U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-12-2015, 02:38 AM
 
1,592 posts, read 891,853 times
Reputation: 1152

Advertisements

For those of you who lived in rundown cities (high urban blight) but decided to move elsewhere, which destination was the most opposite in that regard (little to no urban blight)?

Also, how shocking was the difference to you? Would it have made you move sooner?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-12-2015, 04:56 AM
 
21,193 posts, read 30,379,606 times
Reputation: 19627
I gutted it out in a blighted (yet transitional) neighborhood in Philadelphia for almost 5 years and moved to Central Florida (near Orlando) to be closer to elderly parents. The first couple of weeks were pleasantly shocking minus extensive litter on sidewalks and street, filthy air and general decay but one adjusts quickly. In retrospect would I have moved sooner (or not moved there at all)....a resounding yes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2015, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,633 posts, read 2,784,561 times
Reputation: 2981
^I have always wondered why your username was 19125. Idk when you are talking about living there but in the past years things have changed quite a bit. You honestly would be probably be shocked by how much has been built on Frankford Ave. Hipsters just love it around there so much. The north end of 19125 towards Kensington Ave. is still sketchy.

People love this area: http://www.nytimes.com/video/fashion/100000002661311/urban-grit-fashion-in-philadelphia-fishtown-intersection.html

[vimeo]95723291[/vimeo]
https://vimeo.com/95723291

Anyway I can give kind of a reverse perspective. I took a job in Raleigh, NC and moved to North Raleigh. I quickly realized my idea of fun wasn't really playing quizzo in a parking lot of a mall or going to the Angus Barn as fine dining (I will say the fried food/bbq was on point though). It was just like living in a giant suburb with those kind of 2-3 story apartment complex buildings tucked behind some trees off of a busy highway like road. Also, forgive me for generalizing but, it seemed that the % of people you would deem a "Bro" is way higher. An intellectual night with the people I knew was going to a wine and paint night. There is nothing wrong with all this stuff. I just felt like it was 1. Boring 2. Could literally have been any suburb in America. 3. Seemed most young people were just trying to extend their frat boy years another year or two.

Moving to Philly was somewhat liberating for me. Just the sheer amount of things going on was probably the first shocking thing. It never stops. I went to Old City Fest yesterday and their literally is no way to compare a place like Raleigh/Orlando.

The more I think about it, the more I realize it is definitely the social aspect of being in a old dense city that I prefer over the new growth cities. As someone who grew up in that purely white upper middle class world, just coming face to face with so many different people from completely different walks of life is cool to me. There is sort of an authenticity to Philadelphia that makes it special, and in my opinion, places like Raleigh/Orlando just don't at all.

To sum up, I would take a more rundown city if 1. the older city has better vibrant neighborhoods. 2. Has better cultural institutions/events. 3. walkability/bikeability/public transpiration 4. Better city parks/recreational space. 4. Better bar/restaurant culture (Not a club guy personally) 5. Better homegrown stores (creative class type places). Just my opinion and not all old dense cities are the same.

Last edited by thedirtypirate; 10-12-2015 at 08:18 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2015, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
1,014 posts, read 3,119,644 times
Reputation: 483
In 1994 my job had transferred me out to Columbus Ohio from Philly . I was living in the Fishtown/19125 area before all the gentrification took place and hipsters ,yuppies , and artsy types moving in. It was a ethnic gritty working class area dotted with corner stores and shot and a beer type corner bars where the only "food " that was sold were bags of potato chips and peanuts, Slim Jims and hard boiled eggs. Some blocks were well kept with small row houses kept in families for generations and other blocks were gritty looking . Frankford Avenue itself had a couple of corner bars , a couple of small mom and pop grocery stores and only one restaurant which was an old school grease spoon breakfast and lunch joint on the corner of Norris ( their breakfast sandwiches were the best) but most of the other buildings were vacant and unused. The Market- Frankford El was only a block and a half away from where I lived and I would always hear the trains while inside the row house I was renting at the time .
There were two bus lines that went right pass my door . I only lived a block from Frankford Ave. which had another major bus line . I didn't have to drive or need a car.
When I moved to Columbus I went into culture shock! Much of the city itself was very post war suburban like with 1950s/60s split level ,both raised and ground ranch and Cape Cod housing stock 1970s/80s apartment and townhouse complexes , strip shopping centers and you need a car in many neighborhoods. Most of the urban walkable areas surrounded the downtown . There is a couple of urban walkable inner ring burbs ( ie Grandview Hts. Central Bexley near Capitol University but the rest of the city and suburbs were sprawling . Some of the older suburbs do have their walkable downtown areas lined with shops, bars and restaurants but as you get further away from those areas the more sprawling and auto centric it becomes.

