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Old 11-10-2015, 03:57 PM
 
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I can say for my home state, Tremont/Cleveland makes sense.

As for Florida, I haven't personally been to Wynwood Miami. I would say it certainly has competition from Mills 50 Orlando and Grand Central in St Pete though.
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Old 11-10-2015, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
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I have never been to the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn but I have often heard it compared to many areas of Portland, Or especially the neighborhood in which I used to live.
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Old 11-12-2015, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
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Looks like I'm also living in the Brooklyn of the 1980s.

New ABC drama 'Murder Town' set in Wilmington
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Old 11-12-2015, 10:18 AM
 
Location: USA
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Forget about it. There is nowhere else like Brooklyn, not even the new Brooklyn. They just wanna be Brooklyn.
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Old 11-12-2015, 11:40 AM
 
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tbh even williamsburg isn't that gentrified, only the northern part of the neighborhood is
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Old 11-12-2015, 12:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
I don't think anyone has posted this article here. Correct me if I'm wrong. If so, and this is a repeat thread, feel free to close/remove it mods!

We've had a few conversations about what place will be "the next Brooklyn." Here's a list of every "Brooklyn" in each state. Living in CA and KY, I can say that Silverlake and NuLu definitely seem right, so I'm assuming the others pretty accurate too.

https://www.thrillist.com/entertainm...of-every-state
I'm surprised they chose Silverlake over the Mission District in San Francisco.
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Old 11-12-2015, 04:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jhenma View Post
I'm surprised they chose Silverlake over the Mission District in San Francisco.
I was expecting the Mission. But after thinking about it, the Mission was hipster for a few years, but it's almost totally gentrified SF tech bro central now. Obviously there are pockets that haven't turned into this, but you get the point. Silverlake is still pretty "hipster" in the sense that it's not fully gentrified to the point of being sterile like a lot the Mission has now. Kinda the same thing with Venice. Was hipster for a few years, but has been sterilized more than Silverlake. Even the Mission isn't really the Mission anymore. I'd say it's more so Oakland. If I had to compare them, I'd say Silverlake is like Oakland and Venice is like the Mission.
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Old 11-12-2015, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
I was expecting the Mission. But after thinking about it, the Mission was hipster for a few years, but it's almost totally gentrified SF tech bro central now. Obviously there are pockets that haven't turned into this, but you get the point. Silverlake is still pretty "hipster" in the sense that it's not fully gentrified to the point of being sterile like a lot the Mission has now. Kinda the same thing with Venice. Was hipster for a few years, but has been sterilized more than Silverlake. Even the Mission isn't really the Mission anymore. I'd say it's more so Oakland. If I had to compare them, I'd say Silverlake is like Oakland and Venice is like the Mission.

Huh? No.

I don't understand the connection between Venice and the Mission at all. Not even in the slightest.

Venice has been upper-middle class for a long, long time. Venice Beach is a tourist trap, where stoners from Des Moines buy Bob Marley t-shirts, and it's been as such for decades.

The Mission, rather, has deep Mexican roots. The Mission and the Tenderloin were San Francisco's last gentrification hold-outs in the aughts. That's why everyone has been so viscerally upset about the Mission's gentrification.

Venice was never a hold-out because it was never working class. It was always an LA beach-front neighborhood.

The Silver Lake-Oakland comparison I can better understand, but it still doesn't fly. Silver Lake was a Hispanic neighborhood; Oakland is black. Suburban whites are scared of blacks but not Hispanics, and because of this, Hispanic neighborhoods gentrify faster. This is why Bushwick is gentrifying faster than Bed-Stuy in NYC. 10-15 years ago, I had friends moving to Silver Lake because they wanted to; my friends who were moving to Oakland were doing so because they couldn't afford anything else. Silver Lake is more gentrified--and more "hipster"--than Oakland will ever be.

Furthermore, Silver Lake is a neighborhood and Oakland is a city. So, while parts of Oakland may be somewhat reminiscent of Silver Lake, the city as a whole is not.

Last edited by Dawn.Davenport; 11-12-2015 at 06:51 PM..
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Old 11-12-2015, 06:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Huh? No.

I don't understand the connection between Venice and the Mission at all. Not even in the slightest.

Venice has been upper-middle class for a long, long time. Venice Beach is a tourist trap, where stoners from Des Moines buy Bob Marley t-shirts, and it's been as such for decades.

The Mission, rather, has deep Mexican roots. The Mission and the Tenderloin were San Francisco's gentrification hold-outs in the aughts, but Venice was never a hold-out. That's why everyone is so viscerally upset about the Mission's gentrification over the last 10-15 years.

Venice was never gentrified because it wasn't working class. It was always an LA beach-front neighborhood.

