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Old 10-27-2015, 06:17 PM
 
5,694 posts, read 8,766,777 times
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Quote:
All cities are getting expensive
I don't understand your comment, Happiness. I thought the point of this thread was that non-trendy cities can be affordable. Are you speaking only of the largest cities or only of housing in the CBD with high cost due to new construction, elevators, sprinklers, structured parking etc.
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Old 10-27-2015, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,592 posts, read 17,589,896 times
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If you must be that close to DT for prestige reasons or whatever, expect to pay through the reasons. Live half an hour out and your costs go down drastically.
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Old 10-27-2015, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,513,232 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
If you must be that close to DT for prestige reasons or whatever, expect to pay through the reasons. Live half an hour out and your costs go down drastically.
It used to be desirable to live 30 minutes out. Boomers and Xers wanted to be as far as they could. Millennials hate that far out. Most of us would be even live in a bad neighborhood to stay close to town. I always plan to live clos to the city, even if kids are in my future. Since millennials do that rent prices closed to town will go up.
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Old 10-27-2015, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,105 posts, read 13,496,767 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztonyg View Post
I've noticed that when millennials (and I'm one of them) decide to start families. Most, if not all, move from the "trendy" and "urban" place to the suburbs.

I have a friend who isn't looking to settle down and he is appalled to do anything outside of the urban core in "trendy" cities, however.
This likely has to do with issues of affordability rather than desire. Meaning that Millennials can afford to live where they want without kids, but if/when they have them, they have to sacrifice and move elsewhere. This may be somewhat different than previous generations which mostly saw the suburbs as the desirable location regardless of affordability.
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Old 10-27-2015, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,105 posts, read 13,496,767 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
Millennials vote for liberals and then are surprised by the consequences of liberal policies. Amazing.
What? This is purely about supply and demand. If a place is desirable, demand to be there will increase. This is neither liberal nor conservative. I have no idea what you're talking about.
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Old 10-27-2015, 10:41 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,675,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
It used to be desirable to live 30 minutes out. Boomers and Xers wanted to be as far as they could. Millennials hate that far out. Most of us would be even live in a bad neighborhood to stay close to town. I always plan to live clos to the city, even if kids are in my future. Since millennials do that rent prices closed to town will go up.
As to why Millenials like living closer, I'd like to provide an anecdote for a possible reason. Driving is, quite simply, a pain in the ass. Even cruising through an empty freeway is boring as hell; with traffic it just sucks. Cars have finally lost their novelty after 3 generations and they're not all that to us (or at least to me). Anyone else feel this way?
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Old 10-28-2015, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,513,232 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
As to why Millenials like living closer, I'd like to provide an anecdote for a possible reason. Driving is, quite simply, a pain in the ass. Even cruising through an empty freeway is boring as hell; with traffic it just sucks. Cars have finally lost their novelty after 3 generations and they're not all that to us (or at least to me). Anyone else feel this way?
I love my Mazda. I have had it for 4 years and will prob drive that thing until it can't go any further (it is a 2012). It is cute, safe, and gas efficient. My parents couldn't imagine life without two huge trucks and massive monthly payments. I couldnt imagine life with those things!!

And driving is a pain. I live 12 min from my current job. I once had a job that was 45 minutes away and getting in the car everyday to drive was a pain in the ass.
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Old 10-28-2015, 09:10 AM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,035 posts, read 4,123,391 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
If you must be that close to DT for prestige reasons or whatever, expect to pay through the reasons. Live half an hour out and your costs go down drastically.
It isn't really for prestige reasons. It's to live in a walkable, social environment. Suburbs are about privacy and raising families. For a young, single person, living in suburbia can be a very boring, isolating experience.
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Old 10-28-2015, 09:14 AM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,035 posts, read 4,123,391 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
I love my Mazda. I have had it for 4 years and will prob drive that thing until it can't go any further (it is a 2012). It is cute, safe, and gas efficient. My parents couldn't imagine life without two huge trucks and massive monthly payments. I couldnt imagine life with those things!!
I fell into that trap my first half decade out of college and am still up to my neck in debt. I've since realized that new cars are perhaps the worst financial investment a person can make.
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Old 10-28-2015, 09:22 AM
 
4,668 posts, read 6,117,377 times
Reputation: 5840
It's nowhere near just the millenials that want to live 'downtown'. If it were they'd be able to pick and choose the apts they want, the way those of us in gen x were able to.

Living downtown has become popular among empty nester baby boomers. And has always been somewhat popular among gen x, and even more so in the last 10 yrs or so.
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