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Old 10-09-2015, 09:50 PM
 
8,224 posts, read 10,784,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theluckygal View Post
I recently moved to North Carolina from southern Virginia. It was a country side town where I lived & people were so friendly. You hardly came across someone who didn't smile at you or said hello. Since North Carolina is south of Virginia, I expected people here to be more friendly but I was very disappointed. They rarely make eye contact or say hello. Even the people you run into on a daily basis are unfriendly, cold & distant. I still managed to make a few friends though but it took a lot of effort. I discussed this with some other people who migrated here from other states & they told me they felt people here were less friendly as well, so its not just me. This is a mid-size town & not too busy. I heard there a lot of people here who moved from the north & perhaps that's why they are cold & distant. Even in close spaces like the elevator people never make eye contact. I have traveled to towns that are an hour away from here & I see a huge shift in attitudes. These are smaller towns where people are very friendly & affectionate. So I guess it depends a lot on the size of the town rather than the state. If its a small town, then people are friendly. That's what I understood from my experience.
Wow!

Add another person(me) who experienced the same thing.
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Old 10-10-2015, 12:01 AM
 
1,882 posts, read 2,841,143 times
Reputation: 3886
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodmockingbird View Post
In Oklahoma, we are extremely friendly and outgoing. It is normal for strangers to talk, such as while waiting in line. Men open doors for women and the elderly. We stop to help at car wrecks, things like that.

Visitors are astounded at how friendly we are. They don't understand it.

I think it goes back to our extreme and unpredictable weather, because people do have to help one another out.
I can attest to this. Apart from Oklahoma City, which was a sketchy place, the rest of Oklahoma was very, very friendly.

People mentioned North Carolina, and I can attest to that too. Which, personally, I have always put down to mountain people. I grew up right where the Appalachian Trail begins in GA and all my people are from there on both sides of the family, off the boat from England and Scotland. They landed and settled and never strayed.

So, from living there and growing up and then, moving to South Carolina (Greenville to be precise) I was really taken by how amazingly friendly the Piedmont area of SC was. Because North GA, North Carolina, etc had never struck me as particularly friendly. Not at ALL in fact- a bumper sticker I often saw back then says it all- "Welcome to the South- Now Go Home".
Mountain people- real mountain people that go back for generations like my family- are suspicious as HELL of outsiders, don't cotton to people right off, give you the stare when you walk into a gas station. It wasn't til I moved and then came BACK to GA that I realized how marked it was. It was a feeling of finally recognizing that unease I had always felt. I mean, I hate to be stereotypical but "Deliverance"- I mean, it happens. Those people, they exist.
My poor exhubby was a Yankee and I could not BELIEVE the crap he had to put up with. He worked construction in the south for years and his whole manner was so offputting to good ol' boys, I had to teach him how to talk to them so they wouldn't knock him up side his head= I told him you have to talk about the weather and fishing and stuff, and smile smile smile. Eventually they warm up, but some of those guys are like mules, just waiting for the chance to kick you. Its terrible, but its my experience.

Los Angeles is really friendly, actually. One of the friendlier cities I have lived in.

South Carolina, like I said, those people are ridiculously friendly. The Piedmont where I lived wasn't the most culturally riveting place but the people were distinctly live-and-let-live there.

Chicago- amazing people. Couldn't believe it.

Atlanta has gotten amazingly more friendly since Obama became president. Not kidding. I used to live in Atlanta back in the day and then moved back for nearly a year after his second term. I was nearly shocked at the contrast- pleasantly shocked. People actually talked to you on the bus and at bus stops- there was no more of that invisible wall I always used to feel in Atlanta between black and white. It used to be REAL clear that you weren't wanted around in areas in ATL that were largely black- I could tell all kinds of stories about that. I got it, I understood it, it didn't turn me into a racist but things happened. Now, different story. I am much more at ease there than I have ever been previously. Despite the growing crime rate....
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Old 10-10-2015, 04:46 AM
 
190 posts, read 134,053 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
The OP may just be the first person I've heard describe the people of FL as friendly. I wonder what part of FL, because I can assure you, after 3 years in southeast FL, we were happy to leave. I think NJ natives are friendly, even more so than where we are now, GA. But I've managed to make friends pretty much everywhere we end up, so attitude helps.
Florida now in most places is very standoffish and the dating scene is down right next to horrible.. Tampa/St Pete really got worse I find. You have to have specific interests to make it in the area where you could talk to more people maybe but its still hard even for people like that too.
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Old 10-10-2015, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,783 posts, read 4,836,241 times
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East Tennessee! Super friendly people everywhere we go. It's one of thee reasons we moved here.
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Old 10-10-2015, 04:49 PM
 
Location: IN
20,848 posts, read 35,952,730 times
Reputation: 13292
This is a VERY subjective question because of the high degree of variability within parts of states, town by town basis, etc. It also depends on whether the individual is an extrovert or introvert. Some areas of the US tend to attract certain personality types of individuals. This clustering, for example, is apparent in places like Seattle- a tech hub. The Pacific Northwest is good for introverts but might not be nearly as good for extroverts.
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Old 10-11-2015, 02:33 AM
 
Location: SGV
24,797 posts, read 9,655,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by middle-aged mom View Post
The friendliness, or lack thereof, of other people depends on you.

