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Old 06-22-2016, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,743,366 times
Reputation: 5374

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kemba View Post
I don't doubt that. What I was saying was that some people who want to lose their accents, like myself, try to, but can't.
Ah, I gotcha.

I always feel a twinge of sadness when somebody desires the loss of their accent. It always makes me wonder why; nobody should have to be ashamed of how they sound.
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Old 06-25-2016, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Leominster MA
48 posts, read 24,393 times
Reputation: 125
Many do lose the northern accent. My cousin (grew up in New England) moved to North Carolina at 18. When I saw him again a year or two later, I was shocked at how strong his newly-acquired southern accent was. He sounded like he'd lived in the south his entire life. I figured his accent would change a bit but didn't think it would be that drastic, or that quick.

I think it depends on a lot of factors if someone loses their accent or not. How old were they when they moved, how strong was their accent before, how noticeable are the people's accents in the place they moved to. Not to mention that some people make a conscious effort in adopting the accent of their new home, kinda forcing it at first until it becomes natural to them, while other people make a conscious effort to avoid changing the way they speak, wanting to keep their old accent.
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Old 06-26-2016, 12:38 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
18,594 posts, read 19,568,094 times
Reputation: 48831
My step sister did, NJ to AL back in the 60's. Now in CA for 30 years and still sounds like she's still in AL.
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Old 06-27-2016, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Kekaha, Hawaii
306 posts, read 219,416 times
Reputation: 371
I don't want to lose mine 'cause the Wisconsin accent is sexy.


Right?
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Old 02-23-2017, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
1,964 posts, read 1,459,647 times
Reputation: 2172
I LOVE my Southern accent! I would hate to lose it. Now, I am an English teacher, so I am not the type to slander grammar patterns, but I find the southern accent soothing and have stayed in my south Atlanta suburb trying to help my children pick up their "native tongue". I even have to have a Santa Claus with a southern accent (The one outside Macy's at Lenox Square on upper Peachtree has a lovely one). Now, the other poster is correct in that there are several types of southern accents:
1. Appalachian (Kentucky, East Tennessee, Western North/ South Carolina, southwestern Virginia) This IS the one that Dolly Pardon and my western North Carolina raised Baptist preacher speaks.
2. Coastal southern (Charleston to Savannah including the barrier islands of the Georgia and South Carolina coasts) This is the accent that Hollywood garbels when they try to fake it for the entire south. It is soft and wispy and really strings out vowels.
3. Upcountry southern (follows the piedmonts of the Carolinas through Georgia, Alabama, even into northern Mississippi) Alas, this is MY native tongue. It isn't as elegant sounding as the coastal accent. We speak a little faster, but there is a wilt and drawl on final syllables. This is how the natives (not transplants) of many Deep South large Metros speak (Atlanta, Birmingham, etc) and has NOTHING to do with incorrect verb or pronoun usage. "Y'all" is definitely in this vernacular.
The Southern accent sounds musical to me, as I have said before, it would kill me for my children to grow up without it.
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Old 05-04-2017, 01:56 PM
 
5 posts, read 3,777 times
Reputation: 10
I know why the northern accent is hated especially ny and nj. It is because the ethnicities connected with these accents are disliked. Say it like it is please. Why don't other accents of foreigners bother ya'll. Because ya'll don't have the guts to disparage other groups such as Hispanics, middle easterners, etc.
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Old 05-04-2017, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,743,366 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by zactbeare View Post
I know why the northern accent is hated especially ny and nj. It is because the ethnicities connected with these accents are disliked. Say it like it is please. Why don't other accents of foreigners bother ya'll. Because ya'll don't have the guts to disparage other groups such as Hispanics, middle easterners, etc.
What? Can you maybe elaborate on this, please?

Besides, NY has many regional accents. There is no one "NY accent".
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Old 05-04-2017, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,016 posts, read 644,139 times
Reputation: 2045
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
What? Can you maybe elaborate on this, please?

Besides, NY has many regional accents. There is no one "NY accent".
After all my years of living in the Northeast, I would venture to guess that the lowest common denominator English accent in New York (i.e., the one most closely approximates General American English) is probably found in the region that lies north and east of Troy, bounded on the north by the Canadian border and on the east by the Vermont state line.
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Old 05-05-2017, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,743,366 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
After all my years of living in the Northeast, I would venture to guess that the lowest common denominator English accent in New York (i.e., the one most closely approximates General American English) is probably found in the region that lies north and east of Troy, bounded on the north by the Canadian border and on the east by the Vermont state line.
In general, yes. Though you can detect a difference from the southern tier to the Ontario coast out here in what I call NY's "snout".
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Old 05-08-2017, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
1,462 posts, read 1,447,895 times
Reputation: 1878
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocelots View Post
Many do lose the northern accent. My cousin (grew up in New England) moved to North Carolina at 18. When I saw him again a year or two later, I was shocked at how strong his newly-acquired southern accent was. He sounded like he'd lived in the south his entire life. I figured his accent would change a bit but didn't think it would be that drastic, or that quick.
That's pretty astonishing to hear, considering I've lived in NC my entire life and have no southern accent, and most people I know don't either... what part did he move to?
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