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Old 05-20-2017, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,094 posts, read 3,413,462 times
Reputation: 7765

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
I LOVE my Southern accent! I would hate to lose it. Now, I am an English teacher, so I am not the type to slander grammar patterns, but I find the southern accent soothing and have stayed in my south Atlanta suburb trying to help my children pick up their "native tongue". I even have to have a Santa Claus with a southern accent (The one outside Macy's at Lenox Square on upper Peachtree has a lovely one). Now, the other poster is correct in that there are several types of southern accents:
1. Appalachian (Kentucky, East Tennessee, Western North/ South Carolina, southwestern Virginia) This IS the one that Dolly Pardon and my western North Carolina raised Baptist preacher speaks.
2. Coastal southern (Charleston to Savannah including the barrier islands of the Georgia and South Carolina coasts) This is the accent that Hollywood garbels when they try to fake it for the entire south. It is soft and wispy and really strings out vowels.
3. Upcountry southern (follows the piedmonts of the Carolinas through Georgia, Alabama, even into northern Mississippi) Alas, this is MY native tongue. It isn't as elegant sounding as the coastal accent. We speak a little faster, but there is a wilt and drawl on final syllables. This is how the natives (not transplants) of many Deep South large Metros speak (Atlanta, Birmingham, etc) and has NOTHING to do with incorrect verb or pronoun usage. "Y'all" is definitely in this vernacular.
The Southern accent sounds musical to me, as I have said before, it would kill me for my children to grow up without it.


But.. but... but... Santa Claus is from the North Pole!
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Old 05-21-2017, 02:36 PM
 
Location: DFW
6,804 posts, read 11,800,721 times
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My theory is that Northerners are "proud" of their accent, whether consciously or subconsciously. Every time I go to the Northeast, I hear the Northern accent everywhere, both in rural and urban areas whereas down south, the Southern accent isn't heard as often. Less than maybe half the people I run into in Texas have a Southern or country accent and I've been told that the similar accents of Arizona and Southern California have all but disappeared in modern times among locals.
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Old 05-21-2017, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,753,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
My theory is that Northerners are "proud" of their accent, whether consciously or subconsciously. Every time I go to the Northeast, I hear the Northern accent everywhere, both in rural and urban areas whereas down south, the Southern accent isn't heard as often. Less than maybe half the people I run into in Texas have a Southern or country accent and I've been told that the similar accents of Arizona and Southern California have all but disappeared in modern times among locals.
I don't think it is that so much as that so many northerners have moved south over time that the older accents are diluted. Top that off with mass media being dominated by accents from outside the south, you have the human sub-conscious growing up on what is becoming the more standard American speech.

Not as many southerners have moved north by comparison.
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Old 05-22-2017, 07:46 AM
 
774 posts, read 1,699,329 times
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[quote=ragnarkar;48233659]My theory is that Northerners are "proud" of their accent, whether consciously or subconsciously.


Not me! I've tried for years to shed my New York accent and have lost a good bit of it. I've listened to myself lately and it doesn't sound that bad, but maybe I've been self-conditioned because I still kind of cringe inside when someone comments on my accent, which is still fairly common. I have noticed during my last couple of visits to NYC, Long Island, and nearby areas, the accent seems to be fading among the younger people there and I have met some Millennials that have lived their whole lives in the area that don't have any traces of the accent whatsoever.
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Old 05-22-2017, 07:54 AM
 
Location: USA o(*_*)o
578 posts, read 571,134 times
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Y'all Come....
I was born in Florida, people born in Fl do not have a southern accent.
I grew up in Maryland. Most people think I am from New England.
I am now living 600 miles below the Mason Dixon line, people often ask where are you from!
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Old 05-22-2017, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,655 posts, read 8,680,463 times
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My sister and I (both northerners) inherited a beautiful antebellum home in the deep south. The more time we spend there, the more southern my sister's accent becomes. I find it fake and always think she comes across as a poser. It makes me cringe hearing her new southern accent in conversations. I refuse to alter the way I naturally speak in order to fit in or impress. I was hoping there are some southerners who appreciate that I'm being my authentic self with no pretense. But there are probably people like the OP who think I sound terrible. Oh well.
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Old 05-22-2017, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,753,379 times
Reputation: 5379
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCUBS1 View Post
My sister and I (both northerners) inherited a beautiful antebellum home in the deep south. The more time we spend there, the more southern my sister's accent becomes. I find it fake and always think she comes across as a poser. It makes me cringe hearing her new southern accent in conversations. I refuse to alter the way I naturally speak in order to fit in or impress. I was hoping there are some southerners who appreciate that I'm being my authentic self with no pretense. But there are probably people like the OP who think I sound terrible. Oh well.
Some people pick it up naturally. It is not necessarily fake.
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Old 05-22-2017, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
430 posts, read 298,578 times
Reputation: 741
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCUBS1 View Post
My sister and I (both northerners) inherited a beautiful antebellum home in the deep south. The more time we spend there, the more southern my sister's accent becomes. I find it fake and always think she comes across as a poser. It makes me cringe hearing her new southern accent in conversations. I refuse to alter the way I naturally speak in order to fit in or impress. I was hoping there are some southerners who appreciate that I'm being my authentic self with no pretense. But there are probably people like the OP who think I sound terrible. Oh well.
It may not be fake. I have been living in the South for over three years now, and although I don't think that I have picked up a southern accent, family and friends in Ohio think I sound very Southern, so there may be some truth to your sisters new found accent or speech. My spouse also sounds VERY southern and has picked up on phrases and words quite a bit since moving to Kentucky, but at times can also sound Northern. We live in a fairly rural area where most everyone has a Southern accent of the Appalachian variety, but in the cities you hear all sorts of accents.
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Old 05-22-2017, 03:32 PM
 
8,763 posts, read 10,877,322 times
Reputation: 12816
Some people's accents flatten out when living in an area--from what they originally had--and some take on some of the local accent. I have no clue why certain people never lose their original accent and some change.
Over the years, I've been told I have a "little bit of a NY accent," "sounds like a mid-western accent," sounds like you're from Boston," and "sounds like a local" when living in the SW. Wow!
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Old 05-22-2017, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,660 posts, read 27,118,214 times
Reputation: 9591
Quote:
Originally Posted by MegaJoy View Post
Y'all Come....
I was born in Florida, people born in Fl do not have a southern accent.
I grew up in Maryland. Most people think I am from New England.
I am now living 600 miles below the Mason Dixon line, people often ask where are you from!
To be fair, there is no one Southern accent.
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