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Old 10-23-2015, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
2,377 posts, read 2,610,839 times
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I found the good/"best" neighborhoods in any major city never go less than $1.5k for a one bedroom. That is just the going rate in america atm.
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Old 10-23-2015, 02:12 PM
 
8,440 posts, read 11,178,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Many people talk about places like NYC, LA and Seattle being very expensive. Then, they go on to suggest that there are alternative, affordable "cool" millennial cities. I have not found that to be the case, really.

Austin TX, Charlotte NC, and Columbus OH are often cited as affordable and "cool" places for millennials to live in. However, there is one dynamic that I have become very aware of. That is, that the only areas within these cities/metros that are actually considered "cool," almost always happen to be in the central urban core (i.e. downtown, uptown, etc.), covering no more than a few square miles. If you live more than 5 miles outside of the central urban core, it's considered not "cool." Furthermore, the rents in these central urban cores, EVEN in "affordable" places like Columbus or Charlotte, are NOT affordable at all, unless you have roommates or make a very high income. For example, in downtown Columbus, a decent 1 bd apartment goes for a minimum of $1,300 or even as high as $1,700, which is too expensive considering one would be earning an Ohio salary, which isn't particularly high.

Now, I live in the city of Columbus, about 9 miles from downtown and really like the area. It's quiet, and I have a very nice 2 br condo for just $989 a month (1,000 sq ft).

Austin, TX is no longer considered affordable, by any means. A decent 1 bd apartment goes for at least $1,500 in the inner city, which is outrageous. Same with Charlotte....at least $1,400.

So then, why do millennials and Forbes keep suggesting that these cities are the best cities for millennials and that they are affordable? It's total baloney. To have the true urban, millennial experience, you must live in or near the central urban core, and pay very high rent. And those who live in the central urban core typically have no interest in venturing out to the outer parts of the city and making friends and doing activities there. It's like they want to live their whole lives in a 4-square mile BUBBLE!

Not to mention, many of these new apartment buildings are atrociously built. You can hear EVERYTHING through the walls and ceilings.

This whole millennial/urban living movement has got to be the biggest sham in American history, with regard to housing.

Smh.
Smh,

Thanks for a really interesting post. I don't know the answers to your questions, except to write, Millennial demos are a very important factor to professionals who do Urban Redevelopment or Development. I can list probably six - 10 different ways Millennial are different than Gen Xers or Baby Boomers. Cities are trying to develop the *cool* vibe you mention. My source is a consulting firm in *Cool Portland, OR* which absolutely has a vibe downtown.

Unless extra material is used to better buffer sound between apartments, they are like most others. However, I think the newest apartments are potentially worse as developers are often building the slightly smaller than before. That, based on the recommendations of Consultants and other Urban planners.

Your perspective that *millennial/urban living movement has got to be the biggest sham* is very interesting. Do your friends and peers feel the same? What would you be willing to give up and still have an city be *cool*? Maybe enough of true millennial/urban development has been done. Maybe it is time to listen to what keeps an area cool but better meets needs.

I look forward to your response with two - four suggestions of what you'd like changed and what you are willing to give up in return.

MSR
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Old 10-23-2015, 04:05 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,135 posts, read 4,165,633 times
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You have to pay to be in the "cool" cities. Living somewhere like Portland, Seattle, or San Francisco has a prestige to it that you pay for. Of course, the amenities available in these places are far above and beyond what you find in lower tiered cities. You could live somewhere like OKC, which actually does have young, walkable areas, but this place has an image issue that detracts from the "cool" factor. The rents (and wages) reflect that. Even here, rents are starting to get ridiculous ($1100+ for 1 br). Places like Columbus and Charlotte are a nice middle ground. It's still expensive if you want to live in the urban core, but cheaper than Portland, Seattle, or Austin. Their urban cores are large enough where you can have the urban/millennial experience but on a smaller scale than in the sexy cities.

I also don't blame urban millennials are living most of their lives within a 4 sq mile bubble. Charlotte is very conservative and family oriented outside of its urban core. OKC is even moreso. If people aren't married with kids and don't want to live the suburban Republican life they have little reason to spend much time in the suburbs of these smaller cities.

Bottom line, if you are willing to let go of stereotypes and what is "cool", most cities with a metro population of 1 million or higher will offer some sort of trendy, urban living. It may not be on the level of Austin or Portland but it's there, and its usually at a much more affordable cost allowing you to enjoy more of what the place does offer.
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Old 10-23-2015, 04:49 PM
 
29,973 posts, read 27,489,279 times
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Think Millennials Prefer The City? Think Again. | FiveThirtyEight

More millennials are changing their minds about the suburbs - Business Insider

Young Americans: Yearning for the Suburbs, Stuck in the City - The Atlantic
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Old 10-23-2015, 04:57 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,135 posts, read 4,165,633 times
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I think there is definitely a divide between millennials who get married and have kids and those who don't. Single millennials without kids are far more likely to prefer urban areas. Once kids are in the picture, you have to start thinking about things like schools, safety, and space to play outside so its understandable they would gravitate towards the suburbs. Schools is the biggest thing as most of the nation's urban school districts are inferior to the better-funded suburban ones.

The question of whether more millennials prefer the suburbs vs the city is only a part of the picture. 30 years ago, pretty much everyone went to the suburbs by default in all but a few major metropolitan areas. The only people who lived in the urban core were people who couldn't afford anything better. Today, the urban core is becoming a revitalized place in many cities nationwide. It's a place people want to live and not a place people end up trapped in. If just 1/3 of millennials prefer the urban core and stay there, that means there is plenty of demand for further urban revitalization.
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Old 10-23-2015, 05:00 PM
 
1,376 posts, read 1,010,929 times
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US cities are too expensive right now--best to go to an cheaper international city like Paris or Tokyo. Just bring lots of US currency!
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Old 10-23-2015, 06:15 PM
 
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I thought Tokyo as the most expensive city in the world.
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:05 PM
 
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$1500 or $1600 for a 1 bedroom even if it's not right in the city is still extremely cheap. Not a bad deal.
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,159,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
$1500 or $1600 for a 1 bedroom even if it's not right in the city is still extremely cheap. Not a bad deal.
You've gotta be kidding me. $1,500 is expensive, even for a 2 bedroom, especially not being right in the city.
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:12 PM
 
56,840 posts, read 81,169,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
I think there is definitely a divide between millennials who get married and have kids and those who don't. Single millennials without kids are far more likely to prefer urban areas. Once kids are in the picture, you have to start thinking about things like schools, safety, and space to play outside so its understandable they would gravitate towards the suburbs. Schools is the biggest thing as most of the nation's urban school districts are inferior to the better-funded suburban ones.

The question of whether more millennials prefer the suburbs vs the city is only a part of the picture. 30 years ago, pretty much everyone went to the suburbs by default in all but a few major metropolitan areas. The only people who lived in the urban core were people who couldn't afford anything better. Today, the urban core is becoming a revitalized place in many cities nationwide. It's a place people want to live and not a place people end up trapped in. If just 1/3 of millennials prefer the urban core and stay there, that means there is plenty of demand for further urban revitalization.
Also, urban school districts are incentivizing in regards to keeping families within the city. For instance, Kalamazoo has the Kalamazoo Promise. Syracuse and Buffalo have Say Yes to Education. Both programs offer scholarships for kids that graduate from those school districts to a select group of colleges and there is some other criteria. So, cities are using such programs in order to keep families within city limits. https://www.kalamazoopromise.com

Home - Say Yes to Education
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