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View Poll Results: Which of these cities has the most generic/nondescript local culture?
Sacramento 17 25.00%
Arlington/Alexandria 9 13.24%
Tampa 12 17.65%
Des Moines 30 44.12%
Voters: 68. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-20-2015, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dude1984 View Post
Out of these four probably Tampa, but none of them really strike me as having a generic culture. My vote would go to Orlando and the Sunbelt cities of the Southwest.
ROTFL You picked the least generic region of the country.
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Old 10-20-2015, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX sucks
373 posts, read 265,478 times
Reputation: 241
I would put Dallas on this list also.
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Old 10-20-2015, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,512,703 times
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I think a lot of people conflating generic with boring. Generic means that it adheres to a genre. First, let's think about what genre the generic city is replicating. While cities like Des Moines or Grand Rapids might seem boring to someone who has never been there, they are not generic because they different from other cities in their regions. Des Moines, for instance has a very impressive skyline for a city its size. It also lacks ethnic diversity typical of Midwestern cities. Grand Rapids also lacks the sprawl typical of most Midwestern cities. It's also atypical because it's very economically and socially connected to two nearby cities: Holland and Muskegon (and to a lesser extent, Kalamazoo), yet their suburbs don't touch.

I'd say the most generic city is Rochester in the Northeast. Densely populated core, experiencing both decay and gentrification. Not built on grid. Dense suburbs with big trees that boarder farmland and forests. Generally pretty walkable. Good mix of industries; recovering relatively well from mid-20th-century deindustrialization, but there are still some problems. Few transplants. Very segregated. Metro area is growing, albeit slowly. Okay freeway infrastructure. Runner-up: Providence.

Charlotte in the South. A new downtown, near older neighborhoods that vary in terms of density. That's surrounded with transplant-heavy suburban sprawl, which is surrounded by more "Southern" rural areas. It's economy is pretty good, despite pockets of poverty. It's experiencing a bit of an identity crisis as it negotiates an influx of Northern transplants, shifting politics, and changing industry. Not on a grid. Many transplants. MSA growing rapidly. Good freeway infrastructure, yet traffic continues to be a problem. Due to private land, suburban development is patchy and uneven. Runner-up: Birmingham.

Indianapolis in the Midwest: Nearly a perfect grid, traversed by two interstates, and surrounded by a beltway. The downtown is revitalizing, but it's mostly geared toward offering after-work entertainment to suburbanites. Some urban neighborhoods are hip and trendy; others are falling apart. City-proper is surprisingly diverse and liberal. Suburban areas are very bland, sprawling, and conservative (more so than the Northeast, less so than the West). Few transplants. MSA is growing steadily. Runner-up: Milwaukee.

Albuquerque in the West: A very small urban core with interesting architecture that quickly deteriorates to suburban sprawl. Strong Hispanic and indigenous influence, but otherwise lacking ethnic diversity. Economic problems center around lack of diverse industries, rather than dying industries (such as in the rust belt). Popular political opinions cover a very wide spectrum. Very laid back. Nearly perfect grid. Traversed by two freeways. Most residence are transplants. Massive population explosion has since slowed significantly since the Great Recession. Runner-up: Fresno.

Last edited by Dawn.Davenport; 10-20-2015 at 06:11 PM..
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Old 10-20-2015, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,421 posts, read 11,926,143 times
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To me using the term "generic" essentially means areas which have achieved rapid population growth due to tons of transplants relocating there over the last twenty years, to the point that there is no distinctive local culture at all. I'd place Las Vegas, Phoenix, and Orlando highest on this measure nationally.
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Old 10-20-2015, 09:04 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,566,849 times
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I think what the op was talking about was a place where people are more american and less regional , not generic in a bad sense.

I definitely think alexandria doesnt belong here, even though its population is from all over, one of the most beautiful old towns in the country with with a very old south feel with cobblestone streets, arlington has arlington cemetery and the huge robert e lee mansion arlington house and alot of southern and american history, very cool areas like ballston as well. I havent been to Sacramento in a long time but it has old sac , there was definitely a californian identity when I was there as it is the capital , especially a norcal identity. I am not sure about the other places.

I would say the most generic places are places with the most suburban sprawl, no old towns, transient population, a few maryland suburbs of dc fit the bill , maybe some of fairfax county but definitely not alexandria or alot of arlington

wikimedia commons photo

old town alexandria

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Old 10-20-2015, 09:42 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
To me using the term "generic" essentially means areas which have achieved rapid population growth due to tons of transplants relocating there over the last twenty years, to the point that there is no distinctive local culture at all. I'd place Las Vegas, Phoenix, and Orlando highest on this measure nationally.
You think Vegas, with all its legalized gambling and prostitution is "generic"?
Phoenix has a lot of southwestern/Mexican elements to its culture. I'd bet "Day of the Dead", something most Pittsburghers have probably never heard of, is very popular there. Is that generic?
Orlando with its Disney/beach culture (I know it's inland, but it's not far from the beach) is generic?
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Old 10-20-2015, 10:08 PM
Status: "Bye Bye Warriors" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: where the good looking people are
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Sacramento area is generic in some ways, but for the most part is pretty unique in it's own way. It's complicated, lol.
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Old 10-21-2015, 03:59 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,553 times
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I thought it was about generic American culture, i.e. what do you picture when you hear "Anytown, USA".
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Old 10-21-2015, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,512,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kehkou View Post
I thought it was about generic American culture, i.e. what do you picture when you hear "Anytown, USA".
this is the most diverse country in the world. There is no generic American culture.
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Old 10-21-2015, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,797 posts, read 36,172,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blackgem View Post
I would put Dallas on this list also.
Definitely Dallas and definitely not Fort Worth!

Wasn't "Office Space" set and filmed in Dallas?
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