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Old 10-29-2015, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,565 posts, read 746,690 times
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If "performance" is referring to population growth, then in general Texas and the Atlantic Coast states are doing better than the other portions of the South - although Tennessee's growth rate is relatively high as well.

As other posters have stated, much of the difference comes down to the degree of urbanization, as well as the presence of attractive amenities like the mountains or coastline. But I don't think any state should be characterized as good or bad on the basis of population growth alone. Parts of Florida attract a large volume of retirees but have a very weak job market. While Arkansas has some badly depressed areas in the east and south especially, the central part of the state around Little Rock and the northwest corner are both prosperous with low unemployment. So there is a lot of variation within each state.

I expect that growth in the South will continue over the long term, given the attraction of the warmer climate and lower cost of living to the rising share of senior citizens. The availability of jobs in the region's key metropolitan areas is another point in its favor.
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Old 10-29-2015, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,512,290 times
Reputation: 1861
Quote:
Originally Posted by StreetSmarts View Post
FL will grow from foreigners and older ppl escaping the northern winters.

NC will grow due to the scenery, perfect climate (as close as you can get) and jobs.
You need to get to moving there.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,791 posts, read 36,172,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
When you get into rural areas of the upper South (Appalachian especially), it feels like time has been frozen. I worked in southwest VA for a couple years, and worked there again for a bit in 2012. There were many coworkers still on well water and who had no broadband available.
But this is true in places like WV, PA, even upstate NY as well - and the Ozarks too for that matter. This is not exclusively a southern issue. It's more of a "mountain folk" issue.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,791 posts, read 36,172,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 16 Acres View Post
And what's wrong with Well Water?? lol

Actually our well produces high quality great tasting water.

But you forgot Outhouses, lol.

They are getting phased out, but I'm sure there are some Outhouses still in use here and there in the South.
Just as likely in Upper Appalachia, stretching up into PA, Ohio, WV, even upstate NY.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
6,854 posts, read 11,118,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Biggest reasons for Southern growth..

- milder winters, lots of beaches and mountains
- low taxes, more businesses locate there
- higher minority population (that's most of pop. growth)
- Many people find Southern culture (respect for traditions, friendliness, relaxed attitude) appealing

The South has problems. There are large gaps in income and health between affluent metros and poor rural areas. Public institutions (schools, parks, universities) are often worse. Most transplants to the South move to affluent areas, so the bad areas are out of sight & out of mind.
I would add lack of unions, longer working hours, lower benefits, and low pay to the reason that industry moves to the south and contributes to growth.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,099 posts, read 1,124,793 times
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Unions are terrible. We're okay with not having them.
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Old 10-30-2015, 07:21 AM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,566,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
I would add lack of unions, longer working hours, lower benefits, and low pay to the reason that industry moves to the south and contributes to growth.
If a CEO and executives wants warm weather and beaches and golfing I am sure that plays a role in a company's location plans if they want to hire the right people at the top. Growth prospects are alot better in the south as well. I was reading an article in the wall street journal about mercedes moving headquarters to atlanta and some of the reasons

"Easy access to well-maintained highways, rail lines, ports and airports."

“We think the infrastructure in the States has changed,” Daimler Chief Executive Dieter Zetsche said in an interview on Tuesday. “

The Georgia port in Brunswick is one of the nation’s leading importers of new automobiles.. Zetsche also pointed to the easier access to the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport which is the world’s busiest airport in terms of passengers."

One company just moved to myrtle beach this year from colorado because all of its employees are showing up to work stoned after colorado legalized pot. lol

Colo. company says pot pushed them out of state
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Old 10-30-2015, 11:23 AM
 
6,816 posts, read 6,950,655 times
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For Atlanta in particular, it was the airport and centralized location.
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Old 10-30-2015, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,321 posts, read 2,746,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Just as likely in Upper Appalachia, stretching up into PA, Ohio, WV, even upstate NY.
Hi Kathryn, just a point of info. WV is not part of northern Appalachia, it has never been considered such until recently and the political mapping by the Appalachian Regional Commission, which has south central Appalachia running up the side of WV, purely arbitrary.

This is the most commonly accepted map of the region, even John Alexander Williams' recent map of the region conforms to this older map (which is Public Domain) from the book "The Southern Highlander and His Homeland" by John Campbell, 1921

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Old 10-30-2015, 03:01 PM
 
Location: FLORIDA
8,964 posts, read 6,262,218 times
Reputation: 3380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
You need to get to moving there.

Sooner or later.
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