U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-01-2015, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,924,480 times
Reputation: 35201

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by anninkc View Post
Ha ha that's hilarious. I bet those Aussies had a blast with you. By the way, I love connecting flights through DFW, as those Texans are just soooo much nicer to deal with than anyone at LAX!
Oh, I agree! I have lived most of my life in northern California, and I find Los Angeles to be full of extremely rude people. Whenever I've gone there, I'm amazed at how rude the hotel and restaurant staff are, in particular - the people who are supposed to be treating you well!

I've also learned that the U.S. Customs officers are really grumpy compared to Mexico or Canada anyway. They're just flat-out mean. I was once in line after returning from Mexico and one of the officers was yelling at a Mexican woman who didn't speak English and he was yelling at her that she needed to follow the yellow line. Jerk. I translated. But, there was just no need to be like that, and unfortunately, that seems to be the norm at least in the U.S. customs areas I've been through. Whereas in Mexico or Canada, you're treated like a guest instead of an unwanted invader. And this was before 9-11!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-02-2015, 11:36 AM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,461,251 times
Reputation: 2855
Based on the OP, it seems you already are leaning heavily towards Seattle.

The relatively downside of Seattle vs. KC is cost of living, so it would help to know what financial ballpark you are in. I.e. a family of 4 can do pretty well in KC on 50k/year, but in Seattle that would be very tough.

If family income is 200k, then sure, you can easily enjoy most of what Seattle has to offer. The exact flexion point would depend precisely on your expectations (house/schools/commute).

If money is no object, I would choose Seattle every time. However, most of us are bound by some financial considerations, and KC offers quite a bit for the money. You can buy a nice house in a nice school district of a good suburb for on an actual median salary in KC with a 15-20 minute commute to most jobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2015, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Tropical Oz
42 posts, read 36,308 times
Reputation: 24
Yes, good points for sure. We did live in a good neighbourhood in KC on a single low budget before, and also appreciated the lack of traffic. My husband (understandably) hates traffic and will not drive in it to work. Fortunately our budget should surpass 200k, and would increase after a couple of years there. It's just hard to get any sort of vibe about a place when you're overseas and can't just pop over for the weekend with a family of 4. Don't want to move there and hate it! Mind you, I lived in a variety of places before I had kids (UK, Japan, and a coupla different cities each in Oz and the US) and generally make the best of what's available when I'm there. The only places that really didn't work for me so much were upstate NY and Perth, Oz (people very unfriendly). The stakes feel a lot higher, though, when you're considering a permanent move with children.

It would be so easy to slip back into a lifestyle in KC - still have friends there, too. Seattle no doubt has really a LOT to offer, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2015, 11:03 AM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,461,251 times
Reputation: 2855
Quote:
Originally Posted by anninkc View Post
It would be so easy to slip back into a lifestyle in KC - still have friends there, too. Seattle no doubt has really a LOT to offer, though.
Then I'd move to KC rather than starting over from scratch. You'll have plenty of spare $$ to visit Seattle when you feel like it.

And Seattle traffic really is bad. Even if he's not commuting by car you'd feel it whenever you needed to move around the I-5 corridor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2015, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,274,499 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by anninkc View Post
I found the 4-season weather a bit too extreme in KC. We don't care about sports (watching games) at all. Not religious. Found the 'Bush' lovers a bit much in KC. Like nature/walking (not snow).
Pick Seattle. It's mostly the reverse of this! I grew up in KC, and wouldn't care to move back there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2015, 03:22 PM
 
213 posts, read 195,533 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
It sounds like you'll enjoy Seattle.

Be prepared that KC is one of the friendliest, outgoing cities in the county--Seattle is one of the least. That could be a bit of a culture shock.

Yes, the people in Upstate New York aren't super friendly to strangers, but they're truly kind and willing to help anyone in need. I'm not sure if it's the same in Seattle.

Perhaps Atlanta or Philadelphia would be good options?
I live in Seattle and I've found that friendliness varies pretty significantly. In general, I'd say it best compares to a West Coast version of Minnesota nice. People are generally polite and superficially friendly, but they tend to have a bit of a barrier in terms of really being warm or chatty right up front. Within the trendy neighborhoods of inner Seattle, I find the Seattle freeze to be a real thing. A lot of hipsters and tech workers will do that (these neighborhoods were very different in the 70s and 80s, but that's a different story altogether). However, in some of the outer neighborhoods and in other cities in the metro I find people to be a lot friendlier and less uptight. Everett and Tacoma are both fairly blue collar and have a really different vibe in terms of how people act. Even within the city, South Seattle tends to be friendlier, more outgoing, and a lot less yuppie. Far North Seattle also is a bit friendlier.

Basically - the closer you get to the core, the more white-collar, hipster, less-friendly and freeze-ish it gets. But there are other cities in the region and even other parts of Seattle that do feel pretty friendly and a lot more outgoing. Remember, the region has a blue collar history with an economy that for many decades relied almost entirely on Boeing and maritime activities. You can definitely still feel that in more parts of the region than you'd expect.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2015, 03:23 PM
 
213 posts, read 195,533 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
Pick Seattle. It's mostly the reverse of this! I grew up in KC, and wouldn't care to move back there.
Seattleites actually do care about sports a lot - probably more than any other West Coast city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2015, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,510,289 times
Reputation: 2935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jhenma View Post
I live in Seattle and I've found that friendliness varies pretty significantly. In general, I'd say it best compares to a West Coast version of Minnesota nice. People are generally polite and superficially friendly, but they tend to have a bit of a barrier in terms of really being warm or chatty right up front. Within the trendy neighborhoods of inner Seattle, I find the Seattle freeze to be a real thing. A lot of hipsters and tech workers will do that (these neighborhoods were very different in the 70s and 80s, but that's a different story altogether). However, in some of the outer neighborhoods and in other cities in the metro I find people to be a lot friendlier and less uptight. Everett and Tacoma are both fairly blue collar and have a really different vibe in terms of how people act. Even within the city, South Seattle tends to be friendlier, more outgoing, and a lot less yuppie. Far North Seattle also is a bit friendlier.

