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Old 10-28-2015, 10:15 AM
 
1,376 posts, read 1,007,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
It used to be desirable to live 30 minutes out. Boomers and Xers wanted to be as far as they could. Millennials hate that far out. Most of us would be even live in a bad neighborhood to stay close to town. I always plan to live clos to the city, even if kids are in my future. Since millennials do that rent prices closed to town will go up.
30 minutes isn't really that far a distance in terms of travel time these days in big cities and metros. Maybe 30 miles seems far, but in big cities and with frequent traffic or the time it takes to get around on public transit, it can be 30 minutes to get from an inner neighborhood to downtown(to just get around Manhattan going north to south is often 30 minutes). Even in smaller cities and metros, 30 minutes travel time from downtown can still put you solidly inside the city limits in an older street car suburb neighborhood(though a drive that can take you 15 minutes with no traffic, might take 30 to 40 minutes during rush hour).

And it's not just Millennials buying or renting close-in these days.

Last edited by CanuckInPortland; 10-28-2015 at 10:23 AM..
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Old 10-28-2015, 10:22 AM
 
1,376 posts, read 1,007,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dport7674 View Post
It's nowhere near just the millenials that want to live 'downtown'. If it were they'd be able to pick and choose the apts they want, the way those of us in gen x were able to.

Living downtown has become popular among empty nester baby boomers. And has always been somewhat popular among gen x, and even more so in the last 10 yrs or so.
Exactly--looking at who is buying the condos in the expensive neighborhoods adjacent to downtown in West Coast cities--it's often Gen X professional couples or wealthier retired boomers. The Millennials are the ones getting squeezed by rent increases more than other generations with equity built up--but at the same time there's increased population and demand for living close-in right now.
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Old 10-28-2015, 10:27 AM
 
Location: USA
6,226 posts, read 5,359,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
It isn't really for prestige reasons. It's to live in a walkable, social environment. Suburbs are about privacy and raising families. For a young, single person, living in suburbia can be a very boring, isolating experience.
I'm in the millennial generation and have lived in the suburbs all my life. But then again I'm not the most social person, so I don't really need bars or clubs or any of that. Personally, it's my belief that boredom due to geographical location just shows the person lacks creativity. I might live in "boring suburbia" but I have so many things to do I'll never do it all in one lifetime.
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Old 10-28-2015, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,661,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInPortland View Post
So anyone who moves to a "popular" city(which includes everywhere from San Francisco and Portland to Denver and Houston right now) is being a "sheeple"?

There's always been a more mobile segment of the population that wants to move to New York or LA or San Francisco or so on--just because they're arguably a little more exciting to live in if you like urban environments. There's just more people these days--the population grows, but no one is building new cities like the ones of the past, so the market gets more expensive and crowded to do so with higher demand. So then demand filters down to the second-tier cities or third tier cities and then as money flows into their core neighborhoods, things get pricey. But it's just like people pay extra to live near the mountains or near beaches--people like living near "stuff". People go, why not move to this new place, it's cheaper and less BS here--then enough people do, and they complain that everyone moved there...

Also though a lot of real estate increases in a lot of places are actually driven by richer baby boomers still, since more so than Milleninials or much of Gen X, they actually have the equity to buy the pricey places.
Nope, I didn't say everyone. I was referring to those who don't do their homework, land in a place they have only heard about and wind up being in an over-hyped area that isn't what they had expected because they had relied upon hearsay rather than actual observation.

My point was, too many people depend upon what they hear instead of what they actually research for themselves. You can see that firsthand by those who post on the forums of the more popular cities who state they are moving to those cities and ask questions they should be asking before making the decision. Their questions are obviously based on assumptions made upon erroneous information they have read on Social Media or seen TV shows and are often totally distorted or just plain wrong.
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Old 10-28-2015, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,661,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
Wrong! It's about someone who moved away from California to a cold climate, and with winter coming, is dreaming about being back in California. It was written by John Phillips who was with his California wife Michelle living in New York.
Then I stand corrected but I had always heard it was the way I had interpreted it.
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Old 10-28-2015, 01:50 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 11,437,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Then I stand corrected but I had always heard it was the way I had interpreted it.
No problem. Here's the story:

In a 2002 interview with National Public Radio (NPR), Michelle Phillips explained how this song came about. It was 1963, and she was newly married to John Phillips. They were living in New York City, which was having a particularly cold winter, at least by Michelle's standards as she was from sunny California. John would walk around the apartment at night working out tunes, and one morning brought the first verse of the song to Michelle. It was a song about longing to be in another place, and it was inspired by Michelle's homesickness.

NPR : California Dreamin', Present at the Creation
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Old 10-28-2015, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,121,705 times
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I disagree that driving a car is a pain. I LOVE driving a car everywhere for everything, all the time. I hate walking around for everything or using buses, etc. Driving a car is much more comfortable, private, convenient and in most cases, quicker.

As a millennial myself, I have lived in both extreme urban settings (midtown Manhattan) and semi-rural settings (suburbs in CT). Overall, I prefer something in between. I couldn't care less for bars and clubs, as they bore me to death. There's no "point" to them.

Right now I live in the city of Columbus, OH, just 9 miles from downtown and I like it. It's easy going, quiet, and there's sort of a blend of families and single/young people. I personally do not like living in an area where EVERYONE is just like me, young and single. It's not representative of the real world at large. I like to be around both singles and families, otherwise it feels like I'm living in a dormitory lifestyle.

Even being 9 miles from downtown Columbus, I rarely, if ever go downtown. I just have no reason to go there.
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Old 10-28-2015, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,579 posts, read 17,561,360 times
Reputation: 27660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
It used to be desirable to live 30 minutes out. Boomers and Xers wanted to be as far as they could. Millennials hate that far out. Most of us would be even live in a bad neighborhood to stay close to town. I always plan to live clos to the city, even if kids are in my future. Since millennials do that rent prices closed to town will go up.
I wouldn't want to be in the city core of Indianapolis - it's a war zone
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Old 10-28-2015, 05:42 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,479 posts, read 2,225,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I disagree that driving a car is a pain. I LOVE driving a car everywhere for everything, all the time. I hate walking around for everything or using buses, etc. Driving a car is much more comfortable, private, convenient and in most cases, quicker.

As a millennial myself, I have lived in both extreme urban settings (midtown Manhattan) and semi-rural settings (suburbs in CT). Overall, I prefer something in between. I couldn't care less for bars and clubs, as they bore me to death. There's no "point" to them.

Right now I live in the city of Columbus, OH, just 9 miles from downtown and I like it. It's easy going, quiet, and there's sort of a blend of families and single/young people. I personally do not like living in an area where EVERYONE is just like me, young and single. It's not representative of the real world at large. I like to be around both singles and families, otherwise it feels like I'm living in a dormitory lifestyle.

Even being 9 miles from downtown Columbus, I rarely, if ever go downtown. I just have no reason to go there.
So then you would probably agree that most "general Millennial" articles aren't going to apply to you.
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Old 10-28-2015, 06:45 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,004 posts, read 4,111,791 times
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In regards to millennials and suburbia, the little talked about fact is that not all millennials are wanting hip, urban environments. There are many that dream of following the boomers into a single family home in the suburbs and raise a family. With that said, a significant amount do want dense, walkable, and urban, which is a huge uptick from previous generations which had virtually no interest in such a lifestyle.
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