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Old 10-29-2015, 12:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
Yes the northeast is different buthere in themidwest we have evanston which is somewhat like the towns you listed above (despite being in the heart of a major metro area). But I don't find evanston in the category of ann arbor, madison, iowa city, or bloomington.
I don't really think the Madison is in the same category as Iowa City because it is 1/2 UW and 1/2 state capital as opposed to full out college town.
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Old 10-30-2015, 09:50 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
Tempe is a suburb of Phoenix. If you are in Tempe you physically cannot tell when Tempe ends and the other suburbs begin for the most part unless you familiarized yourself with the borders. ASU's student population is very spread out because they have more than one campus. There's an ASU campus that's on the other side of the valley out west in Glendale. There's also ASU's Downtown campus in Phoenix and they have a campus out in Gilbert (sort of far east in the metro) on top of the Tempe campus. So it's not like all of the ASU students live/work/play in Tempe, in fact I would say most of them live outside of Tempe and in the other suburbs due to the fact Tempe is smaller in size. Also out of all the ASU students I know, most of them go to parties in Old Town Scottsdale instead of staying in Tempe. So in other words, ASU's college scene is spread out across the entire metro, though somewhat centralized still.

So at this point it is asking if the Phoenix metro itself is a "college metro" since you can find ASU students everywhere in the valley. Considering Phoenix is home to the largest university in the nation (University of Phoenix), and another extremely large university known as Grand Canyon University, not too mention there is a large community college system in Phoenix as well. Despite all this, I don't think the colleges "dominates" Phoenix in any way even though the four of them have high enrollments. I would say most people associate the Phoenix metro with something other than U of Phoenix or ASU at first.
I don't think ASU's branch campuses around the valley downplay Tempe's role as a college town. Mill Ave, the campus, and Sun Devil stadium in Tempe all pretty epitomize what a typical American college town would have. Tempe's borders to me are easy, pretty much the square containing everything between the 202/Red Mountain, 101/Price, 60/Superstition freeways and Sky Harbor Airport. How many people are really confusing Tempe with Mesa? Tempe definitely feels different with a much different vibe than other valley cities. I think the only thing that really downplays the role of Tempe as a college town is that ASU has a higher ratio of commuters, where as Tucson likely has more students living on or around campus.
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Old 11-06-2015, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
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Princeton, NJ comes to mind when someone mentions a 'College Town'. Both the town and namesake university have grown together over the years. Services off campus allow for a pleasant existence for both student and area residents.

I'm in Stony Brook, NY which is home to one of the flagship NYS universities, Stony Brook University. Unlike Princeton, our community was founded in the several hundred years before SBU was ever conceived -- we were still a colony at that point. There is a small historic area with a shopping, dining, and an inn catering to tourists.

The university was built as a small teachers college on some donated land in the mid 1960's. It has grown in leaps and bounds; the school wound up using eminent domain to seize an undeveloped property immediately to the west. While expanding, there was a failure to increase dormitory housing with relation to the larger student population. That forced many students out into the surrounding neighborhoods which consisted of single 3 bedroom family homes. Unscrupulous landlords buy these when they go up for sale, carving them into illegal boarding houses which house far more than should safely reside there, and then create a host of other problems in the area. Our community has a New England feel and appeal which is slowly being stripped away by interests who do not even live in the impacted area.

Someone at the university came up with the idea that this is a 'college town' and said we should be like Princeton. They further added that the main road to the north of SBU (which has stores the locals use) should be reconfigured to allow easier access from the campus, across the rail road, to connect this portion of the community to the school. They want apartments built, and it be made more appealing for the students. Gone are the hardware store, card shop, book store and in are the 2 Asian groceries (catering to the foreign student population) 2 pizzerias, 2 Chinese restaurants, a pub, a Dunkin Donuts.

Those of us who live here are being told we're racists and xenophobes if we complain. We're told that students (who are usually not known for having deep pockets) need stores to shop. I no longer have a supermarket in my own area. We're already suffering from our home values decreasing as illegal boarding houses spring up like mushrooms after the rain.

It's like living adjacent to The Blob: it spills over taking things while it moves. With this gradual creep, we will go from a town with a college, to solely being a college adjacent to a its tourist area namesake.

