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Old 10-06-2015, 09:49 AM
 
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They are pretty common in PA.

Philly area has Newtown Heights, Haddon Heights, Chester Heights, Clifton Heights etc.

Pittsburgh area has Brighton Heights, Crafton Heights, Northview Heights, Stanton Heights, Natrona Heights, etc
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,933,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
Pittsburgh area has Brighton Heights, Crafton Heights, Northview Heights, Stanton Heights, Natrona Heights, etc
Also Arlington Heights, Duqnese Heights, Kirwan Heights, Ben Avon Heights, Sewickley Heights, and Hickory Heights. That makes at least 11.

We're also a fan of hills (16: East Hills, Middle Hill, Observatory Hill, Perry Hilltop, Spring Hill, Squirrel Hill, Summer Hill, Troy Hill, Upper Hill, Braddock Hills, Churchill, Forest Hills, Jefferson Hills, Pleasant Hills, Sewickley Hills, Penn Hills, Cubbage Hill) and Mountains (7: Mount Oliver, Mount Washington, Ridgemont, Mount Vernon, Dormont, Oakmont)
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Old 10-06-2015, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
1,385 posts, read 1,692,527 times
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"Heights" is supposed to be a descriptive term for land that is higher than other land near it. But, over the years I think people have just taken and accepted it to be a generic name add-on for neighborhoods, subdivisions and suburbs or towns which may not actually fit the descriptive term.

In Albuquerque the single largest geographic and population area of our city is the Northeast Heights. It got its name because it was on land higher than downtown and the rest of the older parts of the city down in the valley of the Rio Grande.

Because Albuquerque uses the quadrant system like Washington, DC, there is also the separate Southeast Heights, which is the next-largest single area with the term "heights" as part of its name in the city.

Both the Northeast and Southeast Heights sit on what was known as the East Mesa before the 1950s suburban expansion of Albuquerque when it was mostly barren land and not part of the city. Both areas together are referred to simply as "The Heights" by people in Albuquerque.

Additionally, since the Northeast Heights is so big it has been further broken down into the Near Heights, Mid-Heights and Far Northeast Heights areas.

Albuquerque has a West Mesa which, like the former East Mesa, also sits on land higher than the immediate Rio Grande valley floor. Most of this area is known as the Westside and its has these city neighborhoods with "heights" as part of their name: Grande Heights, Quaker Heights, Volcano Heights, Congress Heights, Paradise Heights, and Cottonwood Heights.

Outside of the city in this same area is Corrales Heights in Corrales, a semi-rural suburb of Albuquerque.

On the Southwest Mesa of Albuquerque there is also the area called Anderson Heights.

Back on the former East Mesa these are the neighborhoods with "heights" in their name: Sandia Heights, Academy Heights, Panorama Heights, Crestview Heights, Skyline Heights, Royal Heights, and Snow Heights.

Also on the east side of town, there is the Los Altos area around Los Altos Golf Course. "Los Altos" is the Spanish translation of "the heights"

There is also a separate, older Los Altos neighborhood in the Alamosa area on Albuquerque's West Mesa.

We also have the Las Alturas subdivision of the Altura area in the Near Heights part of town. "Las Alturas" can also be translated as "the heights" in Spanish.

Last edited by ABQalex; 10-06-2015 at 10:27 AM..
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Old 10-06-2015, 07:11 PM
 
Location: sumter
8,571 posts, read 5,386,531 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQalex View Post
"Heights" is supposed to be a descriptive term for land that is higher than other land near it. But, over the years I think people have just taken and accepted it to be a generic name add-on for neighborhoods, subdivisions and suburbs or towns which may not actually fit the descriptive term.

In Albuquerque the single largest geographic and population area of our city is the Northeast Heights. It got its name because it was on land higher than downtown and the rest of the older parts of the city down in the valley of the Rio Grande.

Because Albuquerque uses the quadrant system like Washington, DC, there is also the separate Southeast Heights, which is the next-largest single area with the term "heights" as part of its name in the city.

