U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Legacy cities or non legacy
Legacy city 67 69.07%
Non legacy city 21 21.65%
No preference 9 9.28%
Voters: 97. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-24-2015, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,035 posts, read 23,933,408 times
Reputation: 30927

Advertisements

Legacy cities. I grew up in the Northeast, and those old buildings, venerable institutions, are what make a city great.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-24-2015, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
Reputation: 7075
Legacy cities.

I have lived in NYC, and a few smaller cities in CT. They just have so much character, culture and even today they are still advancing and evolving. Many of them are still growing, such as Boston and NYC, albeit at a slow rate.

Non-legacy cities have their own allure, too though. I live in Columbus, OH right now and can't complain. But it doesn't have the same impact or architecture you would find in a legacy city.

Either way, I don't care.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2015, 10:21 PM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,386,421 times
Reputation: 18522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
Non-legacy for living. New Orleans would be the exception, but just barely since it's still a Sunbelt town that's reinventing itself.
New Orleans may geographically be in the Sunbelt but it's really not a Sunbelt city, similar to how Columbus OH is in the Rustbelt but isn't a Rustbelt city. New Orleans is really a Southern legacy city as it matured in the pre-war era and hasn't experienced the breakneck growth that has characterized true Sunbelt cities like Austin, Houston, Dallas, Phoenix, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2015, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,205,355 times
Reputation: 10280
All the legacy cities are too cold, so non-legacy cities for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2015, 06:54 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,161,400 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
New Orleans may geographically be in the Sunbelt but it's really not a Sunbelt city, similar to how Columbus OH is in the Rustbelt but isn't a Rustbelt city. New Orleans is really a Southern legacy city as it matured in the pre-war era and hasn't experienced the breakneck growth that has characterized true Sunbelt cities like Austin, Houston, Dallas, Phoenix, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc.
The definition of the Sunbelt I'm using isn't based on breakneck growth during any set period. It's based on location, urban design and culture. Outside of the historic center of New Orleans, the landscape of the area is unmistakably Sunbelt in nature. It also embodies the laid back, live and let live attitude most Sunbelt cities are known for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2015, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,730 times
Reputation: 407
What about cities that have characteristics of both, such as Albuquerque?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2015, 12:20 PM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,386,421 times
Reputation: 18522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
The definition of the Sunbelt I'm using isn't based on breakneck growth during any set period. It's based on location, urban design and culture. Outside of the historic center of New Orleans, the landscape of the area is unmistakably Sunbelt in nature. It also embodies the laid back, live and let live attitude most Sunbelt cities are known for.
I'm not sure if there's a "Sunbelt landscape," since the Sunbelt stretches from the Bay Area down to Miami, which includes a lot of different landscapes. But the original definition of the terms was based on population growth from the North back to the South, and the economic growth that spurred that reverse migration. NOLA was built on legacy industries and has a more extensive old-school urban environment and as such, is something of an island within the geographic Sunbelt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2015, 12:33 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,161,400 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I'm not sure if there's a "Sunbelt landscape," since the Sunbelt stretches from the Bay Area down to Miami, which includes a lot of different landscapes. But the original definition of the terms was based on population growth from the North back to the South, and the economic growth that spurred that reverse migration. NOLA was built on legacy industries and has an extensive old-school urban environment and as such, is something of an island within the geographic Sunbelt.
Sunbelt landscape = post WW2 development, single family bungalows, manicured lawns, etc.

New Orleans may not have seen the same rate of growth as other Sunbelt cities, but it's hardly been stagnant. It's the Sunbelt's legacy city. Simple as that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2015, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,730 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
Sunbelt landscape = post WW2 development, single family bungalows, manicured lawns, etc.
If you consider 1/2 inch quarry stone to be a manicured lawn.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
Freeways and Boulevards.
Please elaborate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-25-2015, 01:04 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,161,400 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by kehkou View Post
If you consider 1/2 inch quarry stone to be a manicured lawn.
I think it serves the same purpose.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top