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Old 11-12-2015, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,039 posts, read 23,933,408 times
Reputation: 30941

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I don't see 'em where I live. But I live in by far the most urban and dense state in the nation, 20 miles outside NYC, so my experiences are probably more of a rural/urban divide than anything.
You live in New Jersey. You can't even buy fireworks there. Apparently, sparklers are deadly.

In that region, Pennsylvania is the land of the free. You can buy all of the guns and ammo you can afford without jumping through many hoops. That doesn't make it a dangerous place.
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Old 11-12-2015, 09:39 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,744 posts, read 6,149,250 times
Reputation: 3598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
It's not much of an argument to be honest. Your parameters are so broad until it renders the notion of culture itself to be absolutely meaningless.
You're right, it isn't an argument, or perhaps one that can be logically argued against. Furthermore, I'm not saying culture is meaningless, but aside from cosmetic differences, Rural/urban areas of both regions have the same kinds of people, customs, religious beliefs, political beliefs, celebrate the same holidays..etc.
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Old 11-13-2015, 12:08 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,396,115 times
Reputation: 18525
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
You're right, it isn't an argument, or perhaps one that can be logically argued against. Furthermore, I'm not saying culture is meaningless, but aside from cosmetic differences, Rural/urban areas of both regions have the same kinds of people, customs, religious beliefs, political beliefs, celebrate the same holidays..etc.
That's not completely true, but okay.
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Old 11-13-2015, 05:41 PM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,321 posts, read 3,006,870 times
Reputation: 4110
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
True for the Baltimore area too. Bass Pro is the only place I've seen them. Pawn shops too, maybe.
Cross the bridge and head over to this side. Gun shops a plenty and that's just the small mom & pop's type of places. Of course there are the national stores as well. And then there are all the "gun bashes" at the local firehouses. Needless to say I prefer this side of the state. More my style over here.

As far as Mid-Atlantic? I just can't call anything north of MD Mid-Atlantic. Those states border Canada. Likewise I can't call call any state south of VA as Mid-Atlantic either. The Mid Atlantic to me is a blend, from true and pure Northeast such as south Jersey (south of the MD/PA border extended eastward) to pure and true southern such as VA, with MD being the quintessential Mid-Atlantic blend (oh, and DE). In those 4 states there are plenty of business with Mid-Atlantic in their name. Many also including Delmarva as well showing that at least the eastern parts of MD/VA/ and slower lower DE are pretty much the same.

And I'll add to the discussion that I believe this north/south can be carried a bit far. I mean, who really cares? We are all more similar then different. My Jersey and NY friends are pretty much identical to all my southern friends (with the exception of talking funny). But I'm from MD so my marble filled mouth should stay shut when it comes to talking funny. (I really got a kick out of my first time in Staten Island when the lady at the deli told me to look at her when I talked as she couldn't understand a word I was saying. She said I had too strong of a southern accent. STATEN ISLAND and I'm the one with an accent? HAHAHA!) But then again I can understand and fit in with the eastern Carolina accent much better then understanding the Staten Island one.
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Old 11-14-2015, 02:33 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,744 posts, read 6,149,250 times
Reputation: 3598
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
Cross the bridge and head over to this side. Gun shops a plenty and that's just the small mom & pop's type of places. Of course there are the national stores as well. And then there are all the "gun bashes" at the local firehouses. Needless to say I prefer this side of the state. More my style over here.

As far as Mid-Atlantic? I just can't call anything north of MD Mid-Atlantic. Those states border Canada. Likewise I can't call call any state south of VA as Mid-Atlantic either. The Mid Atlantic to me is a blend, from true and pure Northeast such as south Jersey (south of the MD/PA border extended eastward) to pure and true southern such as VA, with MD being the quintessential Mid-Atlantic blend (oh, and DE). In those 4 states there are plenty of business with Mid-Atlantic in their name. Many also including Delmarva as well showing that at least the eastern parts of MD/VA/ and slower lower DE are pretty much the same.

And I'll add to the discussion that I believe this north/south can be carried a bit far. I mean, who really cares? We are all more similar then different. My Jersey and NY friends are pretty much identical to all my southern friends (with the exception of talking funny). But I'm from MD so my marble filled mouth should stay shut when it comes to talking funny. (I really got a kick out of my first time in Staten Island when the lady at the deli told me to look at her when I talked as she couldn't understand a word I was saying. She said I had too strong of a southern accent. STATEN ISLAND and I'm the one with an accent? HAHAHA!) But then again I can understand and fit in with the eastern Carolina accent much better then understanding the Staten Island one.
I've heard black people from the eastern shore speak, and I didn't get a southern accent from any of them. I actually spent a few days with a group of women from Salisbury, and even tho it wasn't close to a Baltimore accent, it sounded nothing like a southern accent... Just something completely different.
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Old 11-14-2015, 03:03 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,568,120 times
Reputation: 2194
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
Cross the bridge and head over to this side. Gun shops a plenty and that's just the small mom & pop's type of places. Of course there are the national stores as well. And then there are all the "gun bashes" at the local firehouses. Needless to say I prefer this side of the state. More my style over here.