Friendly people rarely have a problem meeting other friendly people.
Wherever you go there you are.

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Old 10-11-2015, 04:12 AM
 
Location: Northern Ireland and temporarily England
7,668 posts, read 4,139,644 times
Reputation: 1373
Florida is the friendliest I would say. It is definitely NOT NYC or Virginia!
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Old 10-11-2015, 04:15 AM
 
Location: Northern Ireland and temporarily England
7,668 posts, read 4,139,644 times
Reputation: 1373
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
I lived all of my pre-retirement life in Rhode Island; now we live in Maine. While some folks think New Englanders are self-absorbed and not friendly, I disagree. Sure, in the bigger cities (Boston, Worcester, Providence etc) where they are 'metro' and sophisticated, that can be the case. But in the smaller towns and rural areas, it's very different. They may take a little longer to warm up to you, but once they do, you will not find a more loyal friend anywhere.
I don't think they are sophisticated, just stuck up and impatient. People in big American cities are just plain rude.

I have so many stories of how pathetic people treated us in NYC. Washington was not that bad, however, people were definitely very, very impatient there.

I got a lot of tuts because I couldn't move fast enough. I always confronted them (not used to people tutting at me) and then proceeded to slow down 10x more, of course they nearly had a little canary, I guess they aren't used to people confronting them. They should expect to be confronted if they are going to tut at strangers because they don't move through a ticket machine 2 seconds faster. How rude.
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Old 10-11-2015, 04:20 AM
 
Location: Northern Ireland and temporarily England
7,668 posts, read 4,139,644 times
Reputation: 1373
Quote:
Originally Posted by nighthouse66 View Post
I can attest to this. Apart from Oklahoma City, which was a sketchy place, the rest of Oklahoma was very, very friendly.

People mentioned North Carolina, and I can attest to that too. Which, personally, I have always put down to mountain people. I grew up right where the Appalachian Trail begins in GA and all my people are from there on both sides of the family, off the boat from England and Scotland. They landed and settled and never strayed.

So, from living there and growing up and then, moving to South Carolina (Greenville to be precise) I was really taken by how amazingly friendly the Piedmont area of SC was. Because North GA, North Carolina, etc had never struck me as particularly friendly. Not at ALL in fact- a bumper sticker I often saw back then says it all- "Welcome to the South- Now Go Home".
Mountain people- real mountain people that go back for generations like my family- are suspicious as HELL of outsiders, don't cotton to people right off, give you the stare when you walk into a gas station. It wasn't til I moved and then came BACK to GA that I realized how marked it was. It was a feeling of finally recognizing that unease I had always felt. I mean, I hate to be stereotypical but "Deliverance"- I mean, it happens. Those people, they exist.
My poor exhubby was a Yankee and I could not BELIEVE the crap he had to put up with. He worked construction in the south for years and his whole manner was so offputting to good ol' boys, I had to teach him how to talk to them so they wouldn't knock him up side his head= I told him you have to talk about the weather and fishing and stuff, and smile smile smile. Eventually they warm up, but some of those guys are like mules, just waiting for the chance to kick you. Its terrible, but its my experience.

Los Angeles is really friendly, actually. One of the friendlier cities I have lived in.

South Carolina, like I said, those people are ridiculously friendly. The Piedmont where I lived wasn't the most culturally riveting place but the people were distinctly live-and-let-live there.

Chicago- amazing people. Couldn't believe it.

Atlanta has gotten amazingly more friendly since Obama became president. Not kidding. I used to live in Atlanta back in the day and then moved back for nearly a year after his second term. I was nearly shocked at the contrast- pleasantly shocked. People actually talked to you on the bus and at bus stops- there was no more of that invisible wall I always used to feel in Atlanta between black and white. It used to be REAL clear that you weren't wanted around in areas in ATL that were largely black- I could tell all kinds of stories about that. I got it, I understood it, it didn't turn me into a racist but things happened. Now, different story. I am much more at ease there than I have ever been previously. Despite the growing crime rate....
When we went to New York a lot of black cashiers treated us like absolute dirt - we did not receive poor customer service from any white cashiers. We weren't sure if it was because we were white but to this day we are still shocked that people think like that in a first world country.
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Old 10-11-2015, 05:17 AM
 
3,062 posts, read 1,565,036 times
Reputation: 3202
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
When I moved to Texas about 26 years ago, the debate was whether the state motto would be The Lone Star State or The Friendly State. So...

Either way, the manners and the friendliness was a huge departure from the four years I had spent in Southern California. Culture shock.
That is a nice thing to say about my home state. I do love where I live now which is in South Florida because of the variety of people. However, it's not small town Texas friendly, which I do have complaints about but nothing I can't overcome.

Anyway, I found a friendlier place than Texas but it is not in the States. It's Calgary.
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