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Old 05-17-2016, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Illinois
992 posts, read 596,228 times
Reputation: 1099

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Lived my first 32 years in the Chicago suburbs (except for college), and moved to Tucson, AZ.

It's a big shock, even though I vacationed and spent lots of time in Tucson prior to moving there. When the best parking spot is a tiny bit of shade instead of close to the door. When a cloudy day goes from depressing to so relieving on the eyes.

We ended up moving back after 2 years. Tucson has some positives, but it's really much better as a vacation/retirement place.
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Old 05-17-2016, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Big Bayou
721 posts, read 300,238 times
Reputation: 988
I find that living near the beach here in Florida is pretty similar to what living near the beach in California or Hawaii was like. So, state by state there isn't much difference, but geography can still make a big difference in your lifestyle. For example, someone who lives up on a mountain in California might have a very different California experience than I had near the beach, but the mountain life in California is probably not too different than what mountain life in Vermont is like. Living in the desert in Arizona is probably very different from ski-town life in Vermont, but it is probably not too different from desert life in western Texas. That is my take on it.
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Old 05-17-2016, 05:31 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,073,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I grew up in Tennessee and have lived for at least a month to two years in Iowa, Massachusetts, Indiana, rural Virginia, and South Carolina.

South Carolina and Virginia were obviously the most similar - no culture shock there. Boston was different, but I liked it, aside from the winter weather and traffic congestion. Virtually everyone I met on the street was talkative and friendly - it was a big, bustling city with a lot more than anywhere I'd ever been, aside from Atlanta. Beautiful scenery outside the metro, close to mountains, hiking, bodies of water, etc. The geography and outdoor opportunities were just as much as in Tennessee, but for a smaller portion of the year.

Iowa completely sucks. Flat, cold in the winter, hellacious storms, isolated, nothing in terms of scenery, lack of things to do, and the weirdest culture I've seen anywhere. People weren't polite or friendly, folks thought I was stupid due to my accent, people seemed "backward," and there was this weird civic culture I'd never seen anywhere. It's common to see bumper stickers with cut-outs of the state and "IA native" scribbled in. If you're not involved in civic organizations in Des Moines, you're like a cast out. I got out of that place in a year. If I never see Iowa again, I don't care.

Indiana is better than Iowa - people are generally a bit more polite and well-rounded, but they're certainly not as friendly as the South or Boston. Mostly flat, featureless, cold, and boring. I've been here for two years and I'm still not really liking it. I tolerate it, but that's it.
I hope people don't listen to you. Iowa is not flat, backward, or weird. It's "weird" to you that people are involved in their city's culture…..I'd say just the opposite.
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Old 05-17-2016, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,592 posts, read 17,582,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NowInWI View Post
I hope people don't listen to you. Iowa is not flat, backward, or weird. It's "weird" to you that people are involved in their city's culture…..I'd say just the opposite.
Iowa is mostly flat, as are most Midwestern states. This goes beyond "civic pride" to an almost cult-like devotion to Des Moines, like it's a Chicago alternative. Des Moines is nice for a metro that was ~500k at the time with a good economy, but it is not some mecca for transplants. Hell, I'd say they run a lot of them off.
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Old 05-18-2016, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,403,806 times
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Raised in NJ moved to OH. Pretty different.
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Old 05-18-2016, 01:02 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,073,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Iowa is mostly flat, as are most Midwestern states. This goes beyond "civic pride" to an almost cult-like devotion to Des Moines, like it's a Chicago alternative. Des Moines is nice for a metro that was ~500k at the time with a good economy, but it is not some mecca for transplants. Hell, I'd say they run a lot of them off.
All of the Midwest is not flat - especially Wisconsin. However, your Indiana's flatness beats Iowa's flatness by one. Congrats!!

http://www.theatlantic.com/technolog...ancake/284348/
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Old 05-18-2016, 01:14 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,448,498 times
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I grew up in eastern Nebraska and moved to western South Dakota. The two are fairly similar, but there are differences that I notice. The culture here is western and ranching. The climate is drier with different disasters to worry about. It's more laid back in general here (not that Omaha is uppity or anything). The biggest difference for me is the hills and living in a tourist area. I like it.
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Old 05-18-2016, 04:14 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,966,293 times
Reputation: 14673
I moved from Pennsylvania to Georgia when I was 16. It was enough of a culture shock that I was miserable for my first few years in Georgia. It's grown on me, though. Depending on where you're from originally, sometimes you just need time to get used to the culture where you move to.
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