Both the Northeast and Southeast Heights sit on what was known as the East Mesa before the 1950s suburban expansion of Albuquerque when it was mostly barren land and not part of the city. Both areas together are referred to simply as "The Heights" by people in Albuquerque.

Additionally, since the Northeast Heights is so big it has been further broken down into the Near Heights, Mid-Heights and Far Northeast Heights areas.

Albuquerque has a West Mesa which, like the former East Mesa, also sits on land higher than the immediate Rio Grande valley floor. Most of this area is known as the Westside and its has these city neighborhoods with "heights" as part of their name: Grande Heights, Quaker Heights, Volcano Heights, Congress Heights, Paradise Heights, and Cottonwood Heights.

Outside of the city in this same area is Corrales Heights in Corrales, a semi-rural suburb of Albuquerque.

On the Southwest Mesa of Albuquerque there is also the area called Anderson Heights.

Back on the former East Mesa these are the neighborhoods with "heights" in their name: Sandia Heights, Academy Heights, Panorama Heights, Crestview Heights, Skyline Heights, Royal Heights, and Snow Heights.

Also on the east side of town, there is the Los Altos area around Los Altos Golf Course. "Los Altos" is the Spanish translation of "the heights"

There is also a separate, older Los Altos neighborhood in the Alamosa area on Albuquerque's West Mesa.

We also have the Las Alturas subdivision of the Altura area in the Near Heights part of town. "Las Alturas" can also be translated as "the heights" in Spanish.
Nice information here, thanks.
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Old 10-06-2015, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,036,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
There aren't any "Heights" in Milwaukee or Madison that I know of. The highest concentration I've seen are in Cleveland, though I know there are a good number in Chicago and Detroit, and now I know that there are a ton in the DC area.
Dearborn Heights, Sterling Heights, and Madison Heights is pretty much it near Detroit.

'Heights' was added to Dearborn Township and Sterling Township to keep from two municipalities in the state from having the same name when incorporated. There's already the City of Dearborn and the Village of Sterling.

Madison Heights is more or less named after the school district (Madison School District) which itself is named after President James Madison. It was originally apart of Royal Oak Township.
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Old 10-07-2015, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
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For Houston, Houston Heights is actually a high point in Houston.
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Old 10-08-2015, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,179 posts, read 3,850,465 times
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I think part of the reason for so many "Heights" in Cleveland is because of the unique geography of the East Side, due the the Lake Erie Escarpment, in which much of the city sits "down the hill" and the suburbs sit "up the hill". Cleveland Heights is literally higher than Cleveland. The cities that aren't sitting atop the lake escarpment, like Newburgh Heights, Cuyahoga Heights, Parma Heights, etc. were probably just jumping on the Heights bandwagon for branding purposes, because the other heights were nice areas, and the word Heights makes them sound high-end, and high quality.

Cleveland suburbs that end in Heights:

-Bedford Heights
-Broadview Heights
-Brooklyn Heights
-Cleveland Heights
-Cuyahoga Heights
-Garfield Heights
-Highland Heights
-Maple Heights
-Mayfield Heights
-Middleburg Heights
-Newburg Heights
-Parma Heights
-Richmond Heights
-Shaker Heights
-University Heights
-Warrensville Heights
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Old 10-08-2015, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
375 posts, read 346,167 times
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Liberty Heights anyone?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HHBBSRr2KY
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Old 10-08-2015, 01:43 PM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,721,195 times
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In upstate NY the city of Elmira (a much sadder place now than when one Samuel Clemens aka Mark Twain married into old money there) is surrounded by high hills, with one broad valley to the north. Guess where the inner ring suburban Village of Elmira Heights is? In the valley, naturally.
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Old 10-08-2015, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,489 posts, read 16,164,190 times
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I can only think of a few in NJ:
Hasbrouck Heights
Berkeley Heights
Jersey City Heights
Seaside Heights

There could be plenty more I can't think of or don't know about.
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