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Old 11-07-2015, 02:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
If anything, NC, TN, and KY has that dull upper South thing going on.
What "dull upper South thing"?
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Old 11-07-2015, 06:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
I consider Maryland and Delaware to be a part of the North East.

Mid Atlantic is just to differentiate from New England. Both are North East regions though.
Historically Virginia and Maryland are a part of the south. The British colonies in the American south were divided into two regions: the Chesapeake colonies, which included Maryland and Virginia, and the Southern colonies, which included Georgia and the Carolinas.

The Middle or Mid Atlantic colonies comprise of two areas (1) New York and New Jersey which was established and settled by the Dutch and (2) Pennsylvania and Delaware which were settled by the several thousand Dutch, Swedish, and English “squatters” prior to King Charles II granting William Penn proprietary rights to a region north of Maryland and west of the Delaware River in 1681. In 1682, the Duke of York granted Penn the colony of Delaware, which was the area between Maryland and the Delaware River. The colony was named after Lord De La Warr, a harsh military governor who came to Virginia in 1610. Delaware was closely associated with Pennsylvania for many years, and in 1703 it was granted its own assembly. From then until the American Revolution it had its own assembly but remained under the governor of Pennsylvania.

Both Virginia and Maryland historically belong to the South. New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania historically belong to the Mid Atlantic. This spinning Maryland into the northern region is a recent occurrence that runs contrary to where it has historically been placed.
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Old 11-07-2015, 09:44 AM
 
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Maryland is below the mason dixon line but baltimore and washington dc has drastically changed the politics of the state. There are so many different accents in maryland but DC is so transient so alot of the maryland suburbs are pretty generic . My dad still pronounces maryland "Murrland" upper marlboro "Upprmarlburrrra" montgomery "Mungummmmry" sort of a southern drawl but different, alot of the eastern shore/tidewater accent on his side of the family

the eastern shore is fascinating, some was influenced by the tidewater accent and some of the islands like smith have very old english pronunciations, great accents from isolation to the other accents ,like the outer banks in north carolina. baltimore has a definite accent,western maryland has sort of appalachian influence. tons of different accents in a very small state.
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Old 11-07-2015, 12:38 PM
 
6,195 posts, read 6,358,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyadic View Post
Historically Virginia and Maryland are a part of the south. The British colonies in the American south were divided into two regions: the Chesapeake colonies, which included Maryland and Virginia, and the Southern colonies, which included Georgia and the Carolinas.

The Middle or Mid Atlantic colonies comprise of two areas (1) New York and New Jersey which was established and settled by the Dutch and (2) Pennsylvania and Delaware which were settled by the several thousand Dutch, Swedish, and English “squatters” prior to King Charles II granting William Penn proprietary rights to a region north of Maryland and west of the Delaware River in 1681. In 1682, the Duke of York granted Penn the colony of Delaware, which was the area between Maryland and the Delaware River. The colony was named after Lord De La Warr, a harsh military governor who came to Virginia in 1610. Delaware was closely associated with Pennsylvania for many years, and in 1703 it was granted its own assembly. From then until the American Revolution it had its own assembly but remained under the governor of Pennsylvania.

Both Virginia and Maryland historically belong to the South. New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania historically belong to the Mid Atlantic. This spinning Maryland into the northern region is a recent occurrence that runs contrary to where it has historically been placed.
I think over time, it has slowly became more Northeastern than Southern. During the Civil War, it was apart of the North.
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Old 11-07-2015, 12:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
I think over time, it has slowly became more Northeastern than Southern. During the Civil War, it was apart of the North.
Maryland wasn't a part of the North during the Civil War; it simply remained in the Union due to federal intervention. It was a slave state and had Jim Crow laws firmly in place so historically, it was indeed Southern.
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Old 11-07-2015, 02:15 PM
 
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The reason there is a cannon and fort at federal hill was because it was the union aiming it at baltimore to " guarantee the allegiance of the city and the state of Maryland to the Federal Government under threat of force"

this is from the maryland state song " maryland my maryland "

Dear Mother! burst the tyrant's chain,
Maryland!
Virginia should not call in vain,
Maryland!
She meets her sisters on the plain-
"Sic semper!" 'tis the proud refrain
That baffles minions back amain,
Maryland! My Maryland!

I hear the distant thunder-hum,
Maryland!
The Old Line's bugle, fife, and drum,
Maryland!
She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb-
Huzza! she spurns the Northern scum!
She breathes! she burns! she'll come! she'll come!
Maryland! My Maryland!

Maryland also gave the world this man

Wikimedia commons photo

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Old 11-07-2015, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Richmond, Virginia
150 posts, read 151,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
You're exaggerating. The reason I say this is because RVA anchors Central VA and I'm sure that you're more familiar with RVA. I'm from ATL and lived in RVA man....you'd definitely fit-in in BMore over anywhere in GA.



Couldn't have summed it up better. I love the Mid-Atlantic region, it fits me well.



Exactly, great post. It always drove me crazy when people on these boards try to knock VA's designation as a majority Mid-Atlantic state (Hampton Roads, RVA, Charlottesville, and of course Northern Virginia has that mixed regional feel going on).

If anything, NC, TN, and KY has that dull upper South thing going on. (that Northeast portion of NC is just an extension of VA...OBX)
Funny, but Atlanta is actually less Southern than Richmond.At least to me. I do not fit in with folks from Baltimore. They talk weird.Do people in Baltimore even know what pimento cheese is? No, they don't. I can't believe you could lump Richmond in with Baltimore/Philly culture. Just because we both have row houses? Charleston has row houses. To me, they are more like us. Also, if you say Virginia is Mid-Atlantic, then Kentucky should be called the Midwest.

Last edited by rvabread22; 11-07-2015 at 06:28 PM..
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Old 11-07-2015, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Richmond, Virginia
150 posts, read 151,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
same. below that is the south. This is just my opinion, but people in the Mid-Atlantic do not say "y'all"
I am from Virginia and I say Y'all. And so do most people I know. Although "you guys" has been creeping the last decade or so.
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Old 11-07-2015, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Richmond, Virginia
150 posts, read 151,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
The modern day dividing line of North/South if created would be the Potomac River no doubt, however that does not mean Virginia isn't mid-Atlantic because it is. IMO the mid-Atlantic stretches down from New Jersey all the way through Virginia beach. Every little stepping stone in between is a different level of mid-Atlantic as it intensifies the further north you go.

Leaving New Jersey when you cross the bridge going South into Delaware towards Baltimore/DC you immediately see the Chesapeake Bay signs for MD, DE, and VA tidewater areas. Anything Chesapeake Bay related is mid-Atlantic, it's all a part of a broader "sub-region" than most make it out to be, despite the differences that say Virginia may have with the northern most states in the sub-region. Virginia can keep all of its "upper south" traits and still be VERY mid-Atlantic.
With the exception of the DC area, I don't find Virginia to be very 'Mid Atlantic". Its just plain 'ol Southern. I mean yes it has more Northern qualities about it then say- Alabama, but that doesn't mean its a Northern state. It was a Southern colony, not a Middle one. Its climate, culture and everything are not very Northern IMO. If Virginia must bec considered Mid Atlantic- then Why is Kentucky not considered the Midwest, then? Virginia was at least in the Confederacy.
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Old 11-07-2015, 07:39 PM
 
899 posts, read 764,676 times
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Tidewater has been considered Mid-Atlantic for decades, probably long before NoVa ever was.
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