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View Poll Results: Legacy cities or non legacy
Legacy city 67 69.07%
Non legacy city 21 21.65%
No preference 9 9.28%
Voters: 97. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-22-2017, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
292 posts, read 283,918 times
Reputation: 322

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There are also plenty of historic architecture in non-legacy cities and the healthiest of them have more architectural variety overall. It's just a preference. Nothing to get defensive about.
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Old 04-22-2017, 07:39 PM
 
17,656 posts, read 4,058,482 times
Reputation: 5586
I prefer non-legacy
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Old 04-22-2017, 07:57 PM
 
29,881 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
There are also plenty of historic architecture in non-legacy cities and the healthiest of them have more architectural variety overall. It's just a preference. Nothing to get defensive about.
"Plenty"? Disagree with that, and the healthiest non-legacy cities do not have more architectural variety overall than legacy cities. That's simply not a factual statement. Anybody who thinks that a city like Houston has more architectural variety than a city like DC needs their eyesight checked.
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Old 04-22-2017, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
292 posts, read 283,918 times
Reputation: 322
No, it does not have more architectural variety. I never said that, don't put words in my mouth. DC is mostly older buildings though with a few modern ones. Houston has mostly modern buildings with a few historical ones.

Here is how I describe "plenty" and no, this isn't all we have, I'm just highlighting a few.

The Gulf Building


Houston Deco | 1920s | Gulf Building

Neils Esperson Building


https://www.pinterest.com/pin/350928995947777219/


https://www.emporis.com/buildings/32...houston-tx-usa

Houston Historic District
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ho...610063!6m1!1e1

Houston Heights, a streetcar suburb
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ho...610063!6m1!1e1
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Old 04-22-2017, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,749,193 times
Reputation: 8803
You literally said that the healthiest non-legacy cities have more architectural variety overall.
Houston is not the best example of that.
Healthiest legacy cities like Chicago, NYC, SF would have the best variety.
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Old 04-22-2017, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
292 posts, read 283,918 times
Reputation: 322
Well, I never said that it was Houston who had the most variety, just some variety. I would look at Miami for being more even between new and old. I disagree with the cities you posted. NYC and San Fran are mostly older buildings not mostly modern buildings. Only Chicago would be more even. Again, just my preference, no reason to have a heart attack.
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Old 04-22-2017, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,749,193 times
Reputation: 8803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
Well, I never said that it was Houston who had the most variety, just some variety. I would look at Miami for being more even between new and old. I disagree with the cities you posted. NYC and San Fran are mostly older buildings not mostly modern buildings. Only Chicago would be more even. Again, just my preference, no reason to have a heart attack.
I've had too many beers to have a heart attack. Chicago would be the best representation of old and new as far as my experiences so far. Miami would be a no for me. But you didn't say mostly new, you said most variety.
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Old 04-22-2017, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
292 posts, read 283,918 times
Reputation: 322
No, in my first post I said I preferred cities with mostly new architecture.
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Old 04-23-2017, 07:33 AM
 
29,881 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
No, it does not have more architectural variety. I never said that, don't put words in my mouth. DC is mostly older buildings though with a few modern ones. Houston has mostly modern buildings with a few historical ones.

Here is how I describe "plenty" and no, this isn't all we have, I'm just highlighting a few.

The Gulf Building


Houston Deco | 1920s | Gulf Building

Neils Esperson Building


https://www.pinterest.com/pin/350928995947777219/


https://www.emporis.com/buildings/32...houston-tx-usa

Houston Historic District
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ho...610063!6m1!1e1

Houston Heights, a streetcar suburb
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ho...610063!6m1!1e1
You obviously know nothing about DC and other healthy legacy cities if you think they only have "a few" modern buildings. DC, NYC, Chicago, etc. clearly have much more architectural variety than the likes of Houston, Dallas, Phoenix, etc. Either one knows little about the architectural legacy of these cities or is extremely biased to say otherwise.
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Old 04-23-2017, 02:15 PM
 
3,215 posts, read 1,543,956 times
Reputation: 2332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
Well, I never said that it was Houston who had the most variety, just some variety. I would look at Miami for being more even between new and old. I disagree with the cities you posted. NYC and San Fran are mostly older buildings not mostly modern buildings. Only Chicago would be more even. Again, just my preference, no reason to have a heart attack.
It s just too bad Houston did not SAVE MORE OF OLD HOUSTON. It had finally is getting what is left SAVED? Well more then was the Raze and let stand attitude or just for parking.

The thing is ASIAN cities do FAR MORE INTERESTING NEW buildings then US cities today. Much of HOUSTON especially. The basic BOC as cheapest to build still rules. Ironically, a city like Dubai has much of its buildings with American Architects. They can do more then a glass box there.

Their tallest building in the world has the same Architecture Firm as 3 of Chicago's super-talks. The 1968 John Hancock building, 1974's Sears (Willis) Tower and 2009's Trump Tower. The Trump Tower has aspects like the tallest Big brother with the same parents as it is in Dubai.

So a Houston NOT saving more of OLD HOUSTON. Has Asian cities leaving it in the DUST IN NEW ARCHITECTURE that Houston thought would make it into a MODERN METROPOLIS in its core. So far it falls short in new architecture even over some Legacy cities in what they build.
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