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Old 10-16-2015, 02:27 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,728,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
I've tried to argue this multiple times in countless threads on CD and everyone acts as if I'm completely insane.

I think, in general, most Americans have no idea what Canadians sound like.
Or Californians apparently.

 
Old 10-16-2015, 02:30 PM
 
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I'll never understand why people on this forum, care so much about Upper Midwest accents.
 
Old 10-16-2015, 09:29 PM
 
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My primary interest (as a lifelong Great Lakes resident) is actually the Inland North accent, which I only became aware of a few months ago, and have started to notice elements of in my own speech.

I'm starting to regret mentioning Canada, as that seems to be taking over the discussion. I only included that accent in the discussion because somebody I know with a thick NCVS-afflicted Chicago accent pronounces words like "though" and "sorry" in a similar manner to thicker Canadian accents.

I also know some Chicagoans who have a very distinct Northern Wisconsin/Minnesota element to their accents, while others do not (the common element between them all being the raised // sound).

Last edited by NorthShoreLine; 10-16-2015 at 09:42 PM..
 
Old 10-16-2015, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,377 posts, read 1,194,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Or Californians apparently.
Canadians (at least all of Canada west of Lake Superior) and Californians all speak like they can't open their lips all the way.

"Mohm, can you put thot letter in the mailbohx? Dod forgoht it."
 
Old 10-16-2015, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Peoria, AZ
952 posts, read 1,077,787 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
One of the most distinctive linguistic features of this region as a whole is the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, which is present from Syracuse west all the way to Minneapolis.

Besides that, rural Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois tend to have more of a Midlands Accent; Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and the Dakotas have the more distinct North Central Accent. Michigan is interesting; in the Lower Peninsula, the accents can be close to those in Indiana and Ohio with a significant influence from Detroit's urban, working poor. The Upper Peninsula has one of the most distinct accents anywhere in the country, similar to-- but not identical to-- the accent found in Minnesota's Iron Range.
I've always thought that the Michigan accent (in the lower peninsula) sounds like a cross between the Canadian accent and the accent found in the Chicagoland area. It is definitely more distinct than the accents found in rural Indiana and Ohio. Toledo, however, does tend to have more of a Michigan-sounding accent.
 
Old 10-16-2015, 11:26 PM
 
172 posts, read 91,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
One of the most distinctive linguistic features of this region as a whole is the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, which is present from Syracuse west all the way to Minneapolis.

Besides that, rural Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois tend to have more of a Midlands Accent; Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and the Dakotas have the more distinct North Central Accent. Michigan is interesting; in the Lower Peninsula, the accents can be close to those in Indiana and Ohio with a significant influence from Detroit's urban, working poor. The Upper Peninsula has one of the most distinct accents anywhere in the country, similar to-- but not identical to-- the accent found in Minnesota's Iron Range.
Minneapolis doesn't have the ncvs. I'm from mpls so I know.
 
Old 10-18-2015, 12:22 PM
 
790 posts, read 1,051,731 times
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The thing is that Canadian English is a hybrid of British English and American English.

If you can find it, there was a really cool documentary on CBC that discussed how Canadian English is different than American English. And how American English has changed (in someways) Canadian English.

I'm in the Detroit area and there's a lot of cross-border activity and sometimes you really notice when someone is from Canada. Other times, you don't.
 
Old 10-18-2015, 04:37 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
The thing is that Canadian English is a hybrid of British English and American English.

If you can find it, there was a really cool documentary on CBC that discussed how Canadian English is different than American English. And how American English has changed (in someways) Canadian English.

I'm in the Detroit area and there's a lot of cross-border activity and sometimes you really notice when someone is from Canada. Other times, you don't.
But would you say that the hybridization is weighted towards a Canadian retention of American English's archaisms or because it followed British English's progressive development over the last couple centuries?
 
Old 10-18-2015, 07:17 PM
 
19 posts, read 21,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
The thing is that Canadian English is a hybrid of British English and American English.

If you can find it, there was a really cool documentary on CBC that discussed how Canadian English is different than American English. And how American English has changed (in someways) Canadian English.

I'm in the Detroit area and there's a lot of cross-border activity and sometimes you really notice when someone is from Canada. Other times, you don't.
There is no such thing as a canadian accent.
 
Old 10-18-2015, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,347 posts, read 7,421,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazingbeyond View Post
That MAY be the case for you in Windsor as it's a working class city, but for those of us in Toronto "aboat" is uncommon and weird. I don't think you realize just how American younger people are sounding these days. We do NOT want to sound Canadian.
Really? That's too bad. I, for one, find the stereotypical Canadian accent to be very charming, not to mention that I was just in Ontario last week and, at least in the areas of Essex County and Chatham-Kent where I was, "oat" (out) and "aboat" (about) are alive and well. I also love "proe-gress" (progress), "proe-cess" (process) and "AH-dlt" (adult).

I grew up in NW Ohio and have lived in SE Michigan for the past 18 years. I work as a telephone triage nurse and spend most of my work days speaking to people in California and Oregon. I have had several of them tell me that I have a Minnesota accent, a Michigan accent, or even a Canadian accent, all of which I proudly claim!

Accents and dialects make life interesting. Wouldn't it be boring if we all sounded exactly the same?

Last edited by canudigit; 10-18-2015 at 10:05 PM..
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