I apologize for going on; as you can tell it is a very sore subject.
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Old 11-06-2015, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
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Newark, Delaware is where my alma mater of the University of Delaware is located, and I think the place definitely fits the bill as a college town. As one of the oldest universities in the country, UD has essentially shaped Newark's development for well over 175 years, if not from 1743, then at least from 1834. Nowadays, Newark is essentially synonymous with the University of Delaware, as the university dominates the area socially, economically and demographically. It's actually rare finding someone in the city who's NOT affiliated with the university in some shape or form, rather than someone who is; those who aren't typically work for the banks or plants in the area.
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Old 11-06-2015, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
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I think a true college town is one that's whole economy is based around the school/schools. I also think their are "University Cities", places that were once college towns but were able to diversify the economy enough to really grow leaps and bounds. I also think their are "University Districts" within the largest cities that are comparable to college towns. Philly might not be a full fledged college town, but ESPN's College Gameday is coming here 2 out of 3 weeks (Temple/ND, Army/Navy).
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Old 11-07-2015, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
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Im curious how Lafayette, La would be categorized.
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Old 11-09-2015, 02:19 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,517,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
I don't think that is necessarily true. Princeton, NJ, Hanover, NH, Northampton, Ma, Ithaca, NY are all college towns with private Colleges. Those are popular in the Northeast more than anywhere else just because of the higher concentration of private schools in the less dominating presence of public universities.
I honestly think the school in the town has to have a big athletics following to be really considered a college town. I know that technically doesn't matter at all, but I think that really does make a difference in what some would consider a college town or not.

Honestly (and this is bias coming in) but I think the picture perfect definition of a college town is Clemson, SC. As soon as you enter town, there are orange tiger paws painted on the roads, every business has a tiger paws painted on them or somehow incorporated with their logo, the main street in downtown Clemson leads right to the focal point of the campus in Tillman Hall and the town literally revolves around the university (in fact the university came before the town) THAT is a college town!
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Old 11-09-2015, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,231,676 times
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Percentage of Population 18 Years and Older Enrolled in College or Graduate School

East Lansing, MI - 70.8%
Ithaca, NY - 66.4%
Gainesville, FL - 43.7%
Chapel Hill, NC - 41.2%
Ann Arbor, MI - 41.1%
Tallahassee, FL - 36.2%
Berkeley, CA - 34.2%
Cambridge, MA - 31.3%
Madison, WI - 24.8%
Columbia, SC - 23.4%
Syracuse, NY - 22.0%
Boston, MA - 21.1%
Pittsburgh, PA - 19.9%
Baton Rouge - 19.0%
Raleigh, NC - 16.6%
Durham, NC - 16.5%
Austin, TX - 15.2%
Columbus, OH - 14.8%
South Bend, IN - 11.3%

Last edited by BajanYankee; 11-09-2015 at 03:04 PM..
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Old 11-09-2015, 03:47 PM
 
9,381 posts, read 9,536,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Percentage of Population 18 Years and Older Enrolled in College or Graduate School

East Lansing, MI - 70.8%
Ithaca, NY - 66.4%
Gainesville, FL - 43.7%
Chapel Hill, NC - 41.2%
Ann Arbor, MI - 41.1%
Tallahassee, FL - 36.2%
Berkeley, CA - 34.2%
Cambridge, MA - 31.3%
Madison, WI - 24.8%
Columbia, SC - 23.4%
Syracuse, NY - 22.0%
Boston, MA - 21.1%
Pittsburgh, PA - 19.9%
Baton Rouge - 19.0%
Raleigh, NC - 16.6%
Durham, NC - 16.5%
Austin, TX - 15.2%
Columbus, OH - 14.8%
South Bend, IN - 11.3%
Using those numbers, a college town must have 1 dominating college to really be considered a college town by most.
Boston and Cambridge together average 22.6% college students, but far more people would consider Columbus, South Bend, Austin or Baton Rouge a college town, despite having less college students.
But Columbus, South Bend, Austin and Baton Rouge are all dominated by one college, while Boston/Cambridge is split between BU, NU, Suffolk, MIT, Harvard, Simmons, Emerson, etc. so there is no unifying college culture.
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Old 11-09-2015, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,231,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Using those numbers, a college town must have 1 dominating college to really be considered a college town by most.
Boston and Cambridge together average 22.6% college students, but far more people would consider Columbus, South Bend, Austin or Baton Rouge a college town, despite having less college students.
But Columbus, South Bend, Austin and Baton Rouge are all dominated by one college, while Boston/Cambridge is split between BU, NU, Suffolk, MIT, Harvard, Simmons, Emerson, etc. so there is no unifying college culture.
Maybe. I think places like Ann Arbor and Columbus also have a college sports culture that most people associate with the undergraduate experience.


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