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View Poll Results: Legacy cities or non legacy
Legacy city 67 69.07%
Non legacy city 21 21.65%
No preference 9 9.28%
Voters: 97. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-23-2017, 07:57 PM
 
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I'd lean towards legacy, although I'm not a fan of some legacy cities ..

I'm also not sure if a city like Minneapolis is indeed a legacy city--it seems like it straddles the border between the two types...
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Old 04-23-2017, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
These were your exact words:



The majority of buildings in the healthiest legacy cities are older, but on average they have more modern buildings than non-legacy cities have older buildings.

And to be clear, "modern" starts at the post-war/midcentury era, at least for me.
Yeah so I'm saying they are mostly older buildings. So it's the same thing.
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Old 04-24-2017, 01:11 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Legacy cities. I like cities that have character and history to boot. I do like some modern non-legacy cities but they have to really stand out some way, like Portland or Las Vegas.
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Old 04-24-2017, 06:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
Yeah so I'm saying they are mostly older buildings. So it's the same thing.
No...it's not. You don't have much experience with legacy cities obviously.

Just say you prefer non-legacy cities and predominantly modern architecture and leave it at that.
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Old 04-24-2017, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,793,965 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
I love the architecture in Houston, always have. The Williams Tower, 1500 Louisiana, Wells Fargo Plaza. Pennzoil Place was voted the best building built in the 70s. I invited a friend from North Carolina over, she loved how modern everything was too.
I love the architecture as well. The problem is the lobbies of the buildings we admire are like tombs after hours and on weekends, leaving the streets of the CBD dormant most of the time. (Granted, the tunnels exasperate the situation.) Discover Green is an admirable effort to breathe some life into downtown. Until the residential population reaches a critical mass, however, there are only so many people who will wander over to that oasis on any given day (and as we know, Houston's long, hot summers don't lend themselves as an inviting climate for "outdooring").

I prefer legacy cities for their mix of architectural styles and the fact that they offer a rich work/live/play urban lifestyle.
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Old 04-24-2017, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I love the architecture as well. The problem is the lobbies of the buildings we admire are like tombs after hours and on weekends, leaving the streets of the CBD dormant most of the time. (Granted, the tunnels exasperate the situation.) Discover Green is an admirable effort to breathe some life into downtown. Until the residential population reaches a critical mass, however, there are only so many people who will wander over to that oasis on any given day (and as we know, Houston's long, hot summers don't lend themselves as an inviting climate for "outdooring").

I prefer legacy cities for their mix of architectural styles and the fact that they offer a rich work/live/play urban lifestyle.
We'll see what happens in the next few years. Several thousand units should finish this year and next.
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Old 04-24-2017, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
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I do not care either way, I look where the highest paying jobs in my field relative to cost of living and in health care it is in Nashville.
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Old 04-24-2017, 05:03 PM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,123,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
I'd lean towards legacy, although I'm not a fan of some legacy cities ..

I'm also not sure if a city like Minneapolis is indeed a legacy city--it seems like it straddles the border between the two types...
It does. But lots of people seem to forget just how much industry existed in Minneapolis. Basically a majority of all the flour milled and sold in the US came out of Minneapolis. St. Paul feels even older.

Some have said St Paul is the farthest west Eastern city while Minneapolis is the farthest east Western city.
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Old 04-24-2017, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
It does. But lots of people seem to forget just how much industry existed in Minneapolis. Basically a majority of all the flour milled and sold in the US came out of Minneapolis. St. Paul feels even older.

Some have said St Paul is the farthest west Eastern city while Minneapolis is the farthest east Western city.

Yes. Here's something I pulled out from Wiki: Pillsbury once claimed to have the largest grain mill in the world at the Pillsbury A-Mill overlooking Saint Anthony Falls on the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. The building had two of the most powerful direct-drive waterwheels ever built, each putting out 1200 horsepower (900 kW). The Pillsbury A-Mill was converted to artist lofts by the Dominium company in 2016.[c
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Old 04-24-2017, 07:31 PM
 
7,592 posts, read 9,442,547 times
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Here's my list of legacy cities. See if you agree....

Boston
NYC
Philadelphia
Baltimore
Wash DC
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
St. Louis
Milwaukee

Someone may add a few more to this, but this list should be the basis.
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