As far as Mid-Atlantic? I just can't call anything north of MD Mid-Atlantic. Those states border Canada. Likewise I can't call call any state south of VA as Mid-Atlantic either. The Mid Atlantic to me is a blend, from true and pure Northeast such as south Jersey (south of the MD/PA border extended eastward) to pure and true southern such as VA, with MD being the quintessential Mid-Atlantic blend (oh, and DE). In those 4 states there are plenty of business with Mid-Atlantic in their name. Many also including Delmarva as well showing that at least the eastern parts of MD/VA/ and slower lower DE are pretty much the same.

And I'll add to the discussion that I believe this north/south can be carried a bit far. I mean, who really cares? We are all more similar then different. My Jersey and NY friends are pretty much identical to all my southern friends (with the exception of talking funny). But I'm from MD so my marble filled mouth should stay shut when it comes to talking funny. (I really got a kick out of my first time in Staten Island when the lady at the deli told me to look at her when I talked as she couldn't understand a word I was saying. She said I had too strong of a southern accent. STATEN ISLAND and I'm the one with an accent? HAHAHA!) But then again I can understand and fit in with the eastern Carolina accent much better then understanding the Staten Island one.
thats funny, my dad spent alot of his childhood on the eastern shore and his accent is very southern , I love hearing him say worcester, wurrchestrr .

we always kept the worchestire sauce at the end of the table so he would have to ask for it . lol

have you ever been to smith island? its like a mixture of elizabethan english and midatlantic and southern
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Old 11-25-2015, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Richmond, Virginia
150 posts, read 151,622 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
Cross the bridge and head over to this side. Gun shops a plenty and that's just the small mom & pop's type of places. Of course there are the national stores as well. And then there are all the "gun bashes" at the local firehouses. Needless to say I prefer this side of the state. More my style over here.

As far as Mid-Atlantic? I just can't call anything north of MD Mid-Atlantic. Those states border Canada. Likewise I can't call call any state south of VA as Mid-Atlantic either. The Mid Atlantic to me is a blend, from true and pure Northeast such as south Jersey (south of the MD/PA border extended eastward) to pure and true southern such as VA, with MD being the quintessential Mid-Atlantic blend (oh, and DE). In those 4 states there are plenty of business with Mid-Atlantic in their name. Many also including Delmarva as well showing that at least the eastern parts of MD/VA/ and slower lower DE are pretty much the same.

And I'll add to the discussion that I believe this north/south can be carried a bit far. I mean, who really cares? We are all more similar then different. My Jersey and NY friends are pretty much identical to all my southern friends (with the exception of talking funny). But I'm from MD so my marble filled mouth should stay shut when it comes to talking funny. (I really got a kick out of my first time in Staten Island when the lady at the deli told me to look at her when I talked as she couldn't understand a word I was saying. She said I had too strong of a southern accent. STATEN ISLAND and I'm the one with an accent? HAHAHA!) But then again I can understand and fit in with the eastern Carolina accent much better then understanding the Staten Island one.
Virginia was never considered Mid-Atlantic until recently. My guess is it has to do with DC Metro taking up half and the negative associations people have of our Southern past.
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Old 11-25-2015, 04:57 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,753,027 times
Reputation: 931
The census bureau subregion of Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ/PA) seems to be more administrative term (meaning non-New England Northeast) than anything else. I think they would just say they're in the Northeast if they had to pick a region.

Mid-Atlantic identity prevails in DC/MD/VA.

These two "mid-Atlantics" aren't the same region at all IMO.
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Old 11-25-2015, 05:26 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,911,493 times
Reputation: 6424
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
The census bureau subregion of Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ/PA) seems to be more administrative term (meaning non-New England Northeast) than anything else. I think they would just say they're in the Northeast if they had to pick a region.

Mid-Atlantic identity prevails in DC/MD/VA.

These two "mid-Atlantics" aren't the same region at all IMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rvabread22 View Post
Virginia was never considered Mid-Atlantic until recently. My guess is it has to do with DC Metro taking up half and the negative associations people have of our Southern past.
The census definition seems to be for the historical area of the Middle Atlantic, which has been increasingly taken over by former Southern states, notably Maryland, probably for the reason Rvabread mentioned. Today there are people think that Maryland is the heart of the Mid-Atlantic but that was probably not the case a hundred years ago.
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Old 11-26-2015, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Richmond, Virginia
150 posts, read 151,622 times
Reputation: 119
I'm okay with Mid-Atlantic as very arbitrary way to divide states along the coast. Even if Virginia is largely Southern, and that category is misleading.

My main issue is when its used to define as a sub region of the Northeast. As in "Northeast and Mid Atlantic". Not to repeat myself, but there. Maryland has Southern qualities to it, but it doesn't seem to be at such odds with that category. Virginia grows cotton and peanuts and that just doesn't sound very "Mid Atlantic" to me.
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