Last edited by otters21; 10-12-2015 at 10:36 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2015, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,633 posts, read 2,784,561 times
Reputation: 2981
Quote:
In 1994 my job had transferred me out to Columbus Ohio from Philly . I was living in the Fishtown/19125 area before all the gentrification took place and hipsters ,yuppies , and artsy types moving in. It was a ethnic gritty working class area dotted with corner stores and shot and a beer type corner bars where the only "food " that was sold were bags of potato chips and peanuts, Slim Jims and hard boiled eggs.
Interesting lol. Almost sounds like you should come take a visit again
La Colombe's HQ is right on Frankford: Cafes – La Colombe Coffee Roasters
Pizza Brain is often ranked one of the best pizza places in the US: press | pizza brain
One of the best Beer Gardens: Frankford Hall,Philadelphia - America's Best Beer Gardens | Travel + Leisure
New boutique hotel: Changing Skyline: Developer Roland Kassis transforming Fishtown into hip haven - philly-archives

So much going on these days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2015, 11:48 AM
 
1,592 posts, read 891,853 times
Reputation: 1152
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
Anyway I can give kind of a reverse perspective.
Those make for great stories as well. I appreciate the perspective.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2015, 02:28 PM
 
21,193 posts, read 30,379,606 times
Reputation: 19627
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
^I have always wondered why your username was 19125. Idk when you are talking about living there but in the past years things have changed quite a bit. You honestly would be probably be shocked by how much has been built on Frankford Ave. Hipsters just love it around there so much. The north end of 19125 towards Kensington Ave. is still sketchy.

People love this area: http://www.nytimes.com/video/fashion/100000002661311/urban-grit-fashion-in-philadelphia-fishtown-intersection.html

[vimeo]95723291[/vimeo]
[vimeo]95723291[/vimeo]
https://vimeo.com/95723291

Anyway I can give kind of a reverse perspective. I took a job in Raleigh, NC and moved to North Raleigh. I quickly realized my idea of fun wasn't really playing quizzo in a parking lot of a mall or going to the Angus Barn as fine dining (I will say the fried food/bbq was on point though). It was just like living in a giant suburb with those kind of 2-3 story apartment complex buildings tucked behind some trees off of a busy highway like road. Also, forgive me for generalizing but, it seemed that the % of people you would deem a "Bro" is way higher. An intellectual night with the people I knew was going to a wine and paint night. There is nothing wrong with all this stuff. I just felt like it was 1. Boring 2. Could literally have been any suburb in America. 3. Seemed most young people were just trying to extend their frat boy years another year or two.

Moving to Philly was somewhat liberating for me. Just the sheer amount of things going on was probably the first shocking thing. It never stops. I went to Old City Fest yesterday and their literally is no way to compare a place like Raleigh/Orlando.

The more I think about it, the more I realize it is definitely the social aspect of being in a old dense city that I prefer over the new growth cities. As someone who grew up in that purely white upper middle class world, just coming face to face with so many different people from completely different walks of life is cool to me. There is sort of an authenticity to Philadelphia that makes it special, and in my opinion, places like Raleigh/Orlando just don't at all.

To sum up, I would take a more rundown city if 1. the older city has better vibrant neighborhoods. 2. Has better cultural institutions/events. 3. walkability/bikeability/public transpiration 4. Better city parks/recreational space. 4. Better bar/restaurant culture (Not a club guy personally) 5. Better homegrown stores (creative class type places). Just my opinion and not all old dense cities are the same.
LOL. I can offer a another perspective of how things have changed, in the reverse. Durham has become everything North Raleigh is not with actual urban character (old tobacco warehouses, etc) and vibrant downtown neighborhoods, still not transit buzzworthy but definitely more walkable/bikeable, nice redeveloped greenspace, a nationally recognized restaurant scene (yep really, google it), is now one of the most educated cities in the US on average which has lead to the expansion of an already impressive cultural/arts community. All minus the filth and safety issues associated with the "big city".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2015, 04:47 PM
 
1,592 posts, read 891,853 times
Reputation: 1152
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
All minus the filth and safety issues associated with the "big city".
Reminds me of Sim City. When things were kept small, my cities were safe and clean. When they got big, things got "complicated".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2015, 10:21 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,567,437 times
Reputation: 2194
Quote:
Originally Posted by svendrell View Post
Reminds me of Sim City. When things were kept small, my cities were safe and clean. When they got big, things got "complicated".
lol. very true. I loved sim city
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2015, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Columbus,Ohio
1,014 posts, read 3,119,644 times
Reputation: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
Interesting lol. Almost sounds like you should come take a visit again
La Colombe's HQ is right on Frankford: Cafes – La Colombe Coffee Roasters
Pizza Brain is often ranked one of the best pizza places in the US: press | pizza brain
One of the best Beer Gardens: Frankford Hall,Philadelphia - America's Best Beer Gardens | Travel + Leisure
New boutique hotel: Changing Skyline: Developer Roland Kassis transforming Fishtown into hip haven - philly-archives

So much going on these days.
I tried to rep you but unfortunately City Data would not let me. I got that aggravating message "You must spread the reputation around. I wish CD would lift that rule or get a "like" button.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top