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Old 10-27-2015, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,116,699 times
Reputation: 7075

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
I agree. If you want to live in one of the millennial hotspots and don't want to break the bank its almost required, especially if you want to live in one of the desirable areas and not out in the suburbs. It's all about what is important to you.
I'd much, much rather live alone in the suburbs than live in the city with roommates. I'd go insane if I had to live with someone else. Roommates suck.
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:17 AM
 
1,376 posts, read 1,007,344 times
Reputation: 1453
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
A big amen to that. If you write it/hype it, the sheeple will come. Social Media has made suckers out of so many Millennials who have lost the ability to think or observe for themselves.
Yes, it reminds me of the old Millennial songs "If You're Going To San Francisco" and "California Dreaming", that inspired so many Millennials to move out west to the California coast.
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,511,307 times
Reputation: 1861
All cities are getting expensive because melinnials are the first generation since prior to WWII that actually want to live in cities. It seems like everyone in past generations wanted to live as far away as they could with big lots of land and big houses. I don't know any melinnial that is desiring a place like that. I mean, we all want a big house, but melinnials won't trade it for the inconvenience of living far away from things to do.
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Old 10-27-2015, 12:13 PM
 
1,579 posts, read 2,200,276 times
Reputation: 2756
Try Kansas City if you want urban living. Though it's getting expensive too you can still find deals for just under $1000 if you look hard enough. However, you may have to drive to the suburbs for work
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Old 10-27-2015, 12:22 PM
 
9,622 posts, read 5,941,877 times
Reputation: 6540
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
So then, why do millennials and Forbes keep suggesting that these cities are the best cities for millennials and that they are affordable? It's total baloney.

Because Forbes writers live in a city where the rent easily doubles those in your hip urban core. When someone is accustomed to seeing $3,500 for a tiny one bedroom, $1,500 for a better product in a different city naturally looks like bargains.

.
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Old 10-27-2015, 12:32 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 6,111,171 times
Reputation: 5829
I thought Austin and Seattle were played out and that Pittsburgh and Detroit were the new hot spots for the cool kids.
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Old 10-27-2015, 12:54 PM
Status: "Bye Bye Warriors" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,558 posts, read 2,580,894 times
Reputation: 2978
Even suburbs are trying to brand their urban cores. Commuter burbs with heavy rail going through their downtowns are becoming more coveted than suburbs near freeways with a main street.

The good thing for me is I live in downtown San Jose. Not considered cool by people in the bay area or anyplace else.
The average rent in San Jose is actually not only cheaper than SF but cheaper than OAKLAND now. Some how I got lucky and now live in a prohibition era building, with low rent (relative to the bay area), and a nice gritty feel.

Best part? No hipster/yuppie dufus. Mostly Asian and Latino, a mix of college kids and working class. A few white students, some professionals of all races, some random black folks that seem friendly. Having lived in Sacramento and San Jose, I have found not being near SF has it's benefits. That's the thing. You have to find the places that are not hip to enjoy a relatively reasonably priced urban experience.
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Old 10-27-2015, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,655,251 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInPortland View Post
Yes, it reminds me of the old Millennial songs "If You're Going To San Francisco" and "California Dreaming", that inspired so many Millennials to move out west to the California coast.
Oh there were sheeple then too. But many realized when the dream was over. Did you ever listen to the words of "California Dreaming?" It talks about regrets of someone who moved for the dream and realized it was false.
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Old 10-27-2015, 03:54 PM
 
1,376 posts, read 1,007,344 times
Reputation: 1453
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Oh there were sheeple then too. But many realized when the dream was over. Did you ever listen to the words of "California Dreaming?" It talks about regrets of someone who moved for the dream and realized it was false.
So anyone who moves to a "popular" city(which includes everywhere from San Francisco and Portland to Denver and Houston right now) is being a "sheeple"?

There's always been a more mobile segment of the population that wants to move to New York or LA or San Francisco or so on--just because they're arguably a little more exciting to live in if you like urban environments. There's just more people these days--the population grows, but no one is building new cities like the ones of the past, so the market gets more expensive and crowded to do so with higher demand. So then demand filters down to the second-tier cities or third tier cities and then as money flows into their core neighborhoods, things get pricey. But it's just like people pay extra to live near the mountains or near beaches--people like living near "stuff". People go, why not move to this new place, it's cheaper and less BS here--then enough people do, and they complain that everyone moved there...

Also though a lot of real estate increases in a lot of places are actually driven by richer baby boomers still, since more so than Milleninials or much of Gen X, they actually have the equity to buy the pricey places.
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Old 10-27-2015, 04:53 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 11,431,560 times
Reputation: 12307
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Did you ever listen to the words of "California Dreaming?" It talks about regrets of someone who moved for the dream and realized it was false.
Wrong! It's about someone who moved away from California to a cold climate, and with winter coming, is dreaming about being back in California. It was written by John Phillips who was with his California wife Michelle living in New York.
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