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Old 10-23-2015, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
Reputation: 7075

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Many people talk about places like NYC, LA and Seattle being very expensive. Then, they go on to suggest that there are alternative, affordable "cool" millennial cities. I have not found that to be the case, really.

Austin TX, Charlotte NC, and Columbus OH are often cited as affordable and "cool" places for millennials to live in. However, there is one dynamic that I have become very aware of. That is, that the only areas within these cities/metros that are actually considered "cool," almost always happen to be in the central urban core (i.e. downtown, uptown, etc.), covering no more than a few square miles. If you live more than 5 miles outside of the central urban core, it's considered not "cool." Furthermore, the rents in these central urban cores, EVEN in "affordable" places like Columbus or Charlotte, are NOT affordable at all, unless you have roommates or make a very high income. For example, in downtown Columbus, a decent 1 bd apartment goes for a minimum of $1,300 or even as high as $1,700, which is too expensive considering one would be earning an Ohio salary, which isn't particularly high.

Now, I live in the city of Columbus, about 9 miles from downtown and really like the area. It's quiet, and I have a very nice 2 br condo for just $989 a month (1,000 sq ft).

Austin, TX is no longer considered affordable, by any means. A decent 1 bd apartment goes for at least $1,500 in the inner city, which is outrageous. Same with Charlotte....at least $1,400.

So then, why do millennials and Forbes keep suggesting that these cities are the best cities for millennials and that they are affordable? It's total baloney. To have the true urban, millennial experience, you must live in or near the central urban core, and pay very high rent. And those who live in the central urban core typically have no interest in venturing out to the outer parts of the city and making friends and doing activities there. It's like they want to live their whole lives in a 4-square mile BUBBLE!

Not to mention, many of these new apartment buildings are atrociously built. You can hear EVERYTHING through the walls and ceilings.

This whole millennial/urban living movement has got to be the biggest sham in American history, with regard to housing.

Smh.
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Old 10-23-2015, 09:47 AM
 
84 posts, read 105,484 times
Reputation: 165
Simple answer- because the people writing the articles don't do any real research and have no idea what's actually going on. Most of the articles online are written to make money. If you really wanna find out the true millennial cities, your best bet is visiting them and reading forums like CD.

Last edited by livedeverywhere123; 10-23-2015 at 10:01 AM..
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Old 10-23-2015, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,391,718 times
Reputation: 8050
Stop worrying about what you think others think is "cool" and do what is best for you.

I don't think Forbes is really in touch with young people.
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Old 10-23-2015, 09:57 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,259 posts, read 19,555,335 times
Reputation: 13033
You get what you pay for.

Life is like that, usually.
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Old 10-23-2015, 11:19 AM
 
56,660 posts, read 80,952,685 times
Reputation: 12521
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Stop worrying about what you think others think is "cool" and do what is best for you.

I don't think Forbes is really in touch with young people.
This......What is interesting with most cities of at least 100,000 is that there are areas that trendy, but you can find an area with similar attributes that is more underrated or isn't thought of as much. So, I think if a person does their research, you can find other options in most of these cities/areas that fit a lot of the attributes said folks are looking for. It may be a matter of a critical mass, but still.....
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Old 10-23-2015, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Peoria, AZ
952 posts, read 1,078,923 times
Reputation: 1030
I live in the Phoenix, AZ area.

This area isn't viewed as "cool" and "trendy" by a lot of "experts" and even a lot of posters on this site. However, it does have about 99% of the amenities that the "cool" and "trendy" places have for a fraction of the costs.

Plus, the older I get, the less I enjoy going out to bars and spending $20 for 2 drinks; living with roommates; living in apartments; etc.
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Old 10-23-2015, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Peoria, AZ
952 posts, read 1,078,923 times
Reputation: 1030
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
This whole millennial/urban living movement has got to be the biggest sham in American history, with regard to housing.
Smh.
I've noticed that when millennials (and I'm one of them) decide to start families. Most, if not all, move from the "trendy" and "urban" place to the suburbs.

I have a friend who isn't looking to settle down and he is appalled to do anything outside of the urban core in "trendy" cities, however.
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Old 10-23-2015, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztonyg View Post
I live in the Phoenix, AZ area.

This area isn't viewed as "cool" and "trendy" by a lot of "experts" and even a lot of posters on this site. However, it does have about 99% of the amenities that the "cool" and "trendy" places have for a fraction of the costs.

Plus, the older I get, the less I enjoy going out to bars and spending $20 for 2 drinks; living with roommates; living in apartments; etc.
The Phoenix, AZ metro area is no longer considered cheap. Median home values and rents are higher than the national median now.
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Old 10-23-2015, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,868 posts, read 6,197,101 times
Reputation: 6172
Maybe millennials need to decide that something else is "cool".
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Old 10-23-2015, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Liminal Space
1,018 posts, read 1,235,532 times
Reputation: 1294
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Many people talk about places like NYC, LA and Seattle being very expensive. Then, they go on to suggest that there are alternative, affordable "cool" millennial cities. I have not found that to be the case, really.

Austin TX, Charlotte NC, and Columbus OH are often cited as affordable and "cool" places for millennials to live in. However, there is one dynamic that I have become very aware of. That is, that the only areas within these cities/metros that are actually considered "cool," almost always happen to be in the central urban core (i.e. downtown, uptown, etc.), covering no more than a few square miles. If you live more than 5 miles outside of the central urban core, it's considered not "cool." Furthermore, the rents in these central urban cores, EVEN in "affordable" places like Columbus or Charlotte, are NOT affordable at all, unless you have roommates or make a very high income. For example, in downtown Columbus, a decent 1 bd apartment goes for a minimum of $1,300 or even as high as $1,700, which is too expensive considering one would be earning an Ohio salary, which isn't particularly high.

Now, I live in the city of Columbus, about 9 miles from downtown and really like the area. It's quiet, and I have a very nice 2 br condo for just $989 a month (1,000 sq ft).


Austin, TX is no longer considered affordable, by any means. A decent 1 bd apartment goes for at least $1,500 in the inner city, which is outrageous. Same with Charlotte....at least $1,400.

So then, why do millennials and Forbes keep suggesting that these cities are the best cities for millennials and that they are affordable? It's total baloney. To have the true urban, millennial experience, you must live in or near the central urban core, and pay very high rent. And those who live in the central urban core typically have no interest in venturing out to the outer parts of the city and making friends and doing activities there. It's like they want to live their whole lives in a 4-square mile BUBBLE!

Not to mention, many of these new apartment buildings are atrociously built. You can hear EVERYTHING through the walls and ceilings.

This whole millennial/urban living movement has got to be the biggest sham in American history, with regard to housing.

Smh.
So you are happy with where you live, but are worried that it isn't "cool" enough? I'm trying to figure out what exactly is your problem here.
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