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Old 11-22-2015, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Montreal
359 posts, read 264,395 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
I've always thought it was weird that Minnesota is in the Midwest in the US but Manitoba is considered the west in Canada, when they are pretty much the same thing.


I think Manitoba and Saskatchewan would both be considered Midwestern if they were part of the US. Either that or the US would have to create a new mental region out of them, the Dakotas and Minnesota.
Canada extends much farther east than the US does.
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Old 11-23-2015, 08:04 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,433 posts, read 18,339,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
Not sure how much we'd get, I think the vast majority of that is in Alberta.
Well yeah, it wouldn't be like acquiring the tar sands. Though the Williston basin where there oil fields in North Dakota are extends well into Saskatchewan and there is a fair amount of oil production up there as well.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bakken_Formation
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Old 11-23-2015, 10:28 AM
 
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Saskatchewan would be a "Great Plains" state, if located in the US ( overlapping with North Dakota and eastern Montana)...
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Old 11-23-2015, 11:43 AM
 
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In Canada, the Prairies are thought to begin around Steinbach MB, which is pretty much directly north of Thief River Falls MN. More of Minnesota borders Ontario than Manitoba, but I'm guessing the links with Manitoba are stronger than thinly populated Northwestern Ontario?
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Old 11-23-2015, 11:50 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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For me, definitely the West.

I consider the Great Plains states to be a Midwest influenced region of the West, though.
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Old 11-23-2015, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
In Canada, the Prairies are thought to begin around Steinbach MB, which is pretty much directly north of Thief River Falls MN. More of Minnesota borders Ontario than Manitoba, but I'm guessing the links with Manitoba are stronger than thinly populated Northwestern Ontario?
It depends on which part of Minnesota you are talking about. Duluth and Thunder Bay are closely linked and are very similar. For the Twin Cities the connection to Winnipeg is a lot closer, because, quite frankly, Thunder Bay is a dump while Winnipeg is a nice place. The Twin Cities status as the hub of the North American grain trade also connects it to the Canadian Prairies, a lot of what they produce comes through here. It seems like ever train that rolls through Minneapolis is either oil or a billboard for Alberta or Saskatchewan.
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Old 11-23-2015, 02:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
Duluth and Thunder Bay are closely linked and are very similar...Thunder Bay is a dump
I've passed through Duluth in the past, struck me as much nicer than Thunder Bay!

There are many in NW Ontario who have argued for joining Manitoba, including (I believe) a recent mayor of Kenora. It is much closer to Winnipeg and about a 15 hour drive to Toronto. Kenora and Rainy River districts were in fact disputed territory and given to Ontario in 1912.

If NW Ontario were part of Manitoba it would resemble the pattern of lakey/woodsy east and prairie west pattern of Minnesota.
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Old 11-24-2015, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
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Plus, the distance between the Pacific and Canada's Rockies is much smaller than it is south of the border.

But to answer the OP, I'd say the West because more of Saskatchewan borders Montana, a western state than it does with North Dakota. Also, when the Trans-Canada Highway finally reaches the Rockies, you are already west of some parts of California. That said, I'd still consider Manitoba Central Canada rather than Western, especially given that the main highway south into the US becomes I-29 and passes through the westernmost generally accepted Midwestern cities (Fargo, Sioux Falls, Omaha, and Kansas City).

I also find it weird for Quebec to be considered Central Canada since its westernmost border is still east of the western border of New York State.
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Old 11-25-2015, 04:58 PM
 
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To answer my own question it would probably be the Midwest (West North Central subregion) as Montana is considered part of the "Mountain" subregion of the West.
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Old 11-25-2015, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Part of the reason for that is that the east/west divide is much sharper in Canada.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
The one thing that has always amazed me when thinking about Canada's vastness is that Winnipeg with a metro population of only 800,000 is the biggest city in Canada between Toronto and Edmonton/Calgary. That's just such an amazingly large area that's unpopulated or only with small cities.
And that's why the east-west divide is so sharp in Canada: because there is very little between Winnipeg (in the west) and the population centres in southern Ontario (in the east).

Note that if you're driving, you're never very far from necessary services--pretty much every small town will have gas, a restaurant or two, and a comfortable and clean motel. But larger population centres are few and far between and I well remember the sign eastbound out of Thunder Bay that states, "Sault Ste. Marie, 768 km (477 miles)". There are small towns between the two, but as you leave Wawa, there is another sign that says, "No services next 220 km (136 miles)." In short, there isn't much there, and little reason to go there, unless you're just passing through.

Naturally, such emptiness doesn't make sense to a lot of people. I've had Australian, British, and American friends ask me, "Why is there nothing there?" The simple answer is that, in all but a few locations, the land is uninhabitable. It's either solid rock--the Canadian Shield--or it is a lake, with water trapped by rock, or it is muskeg, which is centuries' worth of rotting vegetation in a former lake trapped by rock. What settlements are there, are there for a reason: mining towns, ports, pulp mills, rail yards, and so on. But agriculture, industry, manufacturing, such as you might find in the Great Plains of the US or southern Ontario? Nope.

But this is the east-west divide in Canada. The Canadian Shield essentially divides us in half.
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