355-foot Beacon apartment tower which is being wrapped up; then the 400-foot Lumen apartment tower which is underway; then hopefully NuCLEus will finally break ground, and being that it has been scaled back from a 650 foot tower and a smaller second tower to two 30-story towers, probably has a real chance of breaking ground soon; then by the time that wraps up a very good chance that Sherwin-Williams will be breaking ground on a new 500-foot-plus new corporate headquarters.

So, until Sherwin-Williams moves forward on a new headquarters, probably won't see anything skyline altering, but that doesn't mean that there hasn't been a massive amount of construction going on.
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Old 04-17-2019, 05:26 AM
 
9,384 posts, read 9,548,809 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandBrown View Post
I see this is a four-year-old thread that got kicked back up, but this still remains the best answer. Every major city is seeing revitalization, some are doing it in a different way.

For Cleveland (and Detroit), it may not be 4-5 crains in the sky (though I believe both cities do have at least one ... know Cleveland had two a couple months ago) because those cities already had an inventory of massive old buildings that went empty and are now are being redeveloped, or have already been redeveloped.

Take 925 Euclid in Cleveland, for example. It's one of the most immaculate buildings in the USA (at the time it was originally built, it was either the largest, or at least top 5 largest, buildings in the world at something like 1.2 million square feet ... "only" 20 stories but on a massive footprint). That's essentially the same square footage of the 947-foot Key Tower (also in Cleveland). You won't see a tower crain 900 feet in the air, so there isn't much visual evidence of what is being done there.

https://www.loopnet.com/Listing/925-...d-OH/14405329/

And Cleveland, like Detroit, has had dozens of other older buildings that have also been redeveloped that hasn't added anything new to the skyline, but has done just as much as new construction in terms of vibrancy.

Plus, in terms of new construction, Cleveland has pretty much had at least one tower crane at all times for a 300-plus foot building at all times since 2010 when the Ernst and Young building started; then the 320-foot downtown Hilton; then the 355-foot Beacon apartment tower which is being wrapped up; then the 400-foot Lumen apartment tower which is underway; then hopefully NuCLEus will finally break ground, and being that it has been scaled back from a 650 foot tower and a smaller second tower to two 30-story towers, probably has a real chance of breaking ground soon; then by the time that wraps up a very good chance that Sherwin-Williams will be breaking ground on a new 500-foot-plus new corporate headquarters.

So, until Sherwin-Williams moves forward on a new headquarters, probably won't see anything skyline altering, but that doesn't mean that there hasn't been a massive amount of construction going on.
You’re kind of proving his point. “A Building here, Renovation there” is relatively major for Cleveland. There are cities like Charlotte or Austin where you notice what was there 15 years ago, not what has changed in 15 years.
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