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Old 10-07-2015, 05:52 PM
 
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In the age of globalism, and big federal government, can moving to a different US state than the one your at still be a totally different experience than what your used to?
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Old 10-07-2015, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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I lived in Virginia my entire life and then moved to South Dakota last year for a little bit.

It was pretty different, but it was still America.
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Old 10-07-2015, 06:36 PM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
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No matter what some may say, the US is still the US and you will find similarities wherever you may go. I think most of the differences you'll find are not one state to another but between urban and rural, mountains and sea coast, two seasons and four seasons, desert and wetlands, rocky's and appalachians, Alaska and Florida.

I grew up in MD by DC and now live on MD's coast. I have also lived in South Florida, practically lived in Hatteras, NC and Central NJ, and been weathered in for weeks at a time in most stops along the Atlantic coast. From what I noticed, there really wasn't much difference in any of those places. Only Hatteras seemed a tad different but that was more to do with it's isolation then anything else.
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Old 10-07-2015, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles,CA & Scottsdale, AZ
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I lived in Northern Virginia and Arizona while growing up, now I live in California.

Phoenix and Los Angeles area are pretty much similar in terms of culture and structure/people. Feels the same more or less.

Northern Virginia and Phoenix had a lot of similarities also, pretty similar mindset and feeling minus the trees lol. So yeah most of the US is still the US no matter where you live and you will still get that American feel.
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Old 10-07-2015, 07:44 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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I won't lie. New York City to Albuquerque was an eye-opener.

People went on about how unique the culture is with the Spanish colonial descendants and Native Americans. And there is that. But coming from NYC, it struck me as the middle America, hot dogs and apple pie type of place I had only seen in movies.
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Old 10-07-2015, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Earth
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I grew up in Mass, but I've also lived in CT, VT, NY and HI.

I know I'm just generalizing but Hawaii was probably the most different for me for some obvious and some not so obvious reasons. Of course I also found other differences as well.

Growing up in Massachusetts, I found my fellow baystaters to be very hard working, early risers and a bit uptight. In Hawaii, certainly the weather plays a role on everyone's mentality so things move a bit slower and people are far more relaxed about things. I also found that despite the fact that I tend to be a "liberal" in my politics, I found far more "reactionary liberals" in Vermont and Hawaii. What I mean by that was it seemed that many progressive thinkers I encountered in those states seemed to be less thoughtful and more willing to protest or blame America for everything. Of course it could have been the fact that I lived in some colleges in both states. Whereas I have always found the liberal political thought in Massachusetts to be more tempered and thoughtful.

When I lived in NYC, I was often amazed at how many New Yorkers had traveled so little. The prevailing attitude that "New York has so many immigrants, why would I need to travel" nonsense really frustrated me. I was also amazed at how many people had lived in the City their whole lives but had never visited Staten Island or other parts of the city.

Of course New Yorkers tend to be a lot more open and friendly (on a superficial level it seemed) than back in Mass. For example, my friend from hometown (very white town) came to visit me in the very diverse neighborhood I was living in Queens, he was amazed at how friendly and happy people were at the night club we were at. He remarked that in the clubs in the Boston Metro, people don't smile too much and they tend to look around because everyone's a powder keg looking to fight.

Last edited by bolehboleh; 10-07-2015 at 08:54 PM..
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Old 10-07-2015, 08:27 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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I also grew up in Massachusetts. Though I will agree with some bolehboleh's sentiments, I do think people in Mass are more friendly than given credit for. They are definitely tough nuts to crack. I have spent a lot of time on the North Shore and Cape Cod, I consider people on the Cape to be friendlier, laid back, and more open to chat. But yes there will definitely be encounters to the ornery side of people in the state as well. I wouldn't say its fair to characterize Bostonians as powder kegs, that wasn't my experience. I guess it just depends on what circles one hangs around in. Some of the most caring, genuine, and compassionate people I know are in Massachusetts.

I lived in Seattle for five years. That is another place that has a visible and palpable presence of reactionary liberals and they are definitely more environmentally conscious there. But I also appreciated their intellect. Some of the funniest people I've met live there. I made life long friends in Seattle. The Seattle freeze is around, but it can go both ways. Like anywhere, you get what you give.

New Mexico is definitely a very different experience, a lot more so than Seattle was from Boston. Things move slower here, the sunny weather and desert scapes do have an effect on me, mostly a positive one. This would be a hard climate to give up. I generally think people are a tad friendlier and more approachable here, and its very live and let live. There is no high echelon standard in New Mexico. There are definitely nice places to live and wealthy pockets, but the level of poverty and crime is very eye opening, especially on the reservations. The rat race and hustle of the Boston area was pretty draining at times. The pace of life here is a good remedy for those who want to escape the rat race. If one relocates here with an East Coast work ethic, it becomes pretty easy to get promoted and become a rock star at your job. This is the land of mañana.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 10-07-2015 at 08:52 PM..
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Old 10-07-2015, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
I also grew up in Massachusetts. Though I will agree with some bolehboleh's sentiments, I do think people in Mass are more friendly than given credit for. They are definitely tough nuts to crack. I have spent a lot of time on the North Shore and Cape Cod, I consider people on the Cape to be friendlier, laid back, and more open to chat. But yes there will definitely be encounters to the ornery side of people in the state as well. I wouldn't say its fair to characterize Bostonians as powder kegs, that wasn't my experience. I guess it just depends on what circles one hangs around in. Some of the most caring, genuine, and compassionate people I know are in Massachusetts.
I'd argue that the friendliest place I've been in the Baystate is the South Coast. It seems that whenever I'm in Fall River or New Bedford, people are more open and kind.

I grew up in the Lowell area and people always seemed kind of "grumpy." I still prefer Mass to just about any other state in the union.
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Old 10-08-2015, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Center City
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I grew up in Delaware where I also got my undergraduate degree. After graduate school in Virginia, I did stints in Massachusetts and Missouri before landing in Texas in my late 20s. Texas and its people were by far the most "exotic" of any of theses states compared to Delaware. For the first of my years in Houston, I was struck in the very different culture of Texas - the palm trees, margaritas outside in January, Latino influence, the oversized pride of its natives, the politics, the inclination of people to show their wealth (big houses, flashy cars, and Rolexes), big bugs, etc. For most of my 26 years there, I appreciated and took advantage of all that Texas offered (well, all except for the politics and the bugs). That said, I never considered myself a Texan. I experienced Teaxas as some mixture of a tourist and an anthropologist.

Just as a fish does't know it's in water, however, it was only after I left the east coast that I appreciated its richness - four seasons, vibrant downtowns, proximity to cultural centers, the beautiful and varied topography, its unique energy, and the people. While I continued to enjoy Texas while living there, my appreciation for the northeast only grew, and we decided once we had a good opportunity to leave Texas, we would head back east. And here we are.

Last edited by Pine to Vine; 10-08-2015 at 06:44 AM..
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Old 10-18-2015, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Yes. I moved from Miami to Texas. Totally different ball park. Miami is practically not even America.
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