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Old 11-19-2015, 07:34 AM
 
Location: East Coast
678 posts, read 693,022 times
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The thing is, while a place like Minneapolis gives you most of the same amenities as New York, etc., it can never replace the FEELING of being in New York. The hustle and bustle, the architecture, the miles and miles of walkable streets, the throngs of people...
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Old 11-20-2015, 03:54 PM
 
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I do not.

MSP is a nice city, lots to see and do with a good vibe, but the weather is absolutely BRUTAL. It is also expensive and taxes are high.
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Old 11-21-2015, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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For me, I prefer first tier cities for visits, but I think second and third tier cities are more livable unless you are very wealthy or have a very high paying job.

I personally think the sweet spot for cities (to live in) is about 1 million to 3 million. At that size there are usually plenty of restaurants, bars, activities, entertainment options, etc, but they are often less expensive with less traffic.

If you can live in Tribeca, the Presidio, Dupont Circle in DC, etc, then by all means do that, but if not, then I think second tier cities are better than less desirable areas of first tier cities.
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Old 11-21-2015, 05:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by po-boy View Post
I personally think the sweet spot for cities (to live in) is about 1 million to 3 million.
Surely you are referring to Metro areas with that population? Because in the US, a city population of 1-3 million does not place it outside of the first-tier group. And does not come with benefits such as being less expensive and better traffic.
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Old 11-22-2015, 11:09 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,031 posts, read 4,123,391 times
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I don't have to live in a first-tier city, but I wish I lived in a city that offered a bit more than where I currently live. Many times the lower COL and decreased competition can make living in a midsized city more desirable.
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Old 11-22-2015, 11:13 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,031 posts, read 4,123,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by po-boy View Post
I personally think the sweet spot for cities (to live in) is about 1 million to 3 million. At that size there are usually plenty of restaurants, bars, activities, entertainment options, etc, but they are often less expensive with less traffic.
There is a pretty big difference between metro areas in the 1 million population range to the 3 million range.

Compare OKC, Jacksonville, and Memphis with Charlotte, Austin, and Denver. I would say the sweet spot is 2 million to 3 million, with certain cities in the 1-2 million range being acceptable while others are not quite there. I could live in New Orleans, Richmond, or Louisville despite them being smaller cities. They are urban and compact enough that they offer a lot more than OKC and Memphis which are virtually the same size population wise.
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Old 11-23-2015, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,850 posts, read 36,203,761 times
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I prefer living in a mid sized or even small metro area with the amenities of a big city close by.

I live an hour and a half from Dallas - close but not too close. That's my personal preference. I enjoy visiting huge cities but prefer living in a suburban area removed from all the crowds, noise, pollution, and high cost of living. But hey, that's just me.
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Old 11-23-2015, 08:04 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,257 posts, read 19,555,335 times
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Basically, if you prefer to live around traditional Americans more (mainly whites with some African Americans mixed in), then small and mid-sized metro areas are better.

On the other hand, if you like to spice things up and get more internationally and religiously diverse, then the larger metro areas are the way to go.
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Old 11-23-2015, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,850 posts, read 36,203,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Basically, if you prefer to live around traditional Americans more (mainly whites with some African Americans mixed in), then small and mid-sized metro areas are better.

On the other hand, if you like to spice things up and get more internationally diverse, then the larger metro areas are the way to go.
Here in Texas (not just the huge metros, but even in many smaller cities) white, non Hispanic folks make up less than 50 percent of the population. Texas is one of four states that are "majority-minority" meaning that even though the largest percentage of the population is "white, non Hispanic," that percentage is less than 50 percent of the total.
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Old 11-23-2015, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Syracuse, New York
3,114 posts, read 2,526,448 times
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First-tier cities are to large for me. I used to prefer cities with metros in the 2 to 4 million range but now would like to live in a metro of around a million to a million and a half.
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