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Old 10-10-2015, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Miami, Floroda
650 posts, read 603,182 times
Reputation: 371

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I do think your really limiting your options by 20,000 warm climate.

Ever heard of colleges like University of Michigan and Northwestern? Yeah excellent universities but they're in a cold climate and more than 20,000. Your shutting yourself out of excellent educational opportunities.
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Old 10-10-2015, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,501,291 times
Reputation: 15950
One of the nicest smaller college-centered communities I know of is Oneonta, NY, off I-88 and about halfway between Binghamton and Albany.

The town has a permanent population of 14,000 and is home to two colleges: Hartwick is a small non-denominational liberal arts school with an enrollment of about 1500. There's also a branch of the State University of New York (SUNY) with about 5000 students.

What might most interest our OP is a collection of commercial buildings, mostly dating from the early years of the 20th century, and well-preserved -- so much so that the community was used for on-location filming of the gangster saga The Outfit in the early 1990's. It's also located on the western fringe of the Catskills, and about 15 miles from the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, so lodging can get a bit pricey during the summer tourist season.

Manhattan is about a four-hour drive away, and Adirondack Trailways offers direct bus service. And there is some very interesting history in the areas surrounding Oneonta itself, once one learns where to look.

Further to the south, Pennsylvania maintains a system of about a dozen of what used to be called "teachers' colleges", all of which were deliberately sited in smaller communities. Although the curricula were long since broadened to include many disciplines, education remains the principal focus, and each campus specializes in one specialty -- Kutztown for art, Mansfield for music, West Chester for Phys Ed, etc.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 10-10-2015 at 09:41 PM..
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Old 10-10-2015, 10:07 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,244,373 times
Reputation: 9846
Ithaca
Burlington
Saratoga
Chapel Hill
Oxford
San Luis Obispo

I think these are some of the better ones, and come closest to fitting most of your criteria.
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Old 10-10-2015, 10:38 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33051
^^Ithaca's climate is about as bad as Northfield's!
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Old 10-11-2015, 12:55 AM
 
890 posts, read 1,093,570 times
Reputation: 730
Most small college towns are in places that don't meet the temperature requirement because the US population had been more concentrated further north and further east, and the newer colleges built in southern and western places are trying to be as large as possible. The other thing is that there are a lot of small college towns that meet your temperature requirement in Kentucky, but aren't near transit lines. I had a friend who went to Centre College in Danville, KY, which is a highly rated liberal arts college, but outside of the bus to Lexington didn't have much transportation. Western Kentucky University and Morehead State University are rated in the top 20 Southern public universities, but Morehead is far from populated areas, and Bowling Green, KY, where WKU is located, had its Amtrak service taken away about ten years ago, although it is less than an hour's bus ride to Nashville, and an hour and a half to Louisville. In Virginia, you have lots of college campuses with some but little train service, but they're all in places that exceed 20,000.
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Old 10-11-2015, 03:03 AM
 
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
204 posts, read 162,702 times
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These are all really good suggestions, even the ones that don't fit the population or temperature requirements!
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Old 10-11-2015, 03:05 AM
 
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
204 posts, read 162,702 times
Reputation: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
One of the nicest smaller college-centered communities I know of is Oneonta, NY, off I-88 and about halfway between Binghamton and Albany.

The town has a permanent population of 14,000 and is home to two colleges: Hartwick is a small non-denominational liberal arts school with an enrollment of about 1500. There's also a branch of the State University of New York (SUNY) with about 5000 students.

What might most interest our OP is a collection of commercial buildings, mostly dating from the early years of the 20th century, and well-preserved -- so much so that the community was used for on-location filming of the gangster saga The Outfit in the early 1990's. It's also located on the western fringe of the Catskills, and about 15 miles from the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, so lodging can get a bit pricey during the summer tourist season.

Manhattan is about a four-hour drive away, and Adirondack Trailways offers direct bus service. And there is some very interesting history in the areas surrounding Oneonta itself, once one learns where to look.

Further to the south, Pennsylvania maintains a system of about a dozen of what used to be called "teachers' colleges", all of which were deliberately sited in smaller communities. Although the curricula were long since broadened to include many disciplines, education remains the principal focus, and each campus specializes in one specialty -- Kutztown for art, Mansfield for music, West Chester for Phys Ed, etc.

Really, really enticing suggestion.

I 'm going to have to look at Hartwick College, in particular.
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Old 10-11-2015, 03:14 AM
 
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
204 posts, read 162,702 times
Reputation: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by dxdtdemon View Post
Most small college towns are in places that don't meet the temperature requirement because the US population had been more concentrated further north and further east, and the newer colleges built in southern and western places are trying to be as large as possible. The other thing is that there are a lot of small college towns that meet your temperature requirement in Kentucky, but aren't near transit lines. I had a friend who went to Centre College in Danville, KY, which is a highly rated liberal arts college, but outside of the bus to Lexington didn't have much transportation. Western Kentucky University and Morehead State University are rated in the top 20 Southern public universities, but Morehead is far from populated areas, and Bowling Green, KY, where WKU is located, had its Amtrak service taken away about ten years ago, although it is less than an hour's bus ride to Nashville, and an hour and a half to Louisville. In Virginia, you have lots of college campuses with some but little train service, but they're all in places that exceed 20,000.
Very good point.

I now realize may have to compromise by going to a college in a town with a population of 20,000 or higher to get the walkability, historic charm, and transit options/access to major transportation hubs.

It'll probably also have to be in some place like east Virginia or in the southern rim of the Frostbelt/northern rim of the sunbelt out west in order to get the ubiquitous historic town charm with walkability while being within my temperature range.
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Old 10-11-2015, 03:45 AM
 
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
204 posts, read 162,702 times
Reputation: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanRam View Post
College of William and Mary sounds like the ideal place for you to go to college. It's in Williamsburg, Virginia, which is full of historic colonial building.

Other cool college towns:

Madison, Wisconsin
Iowa City, Iowa (the best in my opinion)
Lawrence, Kansas
Bloomington, Illinois
Champaign-Urbana, Illinois (I think it sucks, but it's considered one of the best)
Bloomington, Indiana
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Athens, Georgia
Well, given that Williamsburg easily fits all the requirements, I think we have a winner here.

Let's see, It has Amtrak service that comes from Richmond and a local bus service; is extremely walkable and overwhelmingly historic at its core; has a good college within easy walking distance of a relatively vibrant downtown and a charming, colonial, historic district; meets the population requirements; is about as dense and compact as I'd like it to be at it's core; Meets the average temperature requirements:


Oh, and one other thing, I've actually visited Williamsburg (about 6 or 7 years ago, on a non-college excursion with my Grandmother),

and as a rising College Freshman with a high school GPA of 3.5 and ACT score of 32,

I think I could find a good fit at William and Mary College in Virginia.

I will consider other colleges(due to the fact that my dad might not pay the exorbitant tuition fees), though, and I still am open to suggestions.
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Old 10-11-2015, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Maryland
4,268 posts, read 5,475,910 times
Reputation: 4594
Don't limit yourself by climate--you will miss out on some of the best universities and college towns in the U.S. if you do.
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