U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-24-2015, 11:54 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,674,215 times
Reputation: 1838

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by rigizug View Post
I don't know, in the "old" days people moved where the best job opportunities for them were. Forget what's hip and focus on your career. Wherever you go there you are.
But nowadays with larger companies people are given multiple options for places to work their job, so they want to make the decision they will be happiest with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-25-2015, 09:40 AM
 
1,701 posts, read 1,364,811 times
Reputation: 1743
Quote:
Originally Posted by rigizug View Post
I don't know, in the "old" days people moved where the best job opportunities for them were. Forget what's hip and focus on your career. Wherever you go there you are.
It's still like that. Which is why certain places continue to attract a huge percentage of recent graduates, typically places with robust job markets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2015, 11:26 AM
 
1,577 posts, read 2,201,059 times
Reputation: 2761
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
It's still like that. Which is why certain places continue to attract a huge percentage of recent graduates, typically places with robust job markets.
The OP appears more concerned with a cool place to live but the housing is too expensive for him. Make some sacrifices, i.e. renting a room or taking in roommates or living outside of the urban areas and make the longer commute until he gains experience and can command a higher salary with time. That's how we older folks did it. You can't have it all in the beginning. I started out in a high cost area (Los Angeles) back in the early 1980s and had to rent a room providing housework in exchange for reduced rent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2015, 02:16 PM
 
1,701 posts, read 1,364,811 times
Reputation: 1743
Quote:
Originally Posted by rigizug View Post
The OP appears more concerned with a cool place to live but the housing is too expensive for him. Make some sacrifices, i.e. renting a room or taking in roommates or living outside of the urban areas and make the longer commute until he gains experience and can command a higher salary with time. That's how we older folks did it. You can't have it all in the beginning. I started out in a high cost area (Los Angeles) back in the early 1980s and had to rent a room providing housework in exchange for reduced rent.
Agreed.

I live in the DC area and that's how pretty much everyone I know has done it. That's the best way to get ahead.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2015, 02:59 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,481 posts, read 2,224,479 times
Reputation: 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Many people talk about places like NYC, LA and Seattle being very expensive. Then, they go on to suggest that there are alternative, affordable "cool" millennial cities. I have not found that to be the case, really.

Austin TX, Charlotte NC, and Columbus OH are often cited as affordable and "cool" places for millennials to live in. However, there is one dynamic that I have become very aware of. That is, that the only areas within these cities/metros that are actually considered "cool," almost always happen to be in the central urban core (i.e. downtown, uptown, etc.), covering no more than a few square miles. If you live more than 5 miles outside of the central urban core, it's considered not "cool." Furthermore, the rents in these central urban cores, EVEN in "affordable" places like Columbus or Charlotte, are NOT affordable at all, unless you have roommates or make a very high income. For example, in downtown Columbus, a decent 1 bd apartment goes for a minimum of $1,300 or even as high as $1,700, which is too expensive considering one would be earning an Ohio salary, which isn't particularly high.

Now, I live in the city of Columbus, about 9 miles from downtown and really like the area. It's quiet, and I have a very nice 2 br condo for just $989 a month (1,000 sq ft).

Austin, TX is no longer considered affordable, by any means. A decent 1 bd apartment goes for at least $1,500 in the inner city, which is outrageous. Same with Charlotte....at least $1,400.

So then, why do millennials and Forbes keep suggesting that these cities are the best cities for millennials and that they are affordable? It's total baloney. To have the true urban, millennial experience, you must live in or near the central urban core, and pay very high rent. And those who live in the central urban core typically have no interest in venturing out to the outer parts of the city and making friends and doing activities there. It's like they want to live their whole lives in a 4-square mile BUBBLE!

Not to mention, many of these new apartment buildings are atrociously built. You can hear EVERYTHING through the walls and ceilings.

This whole millennial/urban living movement has got to be the biggest sham in American history, with regard to housing.


Smh.
1) Those certainly aren't the prices everywhere, and, even if they are like that in Austin and Charlotte, there's other places to live. I live in a popular neighborhood in Chicago, and I certainly don't pay that much. Hell, last year I lived in a high rise on the lake in a two-bedroom for $1550 total.

2) That depends entirely on the city you're in. Lots of the older, more established cities have plenty of older buildings. My current apartment building was constructed in the 20s, for example.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2015, 11:06 PM
 
121 posts, read 120,421 times
Reputation: 173
Detroit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2015, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,658,574 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by livedeverywhere123 View Post
Simple answer- because the people writing the articles don't do any real research and have no idea what's actually going on. Most of the articles online are written to make money. If you really wanna find out the true millennial cities, your best bet is visiting them and reading forums like CD.
A big amen to that. If you write it/hype it, the sheeple will come. Social Media has made suckers out of so many Millennials who have lost the ability to think or observe for themselves.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2015, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,119,247 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
Agreed.

I live in the DC area and that's how pretty much everyone I know has done it. That's the best way to get ahead.
I'm 31 now. I ain't living with roommates.

In my opinion, if someone has to live with roommates in order to survive, that's pathetic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2015, 07:21 PM
 
1,701 posts, read 1,364,811 times
Reputation: 1743
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I'm 31 now. I ain't living with roommates.

In my opinion, if someone has to live with roommates in order to survive, that's pathetic.
Different strokes.

For me, it's totally worth it because I know career-wise I'll be making double what I'm making now in a few years and I'll be able to essentially do the things I want to do.

I wouldn't say it's pathetic though? Different things work for different people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2015, 08:59 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
8,965 posts, read 4,107,118 times
Reputation: 7661
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
Different strokes.

For me, it's totally worth it because I know career-wise I'll be making double what I'm making now in a few years and I'll be able to essentially do the things I want to do.

I wouldn't say it's pathetic though? Different things work for different people.
I agree. If you want to live in one of the millennial hotspots and don't want to break the bank its almost required, especially if you want to live in one of the desirable areas and not out in the suburbs. It's all about what is important to you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top