Basically - the closer you get to the core, the more white-collar, hipster, less-friendly and freeze-ish it gets. But there are other cities in the region and even other parts of Seattle that do feel pretty friendly and a lot more outgoing. Remember, the region has a blue collar history with an economy that for many decades relied almost entirely on Boeing and maritime activities. You can definitely still feel that in more parts of the region than you'd expect.
For the most part, I agree with you. Culture and class intersect in lots of complex ways all over Washington State.

I think that in any major city you'll find a lot of really judgmental pricks on the wealthier end of the punk-hipster-yuppie continuum. Seattle just has more of them. But you'll see the same thing in Brooklyn's trendier neighborhood's, Wicker Park and Logan Square in Chicago, Echo Park/Silver Lake in Los Angeles, or the entire Bay Area (I hope folks are picking up on the sarcasm).

From my experience Kitsap County seemed like a cultural microcosm of White American culture as a whole. I've met detached passive-aggressive hipsters, evangelical Christians, rednecks, and suburban commuters.

I've met people in Eastern Washington that were just as outgoing and friendly as anyone you'd meet in Indiana or Missouri. I imagine, as you're saying, non-trendy parts of urban Western Washington might be the same.

I've met working-class Washingtonians that speak with the same accent I hear in Western Maryland or outside Pittsburgh.

In rural Washington, I've seen sensed a meth problem that rivals West Virginia.

In rural Washington, I've seen white poverty that rivals West Virginia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2015, 12:51 PM
 
886 posts, read 1,923,508 times
Reputation: 317
I love KC. The weather sucks, but 4 seasons are nice in my opinion.

I have never been to Seattle, but I love what I've seen in pictures, and I like that it has a mild climate. I'm just going to put what I think are pros of KC.

It's growing. Downtown is building up quickly, it has expanded a lot, and even more is going in. The streetcar system is opening up in March or April of 2016. More and more businesses keep opening there.

Cost of living. I've been all over the world.. San Francisco, NYC, London, Prague, etc... I love traveling. The cost of living in KC allows you to live really nice and still have a lot of money left over for traveling if it's your thing. It's easy to fly to the coast, it's easy to drive to Texas, Chicago, Denver, etc. Flights are fairly fast because of it's central location. Your money goes so much further here than many other places.

Art. It is an art city, from First Fridays, to the Nelson, the KCAI expos, Plaza Art fair, etc. Based on reviews on Yelp KC Art Institute ranked as the #1 Best Museum in the US. While not an art museum, The World War 1 museum ranked #5.

I work in IT, and I think there is a lot of new technology in KC, and a lot of startups moving to the city as well. Google Fiber is awesome and has brought about competition, so other places will be rolling out gigabit speeds soon.

The people are great. It's easy to just talk to anyone. No one is surprised when strangers talk to them over things, people make eye contact, smile, wave, etc. There are not a lot of other places I've been in the US where people are like that.

The bad side of KC in my opinion is how spread out it is, and the city is held back by politics between the KS and MO sides of the metro, with the KS side constantly trying to poach companies away from the MO side.

As someone who always wanted to move out of KC as a kid, once I got around to traveling a lot, I realized I really love this city. I'm not going to say I wouldn't move, cuz I may sometime, but there are always sacrifices and you just have to measure what means most to you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2015, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,567 posts, read 1,827,484 times
Reputation: 2672
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Oh gosh this is so funny. I think all Americans think of Australians as really friendly and like them. It's because of movies and commercials and actors that we all love, I guess.

When I lived in Nashville, I was in line at Opryland with my husband and daughter and started chatting with a family from Australia. The husband was with the Australian navy and overseeing some ships being built on the Mississippi River, as I recall, around St. Louis. They had a couple of young boys, and I had a daughter about their age. We really hit it off and we invited them to my husband's birthday party the next day. They came and we all had a wonderful time. My husband was a drummer and the basement was full of instruments and drums and the kids all had a great time down there. There were a lot of people and kids. We had fresh oysters and a barbie (barbecue) and drinks and music. Such a lovely time.

The Australian culture is very friendly, so unless you are around seriously stodgy people, you should make friends wherever you go.

In my opinion, the friendliest Americans are Texans. If I was ever forced to leave the west coast, I'd relocate to Texas just because they're the most friendly people I've ever met. I've been to Canada, California, Oregon, Washington, Tennessee and Mexico, and have visited Maine, which I would not call friendly to outsiders.

It's quite possible that Kansas will be friendlier than Seattle. So, you'll have to decide what's more important to you. But, in my opinion, you'll also be able to make friends in Seattle, just because your culture is friendly and open.

Best of luck and happiness to you.
Friendliness in Texas may have something to do with the south's tradition of politeness. I think the south in general is the friendliest part of the country.

FYI- What an odd question comparing KC to Seattle? The towns are so different I wouldn't even know where to begin.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top