The Silver Lake-Oakland comparison I can better understand, but it still doesn't fly. Silver Lake was a Hispanic neighborhood; Oakland is black. Suburban whites are scared of blacks but not Hispanics, and because of this, Hispanic neighborhoods gentrify faster. This is why Bushwick is gentrifying faster than Bed-Stuy in NYC. Fifteen years ago, I had friends moving to Silver Lake because they wanted to; my friends who were moving to Oakland were doing so because they couldn't afford anything else. Silver Lake is more gentrified--and more "hipster"--than Oakland will ever be.

Furthermore, Silver Lake is a neighborhood and Oakland is a city. So, while parts of Oakland may be reminiscent of Silver Lake, the city as a whole does not.
I'm assuming you don't know Venice then. It's the birthplace of gangs in America basically. I grew up two neighborhoods from Venice and last place I lived before leaving LA was one neighborhood away. I grew up going to the Boardwalk with family, or driving through to go to Santa Monica. High school years we went to pretty ratchet house parties there. Even today there's still quite a bit of crime there. It has not been upper-middle class for that long. Besides the few pockets like along the canals and closest to the beach, it's been a ghetto for a long time.

The Mission wasn't a hold out for gentrification. It was the epicenter of gentrification. Good location and cheap housing. Same with Venice. Good location. Cheap housing (comparatively to other beach cities). Gangs ran Venice for a long time. The homeless still run parts of Venice and not until maybe last year but especially this year, the parts of Venice east of Lincoln had not been touched by gentrification.

Literally straight from Venice's Wiki page:

Los Angeles had neglected Venice so long that, by the 1950s, it had become the "Slum by the Sea." With the exception of new police and fire stations in 1930, the city spent little on improvements after annexation. The city did not pave Trolleyway (Pacific Avenue) until 1954 when county and state funds became available. Low rents for run-down bungalows attracted predominantly European immigrants (including a substantial number of Holocaust survivors) and young counterculture artists, poets, and writers. The Beat Generation hung out at the Gas House on Ocean Front Walk and at Venice West Cafe on Dudley. Police raids were frequent during that era."

The Venice Shoreline Crips and the Latino Venice 13 (V-13) are the two main gangs active in Venice. V13 dates back to the 1950s, while the Shoreline Crips were founded in the early 1970s, making them one of the first Crip sets in Los Angeles.

In the early 1990s V-13 and the Shoreline Crips were involved in a bloody, brutal war over crack cocaine sales territories.

While violence has decreased, they continue to remain active in Venice. By 2002, numbers of gang members in Venice were reduced due to gentrification and increased police presence. According to a Los Angeles City Beat article, by 2003, many Los Angeles Westside gang members resettled in the city of Inglewood.[8] Author John Brodie challenges the idea of gentrification causing change and commented "... the gunplay of the Shoreline Crips and the V-13 is as much a part of life in Venice as pit bulls playing with blond Labs at the local dog park.

The Oakwood portion of Venice, also known as "Ghost Town" and the "Oakwood Pentagon," lies inland from the tourist areas and is one of the few historically African American areas in West Los Angeles; Latinos now constitute the overwhelming majority of the residents. During the age of restrictive covenants that enforced racial segregation, Oakwood was set aside as a settlement area for Black-Americans, who came by the hundreds to Venice to work in the oil fields during the 1930s and 1940s. After the construction of the San Diego Freeway, which passed through predominantly Mexican American and immigrant communities, those groups moved further west and into Oakwood where black residents were already established. White-Americans moved into Oakwood during the 1980s and 1990s and Latinos moved out.

Xinachtli, a Latino student group from Venice High School and subset of MEChA, refers to Oakwood as one of last beachside communities of color in California. Chicanos, Hispanics, and Latinos of any race or ethnicity make up over 50% of Venice High School's student body.
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Old 11-12-2015, 07:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by phillydominican View Post
I can name tons of Brooklyn neighborhoods that havent been no where near being half way gentrified: Brownsville (predominatly lower class Black) , ENY (predominately lower class Black/Hispanic), Flatbush (predominantly working class Black), Canarsie (predominantly middle class Black), Crown Heights(predominately working class Black), Sunset Park(predominantly working class Hispanic), Coney Island(predominately wprking class white/black/hispanic), Bay Ridge(predominantly working class white/asian) to name a few... Bensonhurst, Sheepshead bay, Bergen beach are others.
My mom grew up in Flatlands, and I was there all the time as a kid. Now that's a part of Brooklyn that will never gentrify, along with its surrounding neighborhoods such as Mill Basin and Marine Park. You can see why by glancing at a subway map -- it's really the only part of Brooklyn the subway doesn't touch. It's far from everything. Even people from Brooklyn barely know it exists, which is why you didn't mention it. I bet you most twentysomething trust-fund kids in Greenpoint have never even heard of Flatlands. These aren't rough neighborhoods, they're just completely undesirable to gentrifiers. I'm intimately familiar with hipster Brooklyn, but part of me still thinks it's weird when people talk about it like it's all Williamsburg, because the Brooklyn I grew up with was very different and still is.
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